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IT Professional

Issue 2 • Date Mar/Apr 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Personalizing Web sites with mixed-initiative interaction

    Page(s): 9 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (587 KB)  

    Personalization refers to the automatic adjustment of information content, structure, and presentation tailored to an individual user. Commercial Web sites increasingly employ personalization to help retain customers and reduce information overload. A Web site is personalized if a user can interact with the site in an expressive way to achieve his information-seeking goals. Thus, personalizing the user's interaction is the best way to achieve personalization. The paper discusses mixed initiative interaction and the use of XSLT for personalization. View full abstract»

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  • The Babylon project: toward an extensible text-mining platform

    Page(s): 23 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (667 KB)  

    GlaxoSmithKline committed to adopting Verity, an indexing and search engine, to retrieve knowledge within the company intranet. Verity was attractive because it supported taxonomy-oriented browsing and concept-enhanced search. To tap the power in Verity's features, GlaxoSmithKline's Data Exploration Sciences began the Babylon project in late 2002 with two primary goals: develop a text-mining platform that would be the foundation for a variety of text-mining applications and would be extensible to a variety of domains; and develop one or more significant prototype applications on that platform. The first prototype application considered was to mine reports on adverse drug events to identify trends, drug and reaction events, or drug-drug interactions that might not be apparent in nontextual structured databases. The paper discusses the Babylon project. View full abstract»

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  • Who is collecting your Java garbage?

    Page(s): 44 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (775 KB)  

    Garbage collection can really drain a Java system. Understanding the different GC algorithms your JVM might use is the first step toward improving system efficiency. This article summarizes current technologies of GC techniques implemented in most available Java platforms and discusses future trends in this discipline. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction to object-oriented systems engineering.1

    Page(s): 38 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (362 KB)  

    Within software development, object-oriented (OO) analysis provides an incremental and iterative approach to guide the requirements definition, design, and development of software-intensive systems. OO analysis uses the Unified Modeling Language (UML) to capture and represent these requirements. UML permits specification of the product independent of programming language or development process. This independent product representation has raised interest in the systems engineering community: OO methods might be a mechanism to unite product development disciplines and remove the gap between the specified and as-built products. The paper discusses the object oriented systems engineering process. View full abstract»

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  • Evolution on the network edge: intelligent devices

    Page(s): 32 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB)  

    A network's edge is arguably one of its most important areas, because this is where it delivers services to network users-or, from the Internet service provider perspective, to subscribers. Devices at the network's edge classify, prioritize, and mark packets for the rest of the network to understand, and ultimately allow them into the network. Given modern networks' complex internetworking, it is not surprising that developing and maintaining edge devices are tasks that head the agendas of most of today's network equipment manufacturers, carriers, service providers, and network administrators. This article examines key elements of current network edge devices and the network topologies that work best with them. It also discusses Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS), a standardized solution that combines the performance and virtual circuit capabilities of data-link-layer switching with the proven scalability of network layer routing used by today's edge devices. View full abstract»

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  • XML strategies for legacy database search

    Page(s): 16 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (518 KB)  

    Over the past few years, XML (Extensible Markup Language) has become the standard for data and document interchange between distributed systems. With the continuing proliferation of the Internet, XML has also become a key technology for transactional e-business. A large percentage of Internet interactions, however, involves searching through documents, Web pages, databases, and other information resources. This article explores some of the ways XML can improve these types of searches. It focuses particularly on searches through legacy databases and on the changes you can make to your legacy systems to effectively exploit XML. View full abstract»

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  • 9-11 information failures: a semiotic approach

    Page(s): 64, 61 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (333 KB)  

    The events leading to 11 September 2001 seem to indicate an interaction of oversights, which, in concert, compromised security. Here, we use a semiotic model to explain some of what went wrong prior to 9-11. Semiotics involves the study of signs and symbols to better understand their meaning and contextual relation. We begin with so-called information. For information to be useful, it must be necessary; and to be necessary, it must be universal in the same way as a mathematical expression is understandable by mathematicians worldwide, regardless of their native language. Current systems literature provides little that addresses what is necessary and why there is a requirement for universality in information representation and processing. Our semiotic model, adapted from the existing domain of semiotic models, provides such a universal model, defining it in five levels. View full abstract»

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IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

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San Murugesan
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