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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • The bravest biomedical engineer: Dr. Gottfried Biegelmeier

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 12
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  • Healthcare technology, economics, and policy: an evolving balance

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 16 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
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  • Classification of simple stimuli based on detected nerve activity

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 64 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Describes an interface and a signal processing methodology that use measured neural signals to image overall axonal activity in intact peripheral nerve. Since one of the goals of this research is to create an interface that can eventually be used in both healthy and injured persons, an interfacing methodology that does not rely on nerve transection had to be developed. A cuff electrode containing multiple pairs of differential detectors was used to explore the feasibility of using measured neural signals to image overall axonal activity in intact peripheral nerve. The minimally invasive neural interfacing system (MINIS) consists of four parts: an in vivo multielectrode nerve cuff placed around an intact ensheathed whole nerve, wavelet based signal processing, information-theoretic data summarization, and a cascade correlation neural network. The system was validated using the visual system of Limulus polyphemus (common horseshoe crab). In our application the implantation of the cuff electrode requires surgery to expose the nerve but does not require removal of the sheath and surrounding connective tissue, hence the term "minimally invasive." The trained network for a given specimen was very specific to the specimen-interface-nerve configuration on which the data used to build the training/testing sets originated. When the network becomes overfitted it performs increasingly well at identifying the activity that corresponds to the data on which it was trained while becoming worse with novel data. Though it's doubtful a given source could ever be at the exact centers of all four pairs in a hand-mode cuff, being near the centers impacts the SNR and thus the accuracy for that pattern. Thus far the results are encouraging; however, more work is needed before this system could be used to reliably drive a prosthesis or interact with a virtual environment. View full abstract»

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  • The six-million-dollar dictionary

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 90
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  • The illustrated wavelet transform handbook - introductory theory and applications in science, engineering, medicine and finance [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 92 - 93
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Design of biomedical devices and systems [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 93
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  • Giving much/gaining more: mentoring for success [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 93 - 94
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  • Neural networks and genome informatics (methods in computational biology and biochemistry, volume 1) [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 94
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  • U.S. FDA rules for device investigations

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 95 - 96
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  • Seizure prediction by nonlinear EEG analysis

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 57 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (41)  |  Patents (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (339 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Attempting to increase insight into the spatio-temporal dynamics of the epileptogenic process to address one of the greatest challenges in epileptology. In the field of EEG analysis the search for the hidden information predictive of an impending seizure has a long history. The nonlinear EEG analysis techniques we have used in principle allow one to define a pre-ictal state and to characterize different temporal and spatial aspects of this state. The results obtained so far emphasize the high value of nonlinear EEG analysis techniques for the detection of a long-lasting pre-ictal state. Once given a sufficient sensitivity and specificity of seizure prediction techniques, more extensive clinical studies on a larger population of patients, either at home or in a clinical setting, can be envisaged. View full abstract»

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  • Cost-reducing protein production and delivery for sexually transmitted disease prevention

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 43 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Discusses producing vaccines and antibody proteins from plants with "green vaccines". In passive immunization, antibodies are produced outside the body and manufactured to be active against a specific pathogen (such as herpes virus). With active immunization, one of the major obstacles to cost-reduction is the identification of inexpensive but effective methods for converting the plant cells or tissues into an orally active formulation. View full abstract»

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  • Personal sensors for the diagnosis and management of metabolic disorders

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 32 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
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    Luminescence-based analysis that facilitates the measurement of multiple metabolites from small sample volumes for use in point-of-care or in-home environments. Part of our interest in this project is in patient empowerment-getting patients to assume responsibility and control of their own diseases. Our goal is a Chem-Chip system that is analogous to the present generation of glucose dipsticks and glucometers in terms of ease of use, quality of data, and low cost. If the potential of the Chem-Chip is realized, practically all relevant disease markers over a wide range of molecular weights and concentrations could be quantitatively and specifically measured for disease diagnosis and management. View full abstract»

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  • Cell membrane electropermeabilization with arbitrary pulse waveforms

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 77 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    We present a detailed design of a system for in vitro electropermeabilization with arbitrary waveforms. A low-voltage signal is generated by a programmable function generator and amplified by a bipolar amplifier circuit built from commercial components. We describe the general outline of the setup, give the scheme of the amplifier circuit, and present the frequency characteristics of the system. Unlike the commercially available devices used for electropermeabilization, the system presented in this article provides a custom choice of the pulse waveform, with the amplitude from 0 up to 260 V (520 V peak-to-peak) with a shape distortion below 5% for the band from 500 Hz up to 35 kHz, and below 15% up to 55 kHz. The circuit can deliver currents up to 5.2 A, which, at the maximum output voltage, is obtained on a resistive load of 50 W. For larger loads (lower resistivity), the performance of the circuit is reduced, with a possibility of malfunction. The total cost of the amplifier circuit components is less than US$400, and with programmable function generators starting at approximately US$1,000, this makes the presented design attainable to any laboratory with interest in electropermeabilization. View full abstract»

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  • Worlds apart? Healthcare technologies for lifelong disease management

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 53 - 56
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    When viewed from the developing world, the prospects or implementation of adequate healthcare technologies are dim unless world inequality is corrected. It could be argued that medicine comes secondary to education since it is hardly possible to develop a working program for endemic disease control and better nutrition in populations unable to read and understand directions and measures. Expensive instruments become useless if plugged in the wrong voltage. When the maintenance support base is 5,000 or 10,000 km away, what's the use of transferring any technology?. View full abstract»

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  • For cost-reducing technologies, knowing markets is to change them

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 26 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Benefiting from an understanding of economic and political markets includes recognition that engineers themselves can change these environments. Understanding healthcare and other technology markets includes an understanding that the markets sometimes don't just exist-they are altered and sometimes created by the technology. A less expensive and more effective means to monitor a disease such as PKU enhances the likelihood that insurers will cover costs of such monitoring. Recognizing the complexity of economics and policy recognizes that understanding sometimes comes in a burst of insight but more usually, and surely, builds in steps. Since improvements in quality of life are inadequately captured by the market, will political "markets" develop subsidies or regulations to encourage technology?. View full abstract»

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  • Can technology truly reduce healthcare costs?

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 20 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    Examining the implications of developing substitute medical technologies that are less costly but produce some or better results. A conclusion has to be that, for many medical device technologies, outcome research may at best be irrelevant or, at worst, totally misleading. A randomized trial is generally believed to be the best way to compare the efficacy of two technologies that have the same or similar purpose. View full abstract»

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  • Research on medical applications of nanotechnology in the European Union [Cellular/tissue engineering]

    Publication Year: 2003
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    Discusses research on medical applications of nanotechnology in the European Union. Nanobiotechnology is based on the idea that the ability to design synthetic materials on a nanoscale base toward molecular architecture of biologically relevant molecules will ultimately lead to the integration of artificial and biological matter. This concept has applications in the environment, biomedical sensors, and artificial tissues. Biomaterials and medical devices represent a fast emerging market that is estimated at about US$260 billion worldwide, with Europe's share being about 30%. Biomaterial and tissue engineering research are of high quality and in strong competition with the United States, who is still the world leader. The biomimetic approach to developing advanced materials is a new field that provides different solutions to existing challenges. In all living organisms, nature produces a plethora of materials, architectures, systems, and functions, which have been optimized during a long and tough evolution process. An essential feature of these highly structured materials is their structural organization in many scales, as is the case of ceramics and composites found in animal shells or in bone and dental tissues. View full abstract»

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  • The healthcare technologies management program

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 49 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Developing an engineer's awareness of factors that affect the cost of healthcare technology is discussed. It is concluded that the Healthcare Technologies Management Program offered by Marquette University and the Medical College of Wisconsin is a unique program that meets the unique needs of engineers and their employers. The program prepares new graduate engineers to work in hospitals, medical device companies, and consulting firms, and it provides experienced engineers with the training needed for career advancement. It provides several advantages over graduate business and technical degrees and many benefits to students and their employers. The emphasis of the program can play a role in the reduction of the costs associated with the development of healthcare technology. View full abstract»

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  • De Forest and the first electrosurgical unit

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 84 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    In the United States, Lee De Forest, who patented the first triode vacuum tube (audion) in 1907 and 1908, was experimenting with a high-frequency spark-gap generator for use in surgery and filed a U.S. patent application describing his work on 10 February 1907, which was issued on 17 December 1907. This device was the first electrosurgical unit, and there are no better words than his own in his patent for describing it; he stated: Be it known that I, Lee De Forest, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented a new and useful improvement in Cauteries, of which the following is a specification. My invention relates to devices for producing burning effects by means of high-frequency electrical currents, and more particularly to cauteries employed in surgery. (A cautery is a heated rod used to cut and coagulate living tissue.) I have discovered that when a conductor is attached to any part of a high-frequency oscillating circuit, the high-frequency electrical current passing into a body, for example, a human body, will produce a heating or burning effect at the point of contact of the electrode conveying such currents to said body, and that the intensity of said heating or burning effect is inversely proportional to the terminal area of said electrode. If therefore the electrode ends in a fine point or cutting edge, or relatively small area of other shape, an extremely intense burning effect may be obtained. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope