By Topic

Pervasive Computing, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Oct.-Dec. 2002

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Wearable computing: is it just hype? [From the Editor in Chief]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 2 - 3
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1022 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • What knows where you are?

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 4 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2357 KB)  

    What's been the biggest change when it comes to personal security? Indisputably, the advent of the cellular phone. In daily life as well, whether reporting suspicious activity or touching base with the kids, more and more people rely on their wireless phones. Cellular service in the US has grown slowly and steadily, with subscribers increasing by 30 to 40 per cent a year. However, cellular callers can be at a disadvantage when dialing 911. The phone being mobile rules out a simple database relationship between phone number and location. This means that 911 calls made from wireless phones don't automatically reach the closest emergency service and that the response time can be far longer. In 1996, concerned policymakers responded with Enhanced 911 (E-911) legislation. Phase one of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) directive specified that by April 1998, wireless carriers had to be able to report a wireless 911 caller's telephone number and the receiving antenna's location. The article looks at some of the technical difficulties still encountered, people tracking devices, privacy, and smart card/wireless devices merger. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mobile and wireless networks and applications [Education & Training]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 9 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2374 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author describes an introductory graduate course on mobile and wireless networks and applications at Stanford University. This course has achieved notable success in combining research and education. The course focuses on how the mobility of users and devices affects networks, systems, and applications. The course considers mobility's influence on multiple layers of the protocol stack, from medium access control to applications. The course also considers systems issues such as security and privacy, file systems, resource discovery, resource management including energy, and personal online identities. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Wearable computing goes live in industry

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 14 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4568 KB)  

    Explores field deployments of wearable pervasive computers, looking to, understand their operational characteristics and gain insight into deployment issues. We study one characteristic group of early adopters among mobile knowledge workers who construct, maintain, and repair technically complex, costly systems such as ships, airliners, and telecommunication networks. While this type of application is far from the only way to use wearable computers, significant and successful field deployments of this kind have emerged. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Application design for wearable and context-aware computers

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 20 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2978 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To effectively integrate wearable computers into ubiquitous computing environments, we must address several important challenges. How do we develop social and cognitive application models? How do we integrate input from multiple sensors and map them to users' social and cognitive states? How do we anticipate user needs? How do we interact with users? To address mobile-application design challenges, the authors created four user interface models that map problem-solving capabilities to application requirements. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The evolution of Army wearable computers

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 30 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3273 KB)  

    In 1989, the US Army envisioned a small wearable computer to assist soldiers with battlefield tasks. The concept has since grown from preliminary prototypes and a demonstration Soldier's Computer into the current Land Warrior program and proposals for future systems. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Designing a new form factor for wearable computing

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 42 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (816 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite significant improvements in underlying technologies, the wearable computing field is still in its youth. The article offers several methods that can help accelerate the process from vision to product. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Wireless user interface components for personal area networks

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 49 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3327 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless wearable systems allow new user interface components. We highlight two-TiltType, a wrist-mounted device for text I/O, and phicons, objects whose physical appearances are metaphors for their electronic capabilities. Artifacts like these can create smaller, simpler, easier wearable systems. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Creating experiences with wearable computing

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 56 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3780 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wearable computing promises to deliver a rich variety of engaging user experiences that enhance everyday activities and situations through context-sensitive media and interaction. A Walk in the Wired Woods illustrates how we might design such experiences and deliver them in collaboration with artists and musicians. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The cloak of invisibility: challenges and applications

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 62 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (852 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Is it possible to create a cloak of invisibility - a flexible artifact that can make anything inside it invisible and preserve invisibility despite mobility and deformation? Exploring the algorithmic and technological challenges involved reveals tantalizing information. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A middleware infrastructure for active spaces

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 74 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (324)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1256 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper discusses the Gaia metaoperating system which extends the reach of traditional operating systems to manage ubiquitous computing habitats and living spaces as integrated programmable environments. Gaia exports services to query, access, and use existing resources and context, and provides a framework to develop user-centric, resource-aware, multidevice, context-sensitive, and mobile applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The .NET Compact Framework

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 84 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The .NET Compact Framework lets developers easily and efficiently build robust applications that call XML Web services, thereby letting end users effectively access remote data, cache it locally for use when offline, and interact with it via rich user interfaces. This paper highlights the .NET Compact Framework's design goals, sheds light on what the first version contains, and speculates on future directions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Attention, memory, and wearable interfaces

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 88 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (261 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper considers the limits of human attention and how wearable interfaces should be developed to complement, not interfere, with normal human capabilities. Most interfaces on desktop computers do not have this problem; desktop interface designers can assume that the user is solely concentrating on the digital task. However, a major advantage of a wearable is that users can take it anywhere and use it anytime. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 2002 Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (178 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

All aspects of current mobile computing research and applications development, including architectures, support services, algorithms and protocols, mobile environments, mobile communication systems, applications, emerging technologies, and societal impacts.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dr. Roy Want
Intel Research