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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date April 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Society members named to fellow grade

    Page(s): 8 - 10
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reliability of computer systems and networks: fault tolerance, analysis, and design [Book Review]

    Page(s): 24
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Power line local area networking

    Page(s): 32 - 33
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  • In-home networking

    Page(s): 72
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  • "The time keepers"

    Page(s): 96
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  • Modeling and evaluation of the indoor power line transmission medium

    Page(s): 41 - 47
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    The aim of this article is to outline the possibilities of indoor power lines when used to support local area networks in homes or small offices. For this purpose, the channel characteristics are described and a channel model is presented. This model is related to the physical nature of common indoor power lines, so its parameters can be defined in a straightforward way. Based on it, the performance of communication systems that use discrete multitone modulation, which appears to be the most suitable technique for these channels, is evaluated. Finally, a discussion about medium access control strategies is included. View full abstract»

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  • Extending the power line LAN up to the neighborhood transformer

    Page(s): 64 - 70
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    This article reports on the performance of audio, video, multimedia, and other high-data-rate in-home networking applications. The article starts by describing the problems encountered in power line communication channels in terms of frequency response and noise characteristics, and explains how in-home power line LANs can be extended to the neighborhood transformer. OFDM physical layers providing speeds of 45 Mb/s and 200 Mb/s as well as QoS and security are introduced. Finally, the results of large tests involving several thousands of nodes are described. View full abstract»

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  • A discrete multitone transceiver at the heart of the PHY layer of an in-home power line communication local-area network

    Page(s): 48 - 53
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    A networked home is a micro-version of the Internet, connecting home appliances, PCs, and other smart devices not only to one another but also to a globally connected world through the Internet. For consumers to embrace home networking, a solution that utilizes the existing infrastructure within the home, such as electrical wiring, is significant. However, the use of power lines as a home networking platform presents quite a troublesome and noisy environment that fluctuates with varying load impedance and time, and is also plagued by impulse noise. The latest developments in VLSI and DSP technologies have enabled power line communication (PLC) networks to compensate for the impairments of the environment. This article discusses the use of discrete multitone technology at the PHY layer of an in-home PLC network, particularly with reference to bit-loading techniques. View full abstract»

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  • A comparative performance study of wireless and power line networks

    Page(s): 54 - 63
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    Local area networks based on the IEEE 802.11a/b wireless networking standards and emerging power line communication (PLC) standards are attractive for establishing networks with no new wires for in-home and business applications. This article presents a theoretical performance comparison of the 802.11 a/b and HomePlug 1.0 PLC protocols. The article also presents comprehensive comparative field test results addressing such issues as coverage, channel stability, and reliability as well as the associated implications on the capability of these technologies to provide QoS support for multimedia traffic in typical residential settings. View full abstract»

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  • QoS-enabled residential gateway architecture

    Page(s): 83 - 89
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    As networking technologies penetrate wide varieties of devices for daily usage, home networks are becoming a reality. The bandwidth and always-on connectivity provided by the rapidly growing broadband technologies, such as cable and digital subscriber line (DSL), render home networking even more attractive. A residential gateway is a device that interconnects various home devices to one another as well as to the Internet. The home networks being deployed today are simple and inexpensive with the residential gateway providing only connectivity. As home networks evolve and become more widespread, emerging applications on home networks will demand additional features that require quality of service. We present an architecture of a next-generation QoS-enabled residential gateway. Such a residential gateway, in conjunction with the developments in QoS-enabled wireless LAN technologies, will usher in a new generation of home networks that are capable of supporting a wide range of applications. View full abstract»

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  • Power line communications: state of the art and future trends

    Page(s): 34 - 40
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    This article constitutes an overview of the research, application, and regulatory activities on power line communications. Transmission issues on the power line are investigated and modeling approaches illustrated. Contemporary communication techniques and reliability issues are treated. A description of regulatory activities worldwide is given. Finally, market perspectives and promising applications are covered to assess the viability of this communications environment. View full abstract»

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  • Ubiquitous homelinks based on IEEE 1394 and ultra wideband solutions

    Page(s): 74 - 82
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    This article investigates a home entertainment and computing network proposal, which takes advantage of ultra wideband (UWB) impulse radio technology and the IEEE 1394 system. We first compare various present home networking technologies. Then we introduce an overview of the IEEE 1394 high-performance serial bus. After that, we describe the network architecture of the proposed home networking scheme, IEEE 1394-based UWB home entertainment and computing networks connected by a wireless 1394 bridge. The IEEE 1394 backbone network and UWB impulse radio subsystem are discussed in detail, as well. Summaries are also provided. View full abstract»

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  • Waveband switching in optical networks

    Page(s): 105 - 112
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    The rapid advances in dense wavelength-division multiplexing technology with hundreds of wavelengths per fiber and worldwide fiber deployment have brought about a tremendous increase in the size (i.e., number of ports) of photonic cross-connects, as well as in the cost and difficulty associated with controlling such large cross-connects. Waveband switching (WBS) has attracted attention for its practical importance in reducing the port count, associated control complexity, and cost of photonic cross-connects. We show that WBS is different from traditional wavelength routing, and thus techniques developed for wavelength-routed networks (including, for example, those for traffic grooming) cannot be directly applied to effectively address WBS-related problems. We describe two multigranular OXC architectures for WBS. By using the multilayer MG-OXC in conjunction with intelligent WBS algorithms for both static and dynamic traffic, we show that one can achieve considerable savings in the port count. We also present various WBS schemes and lightpath grouping strategies, and discuss issues related to waveband conversion and failure recovery in WBS networks. View full abstract»

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  • On the synergy between electrical and photonic switching

    Page(s): 98 - 104
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    This article focuses on the values of electrical switching vs. photonic switching in the context of telecom transport networks. In particular, we show that the requirement of providing agility at the optical layer in the face of traffic forecast uncertainties is served better through photonic switching. On the other hand, some of the network-level functions, such as fast protection, subwavelength aggregation, and flexible client connectivity, require electrical switching. We further argue that additional values are achieved with hybrid photonic and electrical switching, which do not exist when either of these options is used in isolation. View full abstract»

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  • An infrastructure for the management of dynamic service networks

    Page(s): 120 - 126
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    Infrastructures for creating and deploying dynamically cooperating distributed services have become popular. An area that these infrastructures address only insufficiently is the administration of services and their relationships. This article takes an in-depth look at some management topics that are particularly important in a dynamic service environment: service life cycle and service dependencies. It states requirements for these areas that a management system has to fulfill. The article also describes MADYSON (Management Architecture for Dynamic Service-Oriented Networks), a management infrastructure that was developed based on these requirements. View full abstract»

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  • Toward IP virtual private network quality of service: a service provider perspective

    Page(s): 113 - 119
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    To complement classical enterprise wide area network infrastructures, IP (based) virtual private networks have been gaining ground, with the capability of offering cost-effective, secure, and private-network-like services. In order to provision the equivalent quality of service of legacy connection-oriented layer 2 virtual private networks (VPNs), IP VPNs have to overcome the intrinsically best effort characteristics of the Internet in this multimedia era. This article discusses the IP VPN quality of service (QoS) issue from a service provider point of view, where QoS guarantees are carried out at the network level as well as at the node level. It presents the whole picture by highlighting and stitching together various QoS enabling technologies from previous research and engineering work. View full abstract»

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  • Pin&Play: the surface as network medium

    Page(s): 90 - 95
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    Integrating appliances in the home through a wired network often proves to be impractical: routing cables is usually difficult, changing the network structure afterward even more so, and portable devices can only be connected at fixed connection points. Wireless networks are not the answer either: batteries have to be regularly replaced or changed, and what they add to the device's size and weight might be disproportionate for smaller appliances. In Pin&Play, we explore a design space in between typical wired and wireless networks, investigating the use of surfaces to network objects that are attached to it. This article gives an overview of the network model, and describes functioning prototypes that were built as a proof of concept. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sean Moore
Centripetal Networks