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Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-March 2003

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • 2002 reviewers list

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 111 - 112
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  • Realistic rendering and animation of knitwear

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 43 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2689 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a framework for knitwear modeling and rendering that accounts for characteristics that are particular to knitted fabrics. We first describe a model for animation that considers knitwear features and their effects on knitwear shape and interaction. With the computed free-form knitwear configurations, we present an efficient procedure for realistic synthesis based on the observation that a single cross section of yarn can serve as the basic primitive for modeling entire articles of knitwear. This primitive, called the lumislice, describes radiance from a yarn cross section that accounts for fine-level interactions among yarn fibers. By representing yarn as a sequence of identical but rotated cross sections, the lumislice can effectively propagate local microstructure over arbitrary stitch patterns and knitwear shapes. The lumislice accommodates varying levels of detail, allows for soft shadow generation, and capitalizes on hardware-assisted transparency blending. These modeling and rendering techniques together form a complete approach for generating realistic knitwear. View full abstract»

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  • Approximating digital 3D shapes by rational Gaussian surfaces

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 56 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2173 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A method for approximating spherical topology digital shapes by rational Gaussian (RaG) surfaces is presented. Points in a shape are parametrized by approximating the shape with a triangular mesh, determining parameter coordinates at mesh vertices, and finding parameter coordinates at shape points from interpolation of parameter coordinates at mesh vertices. Knowing the locations and parameter coordinates of the shape points, the control points of a RaG surface are determined to approximate the shape with a required accuracy. The process starts from a small set of control points and gradually increases the control points until the error between the surface and the digital shape reduces to a required tolerance. Both triangulation and surface approximation proceed from coarse to fine. Therefore, the method is particularly suitable for multiresolution creation and transmission of digital shapes over the Internet. Application of the proposed method in editing of 3D shapes is demonstrated. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and rendering of points with local geometry

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 30 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3229 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a novel rendering primitive that combines the modeling brevity of points with the rasterization efficiency of polygons. The surface is represented by a sampled collection of Differential Points (DP), each with embedded curvature information that captures the local differential geometry in the vicinity of that point. This is a more general point representation that, for the cost of a few additional bytes, packs much more information per point than the traditional point-based models. This information is used to efficiently render the surface as a collection of local geometries. To use the hardware acceleration, the DPs are quantized into 256 different types and each sampled point is approximated by the closest quantized DP and is rendered as a normal-mapped rectangle. The advantages to this representation are: 1) The surface can be represented more sparsely compared to other point primitives, 2) it achieves a robust hardware accelerated per-pixel shading - even with no connectivity information, and 3) it offers a novel point-based simplification technique that factors in the complexity of the local geometry. The number of primitives being equal, DPs produce a much better quality of rendering than a pure splat-based approach. Visual appearances being similar, DPs are about two times faster and require about 75 percent less disk space in comparison to splatting primitives. View full abstract»

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  • Computing and rendering point set surfaces

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 3 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (164)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2610 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We advocate the use of point sets to represent shapes. We provide a definition of a smooth manifold surface from a set of points close to the original surface. The definition is based on local maps from differential geometry, which are approximated by the method of moving least squares (MLS). The computation of points on the surface is local, which results in an out-of-core technique that can handle any point set. We show that the approximation error is bounded and present tools to increase or decrease the density of the points, thus allowing an adjustment of the spacing among the points to control the error. To display the point set surface, we introduce a novel point rendering technique. The idea is to evaluate the local maps according to the image resolution. This results in high quality shading effects and smooth silhouettes at interactive frame rates. View full abstract»

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  • Improving the robustness and accuracy of the marching cubes algorithm for isosurfacing

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 16 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (41)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4582 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a modification of the Marching Cubes algorithm for isosurfacing, with the intent of improving the representation of the surface in the interior of each grid cell. Our objective is to create a representation which correctly models the topology of the trilinear interpolant within the cell and which is robust under perturbations of the data and threshold value. To achieve this, we identify a small number of key points in the cell interior that are critical to the surface definition. This allows us to efficiently represent the different topologies that can occur, including the possibility of "tunnels." The representation is robust in the sense that the surface is visually continuous as the data and threshold change in value. Each interior point lies on the isosurface. Finally, a major feature of our new approach is the systematic method of triangulating the polygon in the cell interior. View full abstract»

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  • Frame-to-frame coherent animation with two-pass radiosity

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 70 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1882 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes an efficient method for the production of high quality radiosity solutions which uses an a priori knowledge of the dynamic properties of the scene to exploit temporal coherence. The method is based on a two-pass strategy that provides user-control on the final frame quality. In the first pass, it computes a coarse global solution of the radiosities along a time interval and then, in the second pass, it performs a frame-to-frame incremental gathering step using hardware graphic accelerators. Computing cost is thus reduced because the method takes advantage of frame-to-frame coherence by identifying the changes produced by dynamic objects and by decoupling them from computations that remain unchanged. The input data is a dynamic model of the environment through a period of time corresponding to the same camera recording. The method proceeds by incrementally updating two data structures: a space-time hierarchical radiosity solution for a given interval of time and a hierarchical tree of textures representing the space-time final illumination of the visible surfaces. These data structures are computed for a given viewpoint, either static or dynamic. The main contribution of this work is the efficient construction of the texture tree by identifying the changes produced by dynamic objects and by only recomputing these changes. View full abstract»

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  • Polynomial surfaces interpolating arbitrary triangulations

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 99 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2047 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Triangular Bezier patches are an important tool for defining smooth surfaces over arbitrary triangular meshes. The previously introduced 4-split method interpolates the vertices of a 2-manifold triangle mesh by a set of tangent plane continuous triangular Bezier patches of degree five. The resulting surface has an explicit closed form representation and is defined locally. In this paper, we introduce a new method for visually smooth interpolation of arbitrary triangle meshes based on a regular 4-split of the domain triangles. Ensuring tangent plane continuity of the surface is not enough for producing an overall fair shape. Interpolation of irregular control-polygons, be that in 1D or in 2D, often yields unwanted undulations. Note that this undulation problem is not particular to parametric interpolation, but also occurs with interpolatory subdivision surfaces. Our new method avoids unwanted undulations by relaxing the constraint of the first derivatives at the input mesh vertices: The tangent directions of the boundary curves at the mesh vertices are now completely free. Irregular triangulations can be handled much better in the sense that unwanted undulations due to flat triangles in the mesh are now avoided. View full abstract»

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  • Fast and intuitive metamorphosis of 3D polyhedral models using SMCC mesh merging scheme

    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 85 - 98
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3784 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A very fast and intuitive approach to generate the metamorphosis of two genus 0 3D polyhedral models is presented. There are two levels of correspondence specified by animators to control morphs. The higher level requires the animators to specify scatter features to decompose the input models into several corresponding patches. The lower level optionally allows the animators to specify extra features on each corresponding patch for finer correspondence control. Once these two levels of correspondence are established, the proposed schemes automatically and efficiently establish a complete one-to-one correspondence between two models. We propose a novel technique called SMCC (Structures of Minimal Contour Coverage) to efficiently and robustly merge corresponding embeddings. The SMCC scheme can compute merging in linear time. The performance of the proposed methods is comparable to or better than state-of-the-art 3D polyhedral metamorphosis. We demonstrate several examples of aesthetically pleasing morphs, which can be created very quickly and intuitively. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Visualization techniques and methodologies; visualization systems and software; volume visualization; flow visualization; multivariate visualization; modeling and surfaces; rendering; animation; user interfaces; visual progranuning; applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Leila De Floriani
Department of Computer Science, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering
University of Genova
16146 Genova (Italy)
ldf4tvcg@umiacs.umd.edu