By Topic

Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date Dec 1975

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • A New Real-Time Function Test Generation System for Complex LSI Testing

    Page(s): 52 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB)  

    This paper discusses the applications and architectural features of a sequential pattern generator designed for a general-purpose high-speed large-scale integration (LSI) test system. This system provides enhanced capabilities for testing communications-microprocessor-oriented LSI devices which require long test patterns and flexible input-output (I-O) control of individual pins. Salient features discussed are a 10 MHz random access memory with an 80-bit word size and controller capable of 100 ns subroutine calls and loops in unlimited numbers. Also, individual pin changes such as I-O states, timing, and waveform format at 10 MHz rates are de- scribed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Concept of Factory Automation

    Page(s): 56 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    Currently, many manufacturing functions are automated through the use of computers and associated equipment. The support of ,administrative functions such as material and labor control to regulate costs and measure results is aided by the use of medium to large computers at the plant site or through communications to a central computer site. The control of processes, such as testing and assembly, are improved through the use of mini- and microprocessors' as well as programmable controllers. The engineering problem solving and design now involve the use of hand-held and desktop calculators as well as time-shared and remote processing on a central computer. All of these things have but one basic goal: cost effective manufacturing. This article outlines one possible path for advancement toward that goal, based on existing applications and computer systems capabilities. As always, the final challenge is related to our ability to cost effectively design and implement the processes which use the tools we have or can acquire. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Trend Toward Standardization and Automation in Manufacturing

    Page(s): 59 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1560 KB)  

    The design of electronic products has been revolutionized, in recent years, by the introduction of various "state-of-the-art" concepts and technology changes. This continually accelerating trend of technical innovation has, perhaps, had a tendency to cloud the significance and relative importance of some of the fundamental concepts involved in the expression "producibility of design." "Producibility," specifically with respect to the cost connotations implied, is necessarily associated with standardization of materials, components, and operations which, in turn, become the basis for extended mechanization and automation of the operations. A corollary to this process is the necessity for improved data management at the design-manufacturing interface and, in a sense, the standardization and automation of the data and data handling techniques involved. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Automatic Test Equipment in the Production Process

    Page(s): 48 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (728 KB)  

    Automatic test equipment for 100 percent incoming inspection of electronic devices is inexpensive enough and effective enough today that sample testing no longer makes sense for most quality-control organizations. Although component manufacturers normally perform 100 percent inspection--at least in the early stages of manufacture--there are a great many ways in which errors can be passed along to the user. As a result, incoming digital integrated circuits (IC's) may have error rates as high as 5 percent and, for linear ICes, rejection rates may be up to 10 percent. Nor do acceptable quality levels (AQL's) provide a positive assurance of the quality of a lot, as is pointed out in an appendix. Break even is basically the point at which the cost of testing meets the cost of not testing. It is often expressed as the number of units that must be tested per year to justify a piece of automatic test equipment. Both the cost of testing and the cost of not testing can be calculated quite easily once the various factors to be used are considered. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In-Circuit Test Systems-An Evolution

    Page(s): 42 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1016 KB)  

    This paper surveys the development of in-circuit testing over the past decade and examines the reasons as to why this production floor technique for test and fault diagnosing of printed wiring assemblies has taken hold. Both controller based and minicomputer based in-circuit test systems are discussed, and reasons are advanced as to why minicomputer based in-circuit systems are becoming popular. Some of the reasons presented are their ability to employ the simple programming languages such as Basic. Moreover, users may readily add functional testing to a minicomputer based in-circuit test system by interfacing some of the programmable instruments now on the market with the input-output bus and the in-circuit test fixture. It is also pointed out that minicomputer based in-circuit test systems provide the capability to generate in-circuit test Programs by an operator, unschooled in minicomputer programming, who merely enters data from engineering documents. A test program generator generates the tests in the proper testing sequence. The paper Concludes with a discussion as to how in-circuit and functional testing can be combined effectively for optimizing test and fault diagnostic capability. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Perfect Machines Replace Fallible Men? Caveat Emptor!

    Page(s): 33 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (720 KB)  

    Starting with huge one of a kind expensive systems designed for the military, there exists today a large variety of commercial equipment which does the same basic job for a lot less money. System sophistication varies from go/no-go testors to diagnostic systems which lead the operator to the defective component. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Industry and Computers

    Page(s): 37 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1120 KB)  

    The use of computers by industry in operations and products is undergoing a fundamental change. The change has been made possible by technological advances in integrated circuits and software. Cost and performance trends of small (mini) and large (maxi) computers are such that future systems will be distributed and hierarchical. Both computer power and data bases (mass storage) will be distributed. The hierarchy will cover from business host functions to control on the factory floor. The integrated and on-line nature of future systems promises to increase greatly the timeliness and quality of operational data available to decision makers and lead to increased productivity. The information structure of manufacturing information and control systems will be applicable to the products of some companies. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1977. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope