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Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date June 1973

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  • Systems Tracking

    Page(s): 12 - 14
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    An automated system has been developed by the Industrial Engineering group at IBM's System Products Division plant in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., to TRACK the serialized bases of any product by comparing customized targets to actual labor claims. The system expedites identification of the specific factor that contributed to an overtarget situation. The concepts of TRACK, which consist of Fortran IV and PL/1 programs under OS, are being incorporated into a plant-wide programming system called ATLAS (Actual Target Labor Auditing System}. View full abstract»

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  • Computing an Average Cost Allocation for Interrelated Operations

    Page(s): 15 - 22
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    An important goal in the analysis of a sequential manufacturing process, such as the production of integrated circuits, is to identify those operations which have the greatest potential for cost reduction. One method for making this identification compares the existing production line to a target line composed of "optimal" operations and then allocating an appropriate portion of the difference in cost to each of the operations. For instance, you could choose a fixed sequence in which to optimize individual operations and assign to each operation the incremental cost recovered by its upgrading. However, because of the interdependence of manufacturing operations, this cost allocation may vary with the sequence selected. A method of eliminating this sequence-dependence is to average the cost allocation over the set of all possible upgrading sequences. Here we present an efficient method for computing these averaged allocations for a common type of manufacturing process. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1977. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope