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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Guest editorial K-12: engineering's new frontier

    Page(s): 209 - 210
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE education society awards and frontiers in education conference awards

    Page(s): 211 - 214
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Transformation of higher education: the transdisciplinary approach in engineering

    Page(s): 289 - 295
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Educational programs face many difficulties because of the rapid change of technology in today's environment. The potential for educational programs based on the transdisciplinary model is discussed in order to address and overcome these difficulties. A closer relationship with industry in developing educational programs is suggested. Finally, a new transdisciplinary master of engineering program, developed jointly by industry and the Institute for Design and Advanced Technology at Texas Tech University, is described. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching computer design using virtual prototyping

    Page(s): 296 - 301
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (193 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The rapid increase in complexity and size of digital systems has reduced the effectiveness of old design methodologies based on physical prototyping. Prototyping via simulation must be used to achieve design cost and time-to-market goals when designing large digital systems. This virtual prototyping design methodology often permits the first physical prototype to be a manufacturable product. A two-course sequence has been developed to introduce students to this design paradigm. These courses teach virtual prototyping techniques and allow the students to use these techniques to develop a simple computer. The students simulate their designs, and then they implement their designs in hardware using field programmable hardware. This allows the students to complete an entire design cycle from idea to actual hardware implementation and compare their physical results to their simulated results. View full abstract»

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  • Web-based activities around a digital model railroad platform

    Page(s): 302 - 306
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    This paper describes a laboratory equipped for the teaching of advanced courses in computer engineering, computer science, information systems, and software engineering. Other related work areas include computer vision, real-time systems, programming languages, and computer architectures. The laboratory has been built around a digital model railroad platform controlled by a client-server system using an object-oriented language. The characteristics of this laboratory are suitable for implementing Web activities for educational purposes. The paper also includes an overview of the system in which most of these topics have been considered and a summary of the relationship with the most relevant international curricula in computing. View full abstract»

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  • A practical approach for converting group assignments into team projects

    Page(s): 273 - 282
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4359 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Engineering instructors frequently use group assignments to provide students experience in dealing with complex open-ended problems. Usually, they do not worry about training or maintaining teams, evaluating the effectiveness of the teams, or assessing the contribution of each individual. With the establishment of the ABET EC2000 criteria, ignoring these aspects becomes unacceptable. This report describes a practical method for converting a standard "group" assignment into a meaningful "team" learning experience and presents data showing the effectiveness of the approach. The approach requires some class time (less than two class periods in total) for training teams, for monitoring weekly progress, and for evaluating individual efforts. Also, it requires some additional instructor time (less than 15 h) for preparing instructional material on teaming, for assigning teams, and for preparing and evaluating student report forms on team progress and individual effort. Data from a senior-level courses show an improvement in the quality of the technical work, in the students' teaming skills, and in their attitude toward teaming that more than justify the class time and the extra instructor effort. View full abstract»

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  • University methodology for internetworking principles and design projects

    Page(s): 218 - 225
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    An undergraduate engineering internetworking learning environment that presents both internetworking principles and laboratory experimentation is described. The learning environment uses the source code availability of the Linux operating system as a case study of the implementation issues and ramifications of internet networking infrastructures. Laboratory use of experimentation with internetworking equipment and software allows interaction with internetworking principles and fundamentals as well as implementation and performance issues. The objectives of this environment include providing a comprehensive mechanism whereby students are exposed to fundamentals and principles that may readily be applied to experimental-based internetwork research and internetwork product development. A follow-on capstone design environment is also briefly described. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching electromagnetic waves to electrical engineering students: an abridged approach

    Page(s): 283 - 288
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    This paper describes the rationale of a one semester sophomore level basic course on electromagnetic waves for electrical engineers (emphasis on communications), which avoids the mathematical complexity associated with Maxwell's equations (differential operators, vector potential, wave equation) with no loss of logical rigor nor substantial loss of formal rigor. The course is based in the postulation of the fields produced by an accelerated charge in the nonrelativistic limit, and the obtainment of a uniform plane wave as the limiting case of a spherical wave when observed far from the source. In this way, the student can begin working with the full vector description of electromagnetic waves and with relevant scientific and technical examples from the second course week, and his/her effort is directed more to the use and interpretation of waves than to their mathematical derivation. Further postulation of the Huygens-Fresnel principle puts the student in a position to tackle most of the basic problems of wave optics and radiation systems. Although some penalties are paid by this approach (more additional postulates are required; students miss the ability to solve boundary value problems; engineering textbooks are not written with this background; professors feel attached to the classical approach), it has been found much more efficient than the standard Maxwell's equations as an introduction to telecommunication topics. Also, students find it more interesting, motivating, and rewarding. View full abstract»

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  • The exact and unique solution for phase-lead and phase-lag compensation

    Page(s): 258 - 262
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    Phase-lead and -lag compensation is one of the most commonly used techniques for designing control systems in the frequency domain, especially when the Bode diagram or root locus is used. In most cases, the graphic-based approximation or trial-and-error approach has been utilized in the design process. This paper presents the exact and unique solution to the design of phase-lead and phase-lag compensation when the desired gains in the magnitude and phase are known at a given frequency. It also gives the concise condition for determining the existence of single-stage lead or lag compensation. View full abstract»

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  • Using the defining issues test for evaluating computer ethics teaching

    Page(s): 229 - 234
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    Since the publication in 1997 of the Australian Computer Society's (ACS) body of knowledge for computing professionals, a higher priority has been given to the teaching of computer ethics in Australia. This paper evaluates an undergraduate computer ethics teaching program using the defining issues test of moral judgment. A "before-and-after with a control group" research design was used. For both the experimental and control groups, a general increase in moral judgment development was observed over the semester. The experimental group exhibited a significantly larger increase in moral judgment development than the control group. However, it was found to be the result of an increase in the moral development of the female students rather than the male students. The results are discussed and the implications for studies in an education context are outlined. View full abstract»

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  • The automatic control telelab: a user-friendly interface for distance learning

    Page(s): 252 - 257
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    In this paper, a remote laboratory of automatic control is presented. The main target of this laboratory is to allow students to easily interact with a set of physical processes through the Internet. The student will be able to run experiments, change control parameters, and analyze the results remotely. The automatic control telelab (ACT) allows the user to design his/her own controller by means of the MATLAB/Simulink environment, and to test it on the actual plant through a user-friendly interface. An additional feature of ACT is its architecture, allowing for an easy integration of new processes for control experiments. The ACT is reachable at http://www.dii.unisi.it/∼control/act. View full abstract»

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  • Experiences in threading UML throughout a computer science program

    Page(s): 226 - 228
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    The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY, decided to standardize its computer science program on the unified modeling language (UML) for all software design representations. Converting the appropriate courses to support formal teaching or reinforcement of UML concepts was planned as a phased approach over four academic years. Formal UML instruction was planned for Computer Science 1 courses and the senior two-course software engineering capstone sequence. Reinforcement of UML would be in the intervening courses. Once implementation began, it became apparent that a prolonged period between formal blocks of instruction was insufficient. Instead, some additional courses were redesigned to support formal UML instruction. The end result was a richer and deeper exposure to UML than anticipated over the same timeframe. View full abstract»

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  • A hands-on experimental laboratory for undergraduate courses in automatic control

    Page(s): 263 - 272
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    An experimental laboratory for undergraduate courses in automatic control has been created at the Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy, to provide students with an environment where theoretical concepts can be applied, and the "look and feel" of a real-world problem, though small and simple, can be experienced. The laboratory is meant both for the basic course, titled Fundamentals of Automatic Control, and for advanced ones. Peculiar to the setup is the large number of students involved, with 72 experimental workstations being managed simultaneously. This paper describes the design, implementation, and use of the laboratory until now, dealing with the present experimental setup and the integration of laboratory assignments and lectures. View full abstract»

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  • Learning benefits of structural example-based adaptive tutoring systems

    Page(s): 241 - 251
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    This paper illustrates and evaluates a generic adaptive tutoring environment, structural example-based adaptive tutoring system (SEATS), based on the theory of cognitive knowledge acquisition. The system teaches by presenting side-by-side examples and highlighting their common structural components. This technique assists the process of generalization and reduces mapping by surface features, allowing students to apply their newly gained knowledge to different sets of problems. SEATS also implements adaptive presentation based on a straightforward model of student/user performance. SEATS was evaluated with a recursion tutorial used by 117 students in a 1-hour tutorial session. Results indicate that using adaptation in combination with the structural example-based feature produces an effect on rate and extent of learning significantly greater than when the features are used alone, or when both are absent. The study further points out that future evaluations will have to take students' curiosity into account, since many of them are likely to give at least some incorrect answers on purpose, to test the response of the system. The results indicate that building SEATS with simple adaptive mechanisms is an efficient way of teaching electronically. View full abstract»

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  • Computer vision in undergraduate education: modern embedded computing

    Page(s): 235 - 240
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    Computer vision has historically been taught as a graduate subject since few examples of the discipline were being practiced in mainstream engineering. In recent years, the incorporation of multimedia into embedded devices has drawn some vision topics into mainstream attention. Examples of consumer products include digital video recorders, cellular phones, and automobile collision-avoidance systems. This paper describes the development of an undergraduate course that incorporates some vision topics into the larger context of embedded computing. Traditional topics, such as processor types, dynamic power management, and real-time scheduling, are taught alongside relevant vision topics, such as codecs, concurrent interfaces, and multimedia signal acquisition, storage, and rendering. In lab work, the students program hardware to operate as a digital video camera. While the primary goal for the course is to teach embedded computing, a secondary goal for the course is to entice students into graduate study in computer vision. However, a major developmental point was to justify the vision content in the context of how it serves the needs of students not opting for graduate study, as well as how the course would impact students working in other related graduate research areas. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University