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Parts, Hybrids, and Packaging, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date September 1972

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Who's Who in G-PHP

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 2
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  • Foreword: Special Issue on Hybrid Microelectronics

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Determination of the Relative Nitrogen Doping Level of Tantalum Nitride Resistor Film by Means of the Seebeck Effect

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 16 - 21
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  • Use of Lead Dioxide Counterelectrodes in Thin-Film Capacitors: The TLM Compacitor

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 33 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Physical and Electrical Properties of Thin-Film Barium Titanate Prepared by RF Sputtering on Silicon Substrates

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 11 - 15
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    Thin films of barium titanate in the range of 0.2 to 1.25 microns were successfully grown by RF sputtering on doped silicon substrates with resistivities of 0.002 Omeg \bullet cm to 0.25 Omeg \bullet cm . Two types of film crystal structures were achieved: 1)mixed orientation growth; and 2) preferred orientation growth along the < 100 > axis. The film stoichiometry was very much dependent on film structure during deposition. The effective crystallite size and nonuniform strain were also found to depend on the initial growth conditions. The electrical properties of these films were strongly influenced by the initial growth conditions and physical structure. The following are some of the important electrical properties: relative dielectric constant-110 to 215; loss factor-l.8 to 5.0 percent; electrical resistivity-lO10to 1013 Omeg \bullet cm; and dielectric breakdown->lO5V/cm. View full abstract»

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  • A New AC Sputtering Technique for the Deposition of Thin Films

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 7 - 10
    Cited by:  Patents (2)
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    An ac sputtering technique is described which utilizes an array of tubular target electrodes. Reduced substrate heating is achieved by a combination of efficient cooling of the target electrodes and the unique geometry of the target array. Because substrate heating is reduced, capacitor grade beta-tantalum films have been deposited at 450 Å/min; a two-fold increase over maximum deposition rates for such films in a conventional dc sputtering process. Alloy films can be conveniently deposited with this ac sputtering method. The alloy composition is selected and controlled by electrical means. This concept has bean successfully applied to the deposition of tantalum-aluminum alloy films. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis and Development of a Thermocompression Bond Schedule for Beam Lead Devices

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 22 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    To obtain consistent and reliable beam lead device attachment by thermocompression bonding, it is necessary to determine an allowable range of bonding parameters over which the mechanical integrity of the device attachment is optimized. This paper discusses the practical considerations of beam lead wobble tool bonding, and describes the theoretical and experimental techniques which were used to establish the critical bonding variables. Using these techniques a bond schedule has been developed in terms of only two variables, bond force and interface temperature. View full abstract»

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  • A Comparison of the Strength of Alumina Substrates for Different Separation Techniques

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 4 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Carbon dioxide lasers arc widely used to separate alumina sheet into individual substrates for hybrid microcircuits. Laser separation offers several advantages over other conventional techniques; however, the effects on the flexural strength of the alumina have not previously been investigated. The flexural strength of alumina substratas separated by CO2, Q-switched YAG, and pulsed YAG lasers and diamond sewing are compared. The Q-switched YAG laser technique produced substrates 45 percent stronger than the CO2and pulsed YAG laser techniques, and 13 percent stronger than the diamond saw method. View full abstract»

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  • Explosive Bonding of Electrical Interconnections

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 27 - 32
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    Primary explosive systems, as described, are now being used as a safe and predictable energy source to bond metals on a size scale comparable to microcircuit electrical interconnections. Basic primary explosive reaction characteristics have been analyzed and related to effective bond mechanisms for solid-phase explosive bonding of several metal combinations. Methods and materials systems were devised to accurately deposit a specific quantity and configuration of explosive with predetermined reaction characteristics. This has permitted a significant advance in use of explosive bonding on a microscale. The theoretical explosive bonding mechanism is supported by experimental data. Included in considerations are surface jetting characteristics which influence interface structures and are responsible for removing surface oxides and contaminants. A large variety of similar and dissimilar metal pairs was joined reliably and repeatedly with bond strengths greater than those of the parent metals. Explceive bonding advantages and disadvantages considering materials and bonding equipment requirements are cited. View full abstract»

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  • Thermal Chip Evaluation of IC Packaging

    Publication Year: 1972 , Page(s): 39 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    In order to experimentally evaluate the thermal effects of changes in integrated circuit (lC) packaging, a thermal chip was designed and tested. The thermal chip replaces a working chip in an lC package. It provides a method for measurement of temperatures on a chip where the heat input simulates that of a working chip. Temperature distribution can be obtained by making measurements at 16 locations on the chip. It further provides simulation of the distribution of heat input on a working chip by providing 16 locations for individually controlled heat input. (In fact, there are 32 transistors, grouped in 16 closely spaced pairs, each of which can be powered individually to act as either a "thermometer" or as a heat source thereby giving flexibility to match a working power array). An important feature of this design is the ability to obtain a chip temperature distribution when the chip is encapsulated or mounted facedown. Chip-to-substrata thermal resistances for filled and unfilled epoxy bonding materials were measured. Chip-to-coolant thermal resistances for face-mounted and beck-mounted multibond chips (with beam-type leads) are included. The thermal chip was found to be an effective tool for measuring the temperature distribution on a chip under different power, packaging, and cooling configurations. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1977. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope