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MultiMedia, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date April-June 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
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  • Asynchronous voice: a personal account

    Page(s): 70 - 74
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    Asynchronous voice is the interactive communication process of people leaving voice messages for other people and the other people responding with their voice messages. A primitive form of asynchronous voice is a kind of telephone tag in which people use voice mail to have an interactive conversation. The author gives a personal account of his work with asynchronous voice and asynchronous learning. View full abstract»

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  • Video coding for mobile communications: efficiency, complexity and resilience [Book Review]

    Page(s): 81 - 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Beyond windows

    Page(s): 88 - 87
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    First Page of the Article
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  • South Korea beats the world in broadband gaming

    Page(s): 12 - 14
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    South Korea has found the killer application for broadband services: online gaming. Korea's broadband revolution has taken much of the world by surprise. In 2001, Korea had a third of all asymmetric digital subscriber lines (ADSL) in the world. In January 2003, Korea's Ministry of Information and Communication announced that 26.27 million South Koreans had access to broadband, more than 50 percent of the population. In comparison, the penetration rate in the US and the European Union is barely 10 percent. The overall market for video games, both online gaming and packaged software, is growing faster than the market for movies and music. View full abstract»

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  • Does hypermedia really work for tutoring children?

    Page(s): 65 - 69
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    The advent of multimedia technology has produced an explosion of research on the use of computers in education. Indeed, the computer is a rich communication tool that instructors can use for effectively illustrating ideas. However, compared to human communication, computers lack several features needed for satisfactory communication. They don't have analogies to eyes, ears, voice, and hands that humans use for acquiring information; neither can they create different information representations. Graphic, video, animation, and sound use in multimedia systems attempts to overcome these limitations to develop systems that can better communicate and cooperate with humans. Several recently developed hypermedia environments - both online (on the World Wide Web) or offline (on CD-ROM) - promote knowledge acquisition on a wide range of topics and attempt to teach problem-solving abilities in users. However, the basic question of whether hypermedia learning environments actually promote learning is still debatable, Our work here refers to a hypermedia designed for a particular category of users, namely children in a primary school. The hypermedia offers a tutoring component to teach basic logic concepts to children. We call this hypermedia Logiocando, a name obtained by merging two Italian words (Logica Giocando) and meaning "playing with logic." To determine whether this tutoring hypermedia really works (that is, to check its instructional validity), we performed two experiments that evaluated the pedagogical efficiency of the hypermedia in comparison to traditional classroom instruction. View full abstract»

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  • Migrating from mobile telephony to multipurpose gadgets

    Page(s): 8 - 11
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    If you asked people 20 years ago what they could do with their phone, they would have simply said, "Call people". Today, a reply would not be that short and easy. The transformations this device has undergone over the last two decades are tremendous. The mobile phone has evolved into a sleek multifuncational marvel. However, the versatile new models are not as good as the old ones when it comes to clear reception. Also, mobile phones' additional functions eat up battery life, so there is less talk time. The author looks at how mobile telephoning has turned into mobile media-based information exchange and the turmoil this transformation has caused. View full abstract»

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  • Standardizing automotive multimedia interfaces

    Page(s): 76 - 78
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    For a variety of reasons, vehicles have lagged behind home and mobile computing devices when it comes to productivity and multimedia tools. Safety, durability, cost, and design time have all factored into auto manufacturers' delayed acceptance of the new technology. The paper discusses standards for automotive multimedia interfaces. Organizations such as the Automotive Multimedia Interface Collaboration (AMI-C) have an opportunity to be the driving force behind standardization efforts. View full abstract»

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  • Editing out video editing

    Page(s): 54 - 64
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    This article outlines a paradigm shift in media production: the advent of computational media production that will automate the capture, editing, and reuse of video content. By integrating metadata creation and (re)use throughout the media production process, we enable the mass customization of video. View full abstract»

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  • Fictive art in new media

    Page(s): 4 - 7
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    Are we now seeing a 'pataphysical world where scientific anomaly is the concern of scientists as well as nonscientists, and where the convincingly portrayed worlds are as compelling as so-called reality? Perhaps the proliferating worlds of fictiveness owe something to the nature of new technologies which allow for seamless "alterations", endless play, and algorithmic inventiveness. Programs like Adobe Photoshop, for instance, allow anyone to play with reality, limited only by their imagination. In the hands of fictive-minded artists, these new technologies are opening a whole new set of 'pataphysical strategies. View full abstract»

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  • Where does computational media aesthetics fit?

    Page(s): 18 - 27
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    The huge volume of multimedia data now available calls for effective management solutions. Computational media aesthetics (CMA), one response to this data-management problem, attempts to handle multimedia data using domain-driven inferences. To provide a context for CMA, this article reviews multimedia content management research. View full abstract»

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  • Sounding objects

    Page(s): 42 - 52
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    Interactive systems, virtual environments, and information display applications need dynamic sound models rather than faithful audio reproductions. This implies three levels of research: auditory perception, physics-based sound modeling, and expressive parametric control. Parallel progress along these three lines leads to effective auditory displays that can complement or substitute visual displays. This article aims to shed some light on how psychologists, computer scientists, acousticians, and engineers can work together and address these and other questions arising in sound design for interactive multimedia systems. View full abstract»

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  • Pivot vector space approach for audio-video mixing

    Page(s): 28 - 40
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    An audio-mixing artist usually adds the musical accompaniment to video. Employing such artists is expensive and not feasible for a home video presentation. Our automatic audio-video mixing technique is suited for home videos. It uses a pivot vector space mapping method that matches video shots with music segments based on aesthetic cinematographic heuristics. View full abstract»

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The magazine contains technical information covering a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications

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Editor-in-Chief
John R. Smith
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center