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Oceanic Engineering, IEEE Journal of

Issue 2 • Date April 1979

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 0
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 37
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Closing editorial

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 38 - 39
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An information system on environmental conditions for the construction and operation of a storm-surge barrier

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 40 - 45
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    In order to safeguard the southwestern part of The Netherlands against flooding, a storm-surge barrier is being constructed at the entrance of the Eastern Scheldt estuary. Both the construction and the operational control of the barrier require an extensive information system on the meteorological and oceanographical conditions. To provide for the requested data, a large number of recording stations is being set up in the estuary, as well as offshore in the North Sea. Information from these recording stations, such as data on tides, waves, currents, salinity, wind, etc., is transmitted towards a central data processing center. Here further processing will take place for control purposes, preparation of predictions on tides, waves, and meteo conditions, as well as for various studies on the water motion in the estuary. The paper also gives a general outline of the specifications and the laboratory and field tests for the various instruments that are considered necessary, in order to cope with the harsh conditions in the Eastern Scheldt View full abstract»

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  • A distributed microprocessor architecture for fixed and mobile acoustic array adaptive beam forming

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 46 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB)  

    This paper presents a state-of-the-art approach to an important sonar signal-processing problem, A theoretical foundation for source oriented beam forming (SOBF) is presented. A distributed processing element is introduced, discussed, and offered as one solution to the at-sea platform implementation of high-powered digital signal processing such as SOBF. While many of the details of the implementation are beyond the scope or intent of this paper, they may be found in the references (those references not in the open literature are obtainable from the authors). View full abstract»

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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): c4
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  • Extension of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technique to undersea applications

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 60 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (1)
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    This paper presents results on the extension of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) technique to underwater mapping applications. Due to the modest propagation speed of acoustic waves in water, the areal-mapping rate is found to be limited. A number of approaches are discussed in the paper which have the potential of significantly increasing the mapping rate. The map resolutions, both in azimuth and range, are derived for a synthetic array system employing multiple elements. The digital processing requirements, such as the complex multiplication rate and memory size are determined. It was found that the digital signal-processing requirements for many viable mapping systems are within the capability of existing processing hardware. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal estimation of ship's attitudes and attitude rates

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB)  

    Estimation of ship rotational motions induced by ocean waves plays a central role in many navigation and fire control applications. Inertial-type instruments are available which give good measurements of the attitude, but some form of signal processing is necessary to obtain angular rates or predict attitudes. Using optimal moving-average (or transversal) filters, we can obtain very good estimates of attitude rates as well as predictions of these values. Filter parameters can be changed adaptively to maintain good performance as the ship changes heading or velocity. The problem of designing these optimal filters is examined in detail and numerical results are given for a particular set of conditions. Two implementations of the adaptive filter are discussed. One is based on a recursive estimation of the process autocorrelations with the filter coefficients being recomputed at periodic intervals or whenever nonstationary conditions are detected. The second implementation is based on Widrow's LMS algorithm. Both alternatives for the adaptive filter implementation are quite reasonable in terms of their computational requirements. The steady-state performance analysis can be considered to be a lower bound on the errors incurred by an adaptive filter. View full abstract»

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  • Laser sand detector

    Publication Year: 1979 , Page(s): 63 - 65
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    Laboratory measurements are presented showing how a laser sand detector (LSD) can be used to discriminate between bubbles and sand, because sand depolarizes light, whereas bubbles do not. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering (ISSN 0364-9059) is published quarterly by the IEEE Oceanic Engineering Society (IEEE OES). The scope of the Journal is the field of interest of the IEEE OES, which encompasses all aspects of science, engineering, and technology that address research, development, and operations pertaining to all bodies of water. This includes the creation of new capabilities and technologies from concept design through prototypes, testing, and operational systems to sense, explore, understand, develop, use, and responsibly manage natural resources.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
N. Ross Chapman
School of Earth & Ocean Sciences
University of Victoria
3800 Finnerty Road
Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 Canada
chapman@uvic.ca