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LCS, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Fiber optic guided weapons

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 18 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1374 KB)  

    The problem posed by fiber-optic data links (FODLs) and the approaches used to address them are discussed in the context of subsystem design, modeling, and dynamic flight testing. With respect to FODL kinematics modeling, four regions are defined and the modeling implications discussed: fiber on the bobbin; the near field, around the peel point; transition zone, between the near and far fields; and the far field, extended from the bobbin. The objectives of technology demonstration projects related to command and control of air vehicles are summarized. The potential utility of optical fiber bandwidth as a means for reducing the complexity of expendable missiles by transferring data-processing functions from the missile to the launch platform is discussed. Insights are offered into operational weapon system effectiveness improvements, which can be achieved through the integration of a FODL system.<> View full abstract»

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  • An FDDI network for tactical applications

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 29 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (956 KB)  

    A fiber-optic tactical local area network (FOTLAN), based on the fiber distributed data interface (FDDI), that supports data packet traffic simultaneously with synchronous traffic is described. The current US Army LAN implementation is examined, and its limitations are highlighted. An overview of a migration path from the current LAN to the ATCCS (Army tactical command and control system) objective system using FOTLAN is presented to demonstrate how such a network can evolve.<> View full abstract»

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  • The fiber-optic high-speed data bus for a new generation of military aircraft

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 36 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1125 KB)  

    The avionic suite for the next generation of military aircraft is being designed with component and module commonality in mind in order to control recurring costs and capitalize on economy of scale. The backbone of the suite fashioned out of these modular building blocks is the fiber-optic bit-serial time-division multiplexed high-speed data bus (HSDB), operating at 50 Mb/s, which provides command and control communications among most of the aircraft subsystems and can be used to provide communications for a fly-by-light flight-control system or for the block transfer of data between mass memories and data processors. The fiber-optic HSDB is examined from the top down, beginning with an overview of the evolution of avionic architectures. A review is given of the standardization activity associated with development of the network, the protocols chosen to implement the desired communication functions, configuration options, and the fiber-optic components used in the bus interfaces or other active nodes of the network. It is believed that the utility of the bus extends beyond aircraft to spacecraft, ships, and land vehicles.<> View full abstract»

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  • SAFENET: the standard and its application

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 46 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (602 KB)  

    The survivable adaptable fiber optic embedded network (SAFENET) program, an effort by the US Navy to develop standard computer network profiles that meet the requirements of navy shipboard mission-critical computer systems, is discussed. The two SAFENET standards currently in development are described. The distinction between them is restricted to the commercial local area network (LAN) upon which each is based. SAFENET I uses the IEEE 802.5 token ring LAN, which operates at 16 Mb/s. SAFENET II uses the fiber distributed data interface (FDDI) LAN, which operates at 100 Mb/s. The SAFENET transmission system, optical power budget, and application methodology are examined.<> View full abstract»

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  • Fiber optics for military aircraft flight systems

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 52 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1376 KB)  

    The technologies required to implement fiber-optic-based, or fly-by-light, flight control systems are considered. Following some historical background, the state of the art in fiber-optic position sensors is reviewed. General requirements are discussed, and wavelength-division digital, time-division digital, two-wavelength analog, chirped intensity-modulated analog, and other sensor configurations are examined. The most prominent and best-developed sensor multiplexing techniques are reviewed. Optically controlled actuators, avionic data buses, wideband transceivers, and fiber-optic cables and connectors are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Fault tolerant topologies for fiber optic networks and computer interconnects operating in the severe avionics environment

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 66 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1306 KB)  

    The history of fiber optics technology development for naval aircraft is reviewed, and the current status of network and fly-by-light flight control development is examined. Fiber-optic component selection for aircraft is addressed, covering the fiber and cables, optical sources, couplers, and connectors. Novel fault-tolerant network topologies for both analog and digital fiber optic transmission, which will permit both packet- and circuit-switched operation of robust fiber optic networks are discussed. The application of smart skin technology, i.e. fibers embedded in composite materials, to optical computer backplanes is briefly considered.<> View full abstract»

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  • Fiber optic sensors for Navy applications

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 81 - 89
    Cited by:  Patents (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (916 KB)  

    The development of a family of sensors to detect a wide range of energy fields by exploiting their effects on the optical signal in a fiber-optic waveguide is examined. Interferometric, acoustic, magnetic, fiber gyro, and intensity-based sensors are considered, and multiplexing arrays of sensors is discussed. The main thrust of the program has been sensors for antisubmarine warfare. Applications include the all-optical towed array (AOTA), fiber-optic planar arrays, bottom-mounted acoustic sensors, magnetometers for fiber-optic magnetic arrays, and rate-of-rotation sensors for attitude, heading, and navigation systems. These require the high sensitivity and performance of phase-based or interferometric sensors. Other applications that can be satisfied with the simpler, less sensitive intensity-based sensors include damage control sensors being developed for shipboard applications and fly-by-light systems for military aircraft.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased production in 1991. The current retitled publication is IEEE LTS.

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