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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 29
  • Notes to accompany a student laboratory experiment on chaos

    Page(s): 123 - 128
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    A set of notes on the nonlinear phenomena of chaos is given that can be directly presented to undergraduate electrical and computer engineering students in a laboratory course. Sufficient detail permits the student to understand the subject of chaos, initially through a numerical study of a simple nonlinear algebraic equation and then through an elementary analytical analysis. An experiment using varactor diodes is described View full abstract»

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  • Persistent errors [in electrical engineering literature]

    Page(s): 144 - 145
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    Two venerable errors found in textbooks since the early days of electrical engineering (namely diode demodulator or envelope detector distortion and power factor definition) are mentioned as examples of what must always be expected. A tentative plan is offered for purging such errors, as they are discovered, from the literature View full abstract»

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  • The first Get Away Special payload and how it grew

    Page(s): 11 - 14
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    In October of 1976, NASA initiated its Get Away Special (GAS) Program to provide space flight experiment opportunities aboard the Space Shuttle for groups with limited means and little or no prior experience in the field. The author describes the project established at Utah State University (USU) in 1977 to develop and fly ten experiments in the first Get Away Special canister (G-001). That project has subsequently evolved into a multiinstitutional program, involving hundreds of university students together with dozens of aerospace and electronics companies and several government agencies View full abstract»

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  • An educational image processing/machine vision system

    Page(s): 129 - 132
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    The author describes an image processing/machine vision that was developed specifically for educational use. Most systems used in educational settings were not designed specifically for such use. In many cases, most of a student's laboratory time is spent learning the particular system in use, rather than the complexities of the assigned algorithm. The IBM PC based system described here, which consists of an adapter card for the PC, a standard black-and-white video camera and monitor, and a collection of image processing algorithms, eliminates this problem. The major advantages of the system described are its low cost and extremely simple programming interface. Both the hardware design of the adapter card and the software interface are described View full abstract»

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  • An approximation for the damping ratio ζ in a second-order system

    Page(s): 145 - 146
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    The authors present a relationship for estimating the value of the damping ratio ζ of a second-order control system from the system's step response. This relationship gives more physical meaning to the damping ratio, such that students have better insight into its significance View full abstract»

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  • The NUSAT I project-government, industry and academia learning together [aerospace education]

    Page(s): 15 - 19
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    In April 1985, the first satellite to be ejected from a Get Away Special (GAS) canister was launched from the shuttle Challenger. This satellite was named NUSAT for Northern Utah SATellite, and due to subsequent projects is now called NUSAT I. The conception, design, construction, and operation of the satellite and ground station was completed with all volunteer labor and very little cost through the unique cooperation of several government agencies, several universities and colleges and many corporations and individuals. A major purpose of NUSAT I was education. The purpose of this paper is to present the educational goals and achievements of this project from the perspective of each of the participants, with the hope it will encourage readers to initiate similar projects View full abstract»

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  • The NASA GAS program: a stepping stone to education

    Page(s): 27 - 30
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    The opportunity to fly an experiment aboard the space shuttle can be a great motivator for learning engineering and science. The nonconventional nature of experimentation in space provides a medium in which faculty, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and undergraduate students can work together, discuss science and technology, and all contribute in a meaningful way. The NASA Get Away Special program provided such an opportunity to WPI faculty and students in the fall of 1982. The result was an interdisciplinary effort that required students and faculty to rethink and relearn basic axioms in science and engineering, and to be innovative in creating new, or adapting old, technologies. The effort produced a flight ready GAS-can, and the lessons learned provided the cornerstone for a much more expansive program to grow large crystals of zeolite in high yield in space for use in many possible industrial applications View full abstract»

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  • The evolution of the WPI Advance Space Design Program-an evolving program of technical and social analysis using the NASA Space Shuttle for engineering education

    Page(s): 20 - 26
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    In December of 1982, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, with the cooperation and support of the Mitre Corporation, initiated a primarily undergraduate educational program to develop experiments to be flown onboard a NASA Space Shuttle. Christened the MITRE WPI Space Shuttle Program, it sponsored the development of five educationally meritorious experiments over a period of four years. Although the experiments were ready to fly in early 1986, the Challenger disaster delayed their flight until the Spring of 1991. The delay notwithstanding, the benefits of the first program were sufficient to justify the development of a second set of experiments. More comprehensive in scope, this new venture, named the Advanced Space Design Program, addresses both technical and social areas of interested related to space flight. The authors present a general historical overview and self-assessment of WPI's space design programs View full abstract»

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  • State-space approach to the bilinear transformation and some extensions

    Page(s): 139 - 142
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    The author presents a method to perform bilinear transformation on the variable in a polynomial or a rational function. The method uses state-space representation and is based on identifying the transformations in state-space framework that correspond to the bilinear transformation. Also, a similar procedure is developed for the inverse transformation, sometimes known as the w-transformation. Some special cases of the bilinear transformation are also discussed. Examples are used to illustrate the method presented here. Combined with powerful software available for matrix computations, these methods should provide a fast way of performing the transformations discussed here View full abstract»

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  • Universal logic implementer: a general purpose tool for a digital logic design laboratory

    Page(s): 39 - 42
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    The authors present a general purpose digital logic implementer, a tool designed to serve as a workstation for laboratory experiments in the digital logic and computer architecture courses taught in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Washington State University. The logic implementer is a versatile tool suitable for a wide spectrum of experiments, from simple gate-level implementation of logic circuits to the implementation of microprogrammed bit-slice processors. The basic features of the logic implementer include generality of applications, easy-to-use environment, and robust, reliable interconnections View full abstract»

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  • Computer-aided design and analysis of linear multivariable control systems using the systematic design approach

    Page(s): 100 - 107
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    A new approach for the design of multivariable feedback control systems in the frequency domain is presented. The techniques handle stability, performance, and robustness aspects of the design problem satisfactorily. The overall approach is systematic and intuitively appealing. A new computer-aided control system design package called SFPACK is developed. This package has implemented the new frequency response design techniques. The package is interactive and command-driven, and it is used as a teaching tool for helping the students to understand the concepts of the design approach. The MAT-LAB-derived control environment in SFPACK is extended to provide the user with an expert system development environment View full abstract»

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  • IIR filter scaling for real-time signal processing

    Page(s): 108 - 112
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB)  

    Students generally have difficulty implementing infinite impulse response filters (IIR) using fixed-point arithmetic. Most of the trouble is with amplitude scaling the filter and representing the coefficients in the fixed-point format. The authors present a systematic procedure for scaling a second-order IIR filter which is used as the basic building block of higher-order filters. A simple simulation program is used to estimate the size of the signals at the summing nodes of the filter section. Once the estimates are known, the filter section can he reliably scaled. The procedure is clarified by implementing a second-order resonant filter on a digital signal processor: the TMS320C25 View full abstract»

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  • The complementary roles of laboratory notebooks and laboratory reports

    Page(s): 133 - 137
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    Experiments can be documented by the complementary use of both laboratory notebooks and laboratory reports. The notebook serves as a chronological repository for experimental details, while the report presents a logical summary of the experiment. Emphasis on proper format and logical content in both notebooks and reports encourages the successful development of technical writing skills. When properly used, laboratory notebooks and laboratory reports interact to improve the quality of both. The authors outline the contents of laboratory notebooks and laboratory reports, and explain how the complementary use of these instruments at the Air Force Academy has resulted in better student writing, better design documentation, and more efficient use of laboratory and computer resources that should carry over into future engineering practice View full abstract»

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  • Computer-aided engineering for computer architecture laboratories

    Page(s): 56 - 61
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    Students coming to senior-level computer architecture courses generally have a substantial background in introductory computer organization, assembly-language programming, and digital-logic design. With this background they are ready to embark on sizable design and implementation projects in computer architecture. The author describes an engineering workstation environment that supports student laboratories in computer architecture. The backbone of this environment is a digital simulator that gives each first-term architecture student the necessary power to produce their own working (simulated) computer View full abstract»

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  • NASA's university engineering programs

    Page(s): 31 - 35
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    While NASA has supported engineering research at universities for many years, much of it has been along prescribed paths of investigation. The author describes how the objective of a newly emerging element of the university engineering programs is to provide a more autonomous element that will enhance and broaden the capabilities in academia, enabling them to participate more effectively in the US civil space program. These programs are an integral part of national policy and the strategy to rebuild the United States space research and technology base; they propose to remedy the decline in qualified space engineers by making long-term commitments to universities aspiring to play a strong engineering role in the civil space program. These programs utilize technical monitors at NASA centers to foster collaborative arrangements, exchange of personnel, and the sharing of facilities between NASA and the universities View full abstract»

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  • SSCSSC: a tool for the teaching of digital circuits

    Page(s): 70 - 75
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    The authors present a computer program to support the teaching of digital circuits. The program is used to describe, synthesize, and simulate combinational and synchronous sequential logic circuits, and to help students in their first contact with automatic synthesis tools. The program runs on both MS-DOS and UNIX machines, and it can be given freely to students for home use to significantly reduce the crowding in laboratories. Care has been taken to provide a friendly interface, so that the user can immediately concentrate on the study of circuits instead of having to learn a new program. The software described by the authors is currently used as a support tool in the course on Digital Circuits for Electronic Engineers at the University of Pisa View full abstract»

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  • Simulation and design of a digital control system with TUTSIM

    Page(s): 76 - 82
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    The author discusses the use of an educational popular continuous simulation language for designing a digital control system. The TUTSIM dynamic simulation program is capable of simulating control systems with a digital controller in the loop. A built-in parameter estimation routine is employed to achieve control parameter optimization. PID control of a first order system with time delay is presented as an illustration of the technique. However, because the optimization is based on simulation of the system at various points in the control parameter space, the method is applicable to nonlinear systems and more complex digital control algorithms. Furthermore, the system error used and the performance index based on the error are easily changed View full abstract»

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  • Development of a practice-oriented radio-frequency design course

    Page(s): 118 - 122
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    Several decades ago, radiofrequency design was an integral subject in many undergraduate electrical engineering curricula. In recent years, however, practice-oriented courses have given way to theoretical presentations of communication theory. Several years ago, industrial recruiters commented to us about the lack of formal training in radiofrequency design methods in undergraduate curricula. In response, the author has developed a course in this area that is strongly oriented towards design principles and their realization into hardware. The underlying philosophy of this course is described, and a syllabus with associated laboratory exercises is presented View full abstract»

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  • A backyard experiment for electromagnetics. I

    Page(s): 142 - 144
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    The author presents an interesting experiment involving the determination of soil conductivity which can be introduced as a homework problem in an introductory course in electromagnetic theory. The experiment utilizes the two important topics of resistance-capacitance analogy and transmission line capacitance treated in typical courses View full abstract»

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  • Microstrip design laboratory

    Page(s): 113 - 117
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    Design concepts, fabrication, measurements, and optimization of a microstrip filter, directional coupler, and amplifier are presented. The microstrip circuit implementation is simple and easily alterable for optimization. Results from an undergraduate laboratory course are presented which show reasonable agreement with design parameters, and the optimization process adds to the educational experience View full abstract»

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  • Magic as a PC layout tool for small budget VLSI circuit design

    Page(s): 52 - 55
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    The authors briefly describe the use of Magic, a CAD layout tool for VLSI circuits developed by the University of California, and how the program has been modified to operate on personal computers View full abstract»

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  • Creating scientific formulae using standard word processors is easy

    Page(s): 138 - 139
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (156 KB)  

    The author describes a method for entering scientific formulae into text using standard word processors. The described technique places a grid matrix on the screen into which the terms of the the equation may be conveniently placed. The technique relies on the use of half line spacing, and nonprintable `keying' characters. The printed results are as good as those that can be obtained by using a dedicated scientific word processor, except for a more limited range of scientific characters. Many word processors, however, allow special characters to be created from graphics symbols View full abstract»

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  • Get Away Special (GAS) educational applications of space flight

    Page(s): 5 - 10
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    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Small Self-Contained Payloads (SSCP) Program, commonly known as the Get Away Special (GAS) Program. One of the prime objectives of the GAS program is to foster enthusiasm in the younger generation in the use of space. The author looks at the history of the program from its initiation through the development phase, its interaction with the educational community, the education-industry relationship, and some educational objectives. The author addresses the programmatic and technical relationships that are established between NASA and the GAS customer, and ends with a brief look into the future View full abstract»

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  • An undergraduate VLSI CMOS circuit design laboratory

    Page(s): 47 - 51
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    The author describes a structured, 13-week series of laboratory exercises which demonstrates very large scale integrated (VLSI) CMOS digital circuit design and simulation for undergraduates in electrical engineering. He also suggests cost effective measures that could make the laboratory exercises economically feasible for vocational schools, colleges, and universities View full abstract»

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  • The PC as a productivity tool in the microprocessor laboratory

    Page(s): 62 - 69
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    The PC microcomputer can serve as a host system for developing microprocessor-based products. The educational potential for the PC is investigated citing the low cost and widespread availability of systems and PC-hosted products to facilitate hardware and software design. New laboratory methodologies result which prevent students from getting bogged down in learning the basic functions of an expensive and unique name-brand development system. By focusing lab activities on the PC and a powerful set of add-on tools students readily undertake the synthesis of complete projects, working from concept to product View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University