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Power and Energy Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March-April 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Valuation of services. Competitive industry modeling

    Page(s): 14 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1489 KB)  

    This tutorial presents an overview of the externalities that impact the electricity spot market. The importance of this modeling is to provide proper and thorough valuation of the services offered by each industry segment. There are several alternative ways to model this multiple market interaction. Two approaches are discussed: Leontief energy model and supply chain. Their relationship to the Porter five-forces model is presented. View full abstract»

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  • Transient electronics: pulsed circuit technology [Book Review]

    Page(s): 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (460 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reaching the pinnacle: congratulations to 2003 IEEE fellows

    Page(s): 74 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (875 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Power of symbols: IEEE trademarks and service marks

    Page(s): 76 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • Substation automation. IED integration and availability of information

    Page(s): 22 - 31
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    The advent of power industry deregulation has placed greater emphasis on the availability of information, the analysis of this information, and the subsequent decision-making to optimize system operation in a competitive environment. Intelligent electronic devices (IEDs) being implemented in substations contain valuable information, both operational and nonoperational, needed by many user groups within the utility. The challenge facing utilities is determining a standard integration architecture that meets the utility's specific needs, can extract the desired operational and nonoperational information, and deliver this information to the users who have applications to analyze the information. This article provides an overview of substation integration and automation fundamentals and focuses on best practices. View full abstract»

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  • Power signature analysis

    Page(s): 56 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (558 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nonintrusive load monitoring (NILM) can determine operating schedule of electrical loads in a target system from measurements made at a centralized location, such as the electric utility service entry. NILM is an ideal platform for extracting useful information about any system that uses electromechanical devices. It has a low installation cost and high reliability because it uses a bare minimum of sensors. It is possible to use modem state and parameter estimation algorithms to verify remotely the "health" of electromechanical loads by using NILM to analyze measured waveforms associated with the operation of individual loads. NILM can also monitor the operation of the electrical distribution system itself, identifying situations where two or more otherwise healthy loads interfere with each other's operation through voltage waveform distortion or power quality problems. Strategies for nonintrusive monitoring have developed over the last 20 years. Advances in computing technology make a new wealth of computational tools useful in practical, field-based NILM systems. This article reviews techniques for high-performance nonintrusive load and diagnostic monitoring and illustrates key points with results from field tests. View full abstract»

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  • Substation integration pilot project

    Page(s): 42 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) has been automating its power system operations and corporate business procedures for some time. OPPD is a medium-sized electric utility of approximately 2400 employees, 302000 electric customers, and a 2000 MW system peak load. Traditionally, departments have automated their own systems, creating islands of information. Therefore, a need to integrate systems to make information available at the corporate level required consideration. In 2000, an OPPD Automation Plan was initiated to coordinate and integrate systems on a corporate-wide basis. As a result of this plan, initiatives were recommended for a new energy management system (EMS), automatic meter reading, mobile computing, distribution automation (DA), and substation automation (SA). In June 2000, a consultant was hired to assist in developing a substation automation plan and to assist in implementing the Utility Communications Architecture (UCA) in the plan for a pilot project. This article addresses this pilot project, including its objectives, overview, issues, and evaluation. View full abstract»

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  • Plan ahead for substation automation

    Page(s): 32 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (219 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Technological improvements to intelligent electronic devices (IEDs) and the communication facilities and protocols that enable their integration are occurring at a rapid pace. To ensure that ongoing internal efforts to integrate the IEDs has proper direction given industry developments, MidAmerican Energy Company developed a substation automation (SA) plan and is in the process of implementing it at two pilot substations. Before proceeding with system implementation activities, MidAmerican elected to develop a business case to ensure that the operational and strategic benefits that would be achieved and the costs to achieve these benefits were well understood ahead of time. Lack of a solid business case has always been one of the leading obstacles to the successful implementation of electric utility automation projects. Building a business case for the automation project will ensure that the costs and the benefits, both monetary and strategic, are well understood ahead of time and are supportive of company business drivers. This article describes the methodology used to develop the business case for expanding the implementation of SA technologies at MidAmerican's substations and summarizes the results of this analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Infrastructure roots. Evolution of electric power in the United States

    Page(s): 20 - 21
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    Electricity holds a unique place in the US infrastructure. It is a commodity, a technology, and a necessity. Electric utilities must walk a fine line to balance each of these aspects. While electricity is a commodity that may be bought and sold, it must also be regulated to remain affordable for the general population. Reliability is continually balanced against the cost of upgrades and maintenance. This paper discusses the interconnection of regional area power systems in the US and the benefits such interconnection brings. View full abstract»

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  • Agent-based substation automation

    Page(s): 50 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (257 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Agent technology is one of the most interesting developments in the field of distributed artificial intelligence. It has a wide range of applications, with information management, intelligent user interfaces, personal assistants, and Internet commerce among the most popular. This article defines a generic architecture that applies the multiagent systems methodology to the field of substation automation, describes the design of a system to be implemented based on this architecture, and proposes several possible applications. Compared with SCADA or client-server substation automation solutions, an agent-based system offers a number of advantages. Each function or task of the system, such as the management of a single IED, can be encapsulated within a separate agent, making the system highly modular. Agents are loosely coupled, typically communicating via messaging rather than by procedure calls (remote or local), and, using directory services, new functions can easily be added to an agent-based system by creating a new agent, which will then make its capabilities available to others. The inherently distributed power system architecture is suited ideally to a multiagent system, which provides greater autonomy to each of the constituent parts than a traditional system. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Power & Energy Magazine is a bimonthly magazine dedicated to disseminating information on all matters of interest to electric power engineers and other professionals involved in the electric power industry.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Melvin I. Olken
molken@ieee.org