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Software, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • The xp programmer: the few-minutes programmer

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 16 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Assuring software quality assurance

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 48 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (262 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The term quality assurance (or QA) has a variety of interpretations. The most common one is that it ensures that developers, testers, or independent auditors have performed some form of scrutiny on a system to validate that it will work as required. Software quality assurance is similar but applies to the code or noncode artifacts. View full abstract»

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  • The trip-packing dilemma [agile software development]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 106 - 107
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A guiding principle behind agile software development is the idea of keeping things simple. Making life simpler is an admirable goal, but unfortunately many developers have a knack for making one of two errors: oversimplifying something that really is complex; and overcomplicating something that should be easy. The paper considers how Extreme Programming attacks over-embellishment with the YAGNI (you aren't gonna need it) principle. View full abstract»

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  • Extreme reading

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 108 - 110
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Numbers game: how to build a winning software business case

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 110 - 111
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • IT alignment and requirements engineering

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 111
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (186 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Questioning the software engineering unquestionables

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 120 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (214 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Don't solve a problem before you get to it

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 45 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (198 KB)  

    Many software engineers believe a detailed solution should be created and meticulously verified as solving the problem before any code is written. On the other hand, a few of us believe that we have not solved the problem until we deliver the software and prove it works. This difference in when we believe the problem is solved causes us to view the requirements document differently. The author believes requirements should describe the problem, not the solution, because the problem is not solved until we have got the code running. View full abstract»

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  • Is software engineering as we know it over the hill?

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 5 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (233 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Automated quality assurance for document understanding systems

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 76 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To process high-volume input data, such as the scanned images of publishers' book and journal collections, content understanding systems should run automatically, continuously, and without human attendance. Ensuring the output quality of such systems is a challenging task, however, and automated quality assurance techniques are thus essential to its success. The author discusses three automated QA techniques that were developed for Hewlett-Packard's Digital Content ReMastering system. View full abstract»

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  • Measurement modeling technology

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 68 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (286 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although rigorous measurement has become a necessity in the software industry, many measurement programs fail to deliver real benefit to software managers. The required data is often missing, invalid, or late. But a properly automated measurement system can deliver timely reports that enable proactive management. The measurement modeling technology introduced here supports such automation. It also establishes standard measurements and metrics that organizations can share and combine across projects, departments, and companies. View full abstract»

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  • Trends in software process: the PSP and agile methods

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 89 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (385 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Water cooler discussions often gravitate to trends-the "latest" software process, programming language, or Web development paradigm. Some of them justly deserve the title "trend" or "fad;" others do not. In this article, two practitioners share their experience with current, yet diverse, software process approaches that are starting to greatly affect the industry. One author describes Science Applications International Corporation's (SAIC) experience with the Personal Software Process. The other author shares Motorola's experience with agile methods, a lighter-weight process approach. It appears that despite their diversity, both approaches have resulted in improved productivity and in similar or even higher-quality levels of the resulting products (from previous releases). View full abstract»

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  • Long-term testing in a short-term world

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 64 - 67
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (221 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Accelerated stress testing reduces the time required to test a system but can be hard to apply to functions running on a fixed schedule. This article describes how to accelerate the testing of scheduled functions by triggering them through automated tests, either by periodically advancing the system clock or through a programmatic event interface. With this method, the accelerated stress tests don't distort the system's operational profile. View full abstract»

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  • An eye on India: outsourcing debate continues

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 114 - 117
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB)  

    US companies increasingly began outsourcing software development work to countries such as India, which touts low personnel costs and plentiful technical expertise, during the dotcom shakeout. Today, the trend shows no sign of stopping. It has changed the landscape for US software professionals, reshaping how companies plan projects and choose employees. US software developers will not be going the way of the dinosaurs, analysts say, but they will need to cleverly manage their careers and thoroughly understand the new environment. At the same time, businesses are learning more about offshore outsourcing's challenges. The author discusses the growing debate about its merits. View full abstract»

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  • Best practices in code inspection for safety-critical software

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the most important issues in analyzing safety-critical systems is code verification through an inspection checklist, whose items must be applied to the source code. The attention given to this list will help ensure obedience to good coding rules and represents an important factor in the design of safety-critical systems. This list also helps in the development of non-safety-critical systems, improving their quality and correctness. View full abstract»

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  • Now the work of software professionals changes everything

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 92 - 97
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (273 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software professionals' work remains vital to modern industrial society as key definitions of work, the organization of work, and the relationship of modern software systems to society's evolution demonstrate. This article discusses why the question of what work to pursue is interesting with regard to the software field; it also explores the meaning of work itself and its relation to the individual, society, and the economy. View full abstract»

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  • Introducing XP into Greenfield Projects: lessons learned

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 21 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (239 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    ThoughtWorks introduced XP into an organization and successfully completed a bleeding-edge technology project with client staff that had no previous experience using an agile development approach. This article illustrates not only how XP helped make the project a success, but also gives other lessons learned regarding the introduction of XP at client sites. View full abstract»

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  • Components and the world of chaos

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 83 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    Many writers espouse the idea that commercial software development will soon consist of tribes of monkeys assembling commercially available components, resulting in faster development, significantly reduced costs, and more reliable software. Although we all dream that complex applications development will eventually become faster, cheaper, and better, realizing this dream with components as currently conceived has some fundamental flaws. Application development in the component world involves three categories of development: designing and developing component implementation and constructing applications. We focus on the latter-constructing application components and applications using a component framework and a suite of existing components. View full abstract»

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  • XP and the CMM

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 14 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (241 KB)  

    Organizations implementing XP practices can easily fit them under the SW-CMM because it represents a framework for self-improvement. However, there is a problem that organizations must address: putting XP to work in an SW-CMM environment is often difficult, because guidance on how to take advantage of existing best practices is not available while transitioning to XP. View full abstract»

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  • Generating text search applications for databases

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 98 - 105
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (450 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To develop reusable domain-based assets, the author shows how to connect a domain analysis tool's output to a program generator and then to a domain implementation's input. The generator he built using Java, XML, and Oracle tools can produce code for JSP, PL/SQL, and PSP. This domain engineering research project demonstrated that it is possible to successfully implement software product lines in industrial environments using existing tools. View full abstract»

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  • Web developers continue to focus on interoperability

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 117 - 118
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    As the Internet becomes increasingly important for international business transactions and consumer interactions, there is a growing need to ensure that the various types of Web communications happen without compatibility issues. Standards groups and others are working in several areas to make sure that interoperability does not slow the continuing Internet boom. View full abstract»

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  • Statistical process control to improve coding and code review

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 50 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (476 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software process comprises activities such as estimation, planning, requirements analysis, design, coding, reviews, and testing, undertaken when creating a software product. Effective software process management involves proactively managing each of these activities. Statistical process control tools enable proactive software process management. One such tool, the control chart, can be used for managing, controlling, and improving the code review process. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements are corporate assets

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 86 - 88
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (231 KB)  

    After the software is implemented, the requirements are often put on the shelf to gather dust. Instead, the author tells us how treating our requirements as valuable assets can save organizations significant time and money. View full abstract»

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  • Assessing XP at a European Internet company

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 37 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2205 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fst, a European Internet services company, has been experimenting with introducing XP in its development work. The article describes the company's experiences with XP, explores its implementation practice by practice, and discusses XPs pros and cons in three key areas; customer relationships, project management, and ISO 9001 quality assurance. View full abstract»

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  • A license to practice software engineering

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 112 - 113
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (242 KB)  

    The enduring effort to infuse more engineering discipline into software development has brought several issues to the forefront: standards, best practices, and, perhaps the most controversial, licensing and certification. To get an update on this area, I spoke with an expert: Leonard Tripp, Boeing Technical Fellow and past president of the IEEE Computer Society. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
Athina 104 33, Greece
dds@computer.org