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Antennas and Propagation Society Newsletter, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date June 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • This issue [entire issue]

    Page(s): 1 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3457 KB)  

    This item presents the entire issue as a single PDF file. View full abstract»

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  • Editor's comments

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A message from the president

    Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • PWS Scattering computation

    Page(s): 4 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (637 KB)  

    Recently, due to the ability of a computer to perform two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transformations via the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) algorithm and its capability to perform numerical integrations, Plane Wave Spectrum (PWS) Scattering techniques have become practical. The PWS scattering analysis represents a radiating source by a twodimensional spectrum of plane waves and characterizes a scatterer by its PWS scattering matrix. The scattered field is then obtained by calculating the integral of the inner product of the incident PWS and the scattering matrix. This calculation is, in effect, a 2D integration performed over the set of incident plane waves. It is the objective of this article to demonstrate that this analysis is, in fact, simple and straightforward. Several examples will be presented wherein simple scattering models, such as Physical Optics, have been used to describe the PWS scattering matrix and thus calculate the scattered field with good results. Also, the technique is both straightforward and powerful for the analysis of antenna coupling in the presence of obstacles. These examples demonstrate that the PWS Scattering Matrix method is a practical and cost effective approach to the analysis of many near-field scattering problems. View full abstract»

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  • Letters to the editor

    Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Diabolic reflections

    Page(s): 19 - 20
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • It's your job

    Page(s): 22 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reviews and abstracts - IEEE standard test procedures for antennas

    Page(s): 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (115 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reviews and abstracts - An H-field solution for a conducting body of revolution

    Page(s): 28 - 29
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    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • Message from the AP-S transactions editor's desk

    Page(s): 34
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine covers all areas relating to antenna theory, design, and practice.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 1989. The current retitled publication is IEEE Antennas & Propagation Magaine.

Full Aims & Scope