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Component Parts, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Mar 1957

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • The Application of Pulse-Forming Networks

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 7 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (904 KB)  

    This paper is intended to aid engineers-especially modulator and component engineers with their pulse-forming network application problems. The discussion includes an analysis of the circuitry in which pulse-forming networks are used, a discussion of case size limiting parameters, and a procedure indicating the calculations required to determine the approximate case size of new network requirement. View full abstract»

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  • Sealing Metal and Ceramic Parts by Forming Reactive Alloys

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 28 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB)  

    Metal and ceramic parts are sealed by introducing a molten solder or by inserting a thin sheet of metal that will form a reactive alloy. A wide choice of materials can be used, including many that seal at high temperatures with little metallic evaporation. Materials can be used that can be predegassed at temperatures considerably above those used for final sealing. The seals can be made in vacuum or in an inert gas. The parts can be stacked one on the other so that a multiplicity of seals can be made at the same time. By using a metal such as titanium, and ceramic parts having an expansion characteristic similar to that of titanium, seals can be made that are strong and can operate for many hours at temperatures as high as 800°C. View full abstract»

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  • Sendust Flake- A New Magnetic Material for Low-Frequency Application

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 2 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (952 KB)  

    A high permeability, low-loss core was prepared by compacting Sendust flakes, which were produced by warm rolling Sendust powder. Sendust, a brittle magnetic alloy of iron, silicon, and aluminum, was discovered by the Japanese in 1936 and is used extensively by them in cast and powder form. The low permeability values (70-80) of Sendust powder cores precluded their acceptance in this country to any extent. The improved magnetic properties of the new flake cores, called Flakenol I, make them an attractive nonstrategic substitute for applications which now require powdered high nickel alloys. The permeability values as measured on compacts of this newflake core ranged from 150-280, with electrical losses as low as present powder cores. The very low eddy-current loss coefficient value measured on Sendust flake cores indicates their usefulness at higher frequencies than possible for present high permeability powder cores. The flake cores, which have a negative temperature coefficient of permeability, were stabilized by the addition of Alfenol flake material. The comparatively simple techniques for processing Sendust flake cores from the cast alloy are described, along with the factors which most influence their ultimate magnetic characteristics. View full abstract»

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  • A Novel Construction Concept for Linear Delay Lines

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 24 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (728 KB)  

    Previous attempts to design lumped parameter delay lines having linear phase characteristics required the use of compensating capacitors or coils. This paper presents a novel concept in construction techniques which results in a linear phase delay line without the necessity of resorting to any compensating components. A step-by-step design procedure for a low-loss linear delay line is used to illustrate this new construction technique. This novel line has a nominal characteristic impedance of 500 ohms, delay of l0 microseconds, low attenuation, and a cutoff frequency of 4 megacycles. This new work is based upon the theoretical treatment of the ideal low-pass filter by Golay;1the ideal parameter relationships have been reduced to practical design considerations involving unique geometric placements of ferrite cored components. View full abstract»

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  • Environmental Effects on Precision Potentiometers

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 18 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1080 KB)  

    Current trends in design of military equipment have imposed on precision potentiometer manufacturers the necessity of meeting rigid environmental requirements. To fulfill these requirements, the authors' company inaugurated a test program to determine causes and effects of severe environmental conditions on precision potentiometer performance. This paper is based on results obtained during three years of this program. The goals of this program were: 1) to determine the effects of increasingly severe environments on performance, 2) to determine what design changes were required to give the desired performance. Special test techniques applicable to precision potentiometers were developed and potentiometer characteristics affected by each environment were determined. Where design improvements in current models were found to be inadequate, the design of a new line of potentiometers using improved techniques and materials resulted in the desired im- provement. View full abstract»

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  • The Insulation Resistance of Capacitors After Long-Time Electrification

    Publication Year: 1957 , Page(s): 14 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB)  

    In recent months design engineers have been interested in capacitors with extremely high values of insulation resistance not normally achieved in the common one- or two-minute electrification period. After long periods of electrification, insulation resistance values in the order of 100-million megohm microfarads and more can be achieved with some types of capacitors. Such high values can be accurately measured by the special measuring technique described in this paper, which also discusses the interpretation of test data taken at various temperatures and voltages on some typical Mylar capacitors. The concepts of instantaneous and equivalent parallel insulation resistance are developed and their significance discussed. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1962. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope