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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March-April 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • News & Trends - Compromise ends wireless spectrum debate

    Page(s): 6 - 8
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest editor's introduction - Ubiquitous mobile computing

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrating wireless LAN and cellular data for the enterprise

    Page(s): 25 - 33
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    The Internet Roaming solution for corporate wireless data users integrates mobile networking across private WLANs, public WLANs, and cellular data networks. View full abstract»

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  • Attaching context-aware services to moving locations

    Page(s): 43 - 51
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    User information and communication resources - such as precise location information and direction, altitude, light, and humidity measurements (via sensors) - are becoming more available in end devices. This increasing range of information can enable context-aware informational services as well as linking digital objects to physical objects a user is observing. Thus, mobile users can obtain relevant information about real-world objects while simultaneously staying in touch with other users. The author describes an open, scalable service architecture in which context-aware service negotiation lets entities establish communication and negotiate services without a third party's assistance and without advance knowledge of either party's features. Context information can help hide data complexity from users until they need to make choices regarding such things as payments or object interactions. View full abstract»

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  • Economics and the design of open systems

    Page(s): 94 - 96
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Developing Web services for C and C++

    Page(s): 53 - 61
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    gSOAP is a platform-independent development environment for deploying efficient SOAP/XML Web services in C and C++.We implemented the traditional remote procedure calling (RPC stub-skeleton design for gSOAP, producing the RPC stub and skeleton routines for Web service applications at compile time. The RPC stub and skeleton routines are precompiled, which speeds encoding and decoding at runtime. The skeleton routines expose a C and C++ application as a Web service on the Internet and are responsible for binding SOAP/XML request and response messages to the application at runtime. View full abstract»

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  • Being and acting rational [agent design]

    Page(s): 91 - 93
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    Rationality alone is insufficient to specify agent design. Using economic theory, we can program agents to behave in ways that maximize their utility while responding to environmental changes. However, economic models for agents, although general in principle, are typically limited in practice because the value functions that are tractable essentially reduce an agent to acting selfishly. Building a stable social system from a collection of agents motivated by self-serving interests is difficult. Finally, understanding rationality and knowledge requires interdisciplinary results from artificial intelligence, distributed computing, economics and game theory, linguistics, philosophy, and psychology. A complete theory involves semantic models for knowledge, belief, action, uncertainty; bounded rationality and resource-bounded reasoning; commonsense epistemic reasoning; reasoning about mental states; belief revision; and interactions in multiagent systems. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic binding in mobile applications

    Page(s): 34 - 42
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    By separating binding concerns from application logic, the Colomba approach exploits metadata to let mobile applications adapt to dynamic environments. Colomba separates service logic from binding management. This permits developers to code, change, and reuse service components and binding strategies independently of each other. Administrators can express binding strategies at a high level of abstraction in terms of declarative policies. In particular, Colomba supports a dynamic binding management that requires: Context awareness is the knowledge of application-specific attributes, such as user preferences, level of trust, subscribed services, and access device characteristics. Users can refer to a set of resources determined by context information. Location awareness is the knowledge of the physical position of the user or device connection to the network infrastructure. Available resources depend on location information. View full abstract»

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  • Protecting mobile code in the world

    Page(s): 78 - 82
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    Proposed applications for mobile code systems include autonomous shopping agents, autonomic systems, distributed sensor network applications, and interstellar space networks. I argue the case for mobile code systems as the next-generation distributed programming paradigm and discuss the security problems that must be addressed before this vision is practically realizable. The security discussion will focus on protecting mobile code programs that execute in the wild from malicious actions by remote hosts. View full abstract»

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  • The performance presumption [middleware evaluation]

    Page(s): 88 - 90
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    Middleware has a variety of qualities, such as size, cost, complexity, flexibility, and performance. For each application, different qualities are more important than others. Choosing the right middleware means first determining the qualities that matter most for your application, and then evaluating different types of middleware to see how well they meet your requirements. Sounds simple, straightforward, and perhaps even obvious, right? In reality, however, properly evaluating middleware in this fashion can be a nontrivial project that can cost much more time or money than allotted in your budget. It also can require skills and experience that nobody on your staff possesses. Because of the difficulties involved in thoroughly and accurately evaluating middleware, consumers routinely take shortcuts. Perhaps most common among these is avoiding the issue altogether through supplier loyalty: they simply buy or adopt middleware systems based on recommendations from their current middleware supplier. This approach tends to work reasonably well, because it avoids the switching costs associated with moving to a new supplier. Obviously, it requires that you select a supplier that can supply viable middleware systems that survive across the life cycles of multiple technologies, rather than going with a "one-trick pony" that is tied to a single technology. It also works only as long as your supplier's middleware systems actually fulfill your requirements. Of course, supplier or brand loyalty is a general market phenomenon - one that's certainly not limited to middleware. View full abstract»

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  • Internet filtering in China

    Page(s): 70 - 77
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    We collected data on the methods, scope, and depth of selective barriers to Internet usage through networks in China. Tests conducted from May through November 2002 indicated at least four distinct and independently operable Internet filtering methods - Web server IP address, DNS server IP address, keyword, and DNS redirection with a quantifiable leap in filtering sophistication beginning in September 2002. View full abstract»

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  • Scalable P2P search

    Page(s): 83 - 87
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    Although the traditional client-server model first established the Web's backbone, it tends to underuse the Internet's bandwidth and intensify the burden that dedicated servers face as their load increases.' Peer-to-peer computing relies on individual computers' computing power and storage capacity to better utilize bandwidth and distribute this load in a self-organizing manner. In P2P, nodes (or peers) act as both clients and servers, form an application-level network, and route messages (such as requests to locate a resource). The design of these routing protocols is of paramount importance to a P2P application's efficiency: naive approaches - such as Gnutella's flood routing, for example - can add traffic. P2P systems that exhibit the "small world" property - in which most peers have few links to other peers, but a few of them have many - are robust to random attacks, but can be highly vulnerable to targeted ones. P2P computing also has the potential to enhance reliability and fault tolerance because it doesn't rely on dedicated servers.' Each peer maintains a local directory with entries to the resources it manages. It can also cache other peers' directory entries. Important applications of P2P technologies include distributed directory systems, new e-commerce models, and Web service discovery, all of which require efficient resource-location mechanisms. View full abstract»

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  • A robust method for soft IP handover

    Page(s): 18 - 24
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    Multimedia streaming over wireless networks - often called mobile multimedia streaming lets users access music, movie, and news services at any time, regardless of location. Given that multimedia streaming is a key goal of third-generation and future wireless networks, vendors will soon deploy streaming clients in advanced mobile terminals. Current mobile terminals, however, fail to adequately support mobile multimedia communication because wireless networks have high packet-loss rates. To eliminate packet loss during handover, we use a packet path diversity scheme and an end-to-end bicasting mechanism that enables soft IP handover. To offset wireless errors, we use a forward error correction (FEC) scheme and embed it in the bicasting mechanism. Our bicasting method encodes the data stream and then splits it, providing more effective diversity than general bicasting, which sends the same data down both paths.' To support our method, we propose the mobile multimedia streaming protocol (MMSP), a new transport-layer protocol that supports multihoming and bicasting in combination with FEC. View full abstract»

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  • Role-based access control with X.509 attribute certificates

    Page(s): 62 - 69
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    We adapted the standard X.509 privilege management infrastructure to build an efficient role-based trust management system in which role assignments can be widely distributed among organizations, and an XML-based local policy determines which roles to trust and which privileges to grant. A simple Java API lets target applications easily incorporate the system. The Permis API has already proven its general utility in four very different applications throughout Europe. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University