By Topic

Production Techniques, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date September 1956

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Message from the Editor

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (125 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial:Electronic Production Techniques

    Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial:Mechanized Production of Electronics

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (126 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial:Automation the Path to Reliability

    Page(s): 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Our First Two Years in Retrospect

    Page(s): 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Chairman's Notebook and National News

    Page(s): 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (118 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • One more step ...

    Page(s): 8 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Economics of Automation --- Some Important Considerations

    Page(s): 34 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)  

    It is suggested that both the machinery builder and the user need to know the savings reflected in the end product. The "break-even point" is described as the time when the variable costs due to automation are less then the variable manual costs, by the amount of the automation capital investment. A break-even load curve relates savings during a regular 8-hour day to a longer or shorter working day. By observing the distinctions between fixed costs and variable costs and by using conservative estimates, the capabilities of the Mini-Mech system are presented. Three years is suggested as the useful life for electronic automation equipment, in contrast with the usual 15-year amortization period for other machinery, and with some confidence that the Internal Revenue Service will see eye-to-eye with the user. It is estimated that the Mini-Mech system might require an initial total investment of $25,000; machinery modification costs are estimated at 50% of this figure over the three-year period, as component parts and techniques are improved. At an insertion rate of 24 component parts per minute, the quoted variable saving is approximately $275 per day, and with a break-even point at 123 days. It is stated that, up to this point, hand methods are cheaper as a result of lower fixed costs; but beyond this point, machine methods are cheaper since accrued variable-cost savings will have liquidated the higher fixed costs of the automatic equipment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Development of Systems of Mechanized Assembly

    Page(s): 23 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2016 KB)  

    It is pointed out that the radio-making machine of John Sargrove and the serigraphic methods of Brunetti and Khouri have repeatedly stimulated product engineering since 1946. The Sargrove method is briefly described. The early work of Snyder on printed wiring is discussed, and a unitized telemetering channel assembly -- of 1947 vintage - is shown. The author poses the complex question of whether to stock parts, assemblies, or complete units -- a prerequisite aspect to mechanized design which yet remains unanswered in both military and civilian electronics. As a general approach, however, a unitized type of construction is described as having a considerable long-range validity in terms of servicing, transferring of heat, and ease of sub-assembling. The early work by Danko on dip soldering is mentioned, and hot-peel strength data for foilclad laminates is presented. Early work on the printed wiring socket is outlined, and the flexible printed circuit shown at the 1951 IRE National Convention is reviewed. Attention is giveh to a study using limited printed wiring, and standard art and practices, as sponsored by the Wright Air Development Center. Using a transformer coupled intercomm as a vehicle, a common module was chosen -- fixed in cross section but graduated stepwise in length, so the component parts could be stacked. A wrap-around flexible circuit was designed which was adaptable to automation using a cam-operated multihead soldering machine. A mechanical lock of the component parts before soldering, and the importance of accessibility are stressed in the development. The paper is concluded with a series of curves on rejection percentages and on variables controlling printed circuits. A plea is made for the establishment of standard practices -- a role already begun by Various RETMA committees. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Solderless Wrapped Connection

    Page(s): 12 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1752 KB)  

    The solderless wrapped connection is introduced. The terms automatic factory and assembly are defined. Electronic industry growth over the last 30 years is discussed and its expansion during the next 10 years is predicted at 300 percent. The importance of modular building blocks and modular terminal spacing, in the program of standardization for automation, is emphasized. The solid-wire solderless wrapped connection is examined; hand wrapping tools, a wrapping gun and wrapping techniques are discussed. The high contact pressure principle is developed and documented by several photographs, drawings, arid curves. Data is presented concerning the relaxation of contact-tension with time and temperature. It is shown that tension reaches the 50 percent point in times varying from three hours (at 170 degrees C) to 40 years (at 57 degrees C). Reliability of the solderless wrapped connection and that of the solder connection are compared under vibration. Other advantages of the solderless wrapped connection are tabulated. Some applications to the wiring of telephone trunk circuit panels and general rack-and-panel wiring installations are given. Mr. Mallina concluded his talk by showing a motion picture of the wrapping gun in action. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1959. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope