Scheduled System Maintenance:
On Monday, April 27th, IEEE Xplore will undergo scheduled maintenance from 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM ET (17:00 - 19:00 UTC). No interruption in service is anticipated.
By Topic

Component Parts, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Mar 1963

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Microminiaturized Thin-Film Diode Matrices

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 10 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    This paper describes the fabrication and testing of microminiaturized thin-film switching matrices made of thin-film titanium oxide diodes. The binary-to-decimal converters will find especially useful application in slow switching display devices. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Glass in Electronics

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 23 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1488 KB)  

    While glass has many applications in the electronics means of "chemical machining" of photosensitive glasses. The field, five classifications serve to cover them all. The wide range of latter approach is widely applied to the making of printed wiring applications which exist is attributable to the wide range of properties boards. which can be obtained in glasses. Historically, the use of glass for its dielectric properties dates Sealability and impermeability of glasses have enabled them to back 200 years. The material is presently finding acceptance in maintain prominence in use for enclosures, starting with Edison's laminated capacitors where the end use demands utmost reliability. lamps and carrying through to today's electrostatic printing tubes. Glasses which can be sealed into laminated structures, then One recent sealing achievement was the simplification of color devitrified so as to develop ferroelectric properties, are now receiving television picture tube assembly by use of a relatively new material, attention. Devitrifying solder glass. Glass fibers as small as 8 microns in diameter are utilized in Structural and supporting parts may be made in intricate and various electronic and optical devices; cathode-ray tube trace complex shapes by means of the "multiform" process and by widths as small as 0.001 inch are obtainable by use of fibers in the tube faceplates. Bundles of fibers have been made to serve as signal pickoffs in certain ultrasonic delay line systems which take advantage of both the optical properties and some unusual acoustical properties of glass. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Inductor Size vs. Q: A Dimensional Analysis

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 31 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    Equations are derived and curves are plotted showing the change in Q of an inductor as a function of a change in size. The approach used is to assume the existence of a model having a fixed inductance and operating under a fixed set of conditions. A change in size is introduced by a magnification-type enlargement or shrinkage of all outline dimensions by the factor "a." Assuming a constant effective permeability and readjusting the number of turns to maintain inductance constant results in the elimination of "n," the relative number of turns. With the further assumption of a constant copper space factor, the relative copper losses (in the absence of core losses) determine the relative Q as a function of relative size. Copper losses with skin effect and with solid conduction are considered. The same approach is used to derive equations of relative size vs relative Q for a pure core-loss inductor. For this purpose, core losses are approximated by a straight-line equation between the logarithm of flux density and the logarithm of core-loss density. This turns out to depend upon the properties of magnetic materials. Although under certain conditions core losses may actually go down as size goes down, the broader considerations (not treated mathematically in this paper) of combined copper and core losses make such a condition untenable. At least, the equations and curves can provide the basis for a judicious estimate of the effect of miniaturization on inductor Q in any specific application. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Electrical Breakdown Across Ceramics Under High Humidity Conditions

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Aluminum Solid Electrolytic Capacitor

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 3 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (800 KB)  

    A new aluminum solid foil type capacitor, based on the use of semiconductor material (manganese dioxide) instead of the use of a liquid electrolyte, is described. This capacitor compares favorably with the high reliability liquid-impregnated aluminum types (the so-called extended life types). This new capacitor occupies an intermediate position, as regards capacitance-voltage product per unit of volume, between the above mentioned high reliability type and the solid slug tantalum type. Outstanding properties of this aluminum capacitor are its behavior at low temperature and the stability of the various electrical parameters during life tests. Because of its estimated lower cost as compared with the solid slug tantalum capacitor, this new type will be especially suited for applications where neither the utmost miniaturization nor the better electrical properties of the solid slug tantalum capacitor are needed, but where a conventional liquid impregnated type has inadequate low temperature characteristics and has too short a stable life. Pilot plant production has been started, the output of which is being used for evaluation purposes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Survey of Liquid Boiling Phenomena: Their Prediction and Analysis

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 12 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1360 KB)  

    Whether it be in the packaging of electronic components or in the design of systems for the cryogenics field, the understanding of liquid boiling phenomena and the ability to predict boiling behavior are important assets to the design engineer so involved. This paper offers an already sifted compilation of information and analyses which relates studies of all the occurrences from nucleate bailing to film boiling in a fluent story. Herein are discussed the influence of the system pressure, the cleanliness, roughness and chemical nature of the heating surface, and the wettability and degree of subcooling of the liquid. In the final partion of the paper an effort is made to tie the information presented together in what might be considered advisory remarks relative to its application. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimized Design of Transformers for Application in Silicon Controlled Rectifier Extinction and Ignition Circuits

    Publication Year: 1963 , Page(s): 36 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1632 KB)  

    In recent years the evolution of more sophisticated military avionic systems has required a corresponding reduction in component size and an increase in component life, precision, and reliability. To satisfy these more difficult design requirements, silicon solid-state devices are being used more extensively in power switching applications. Silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR's) can be used in place of relays or to drive relays with the proper ignition and extinction control circuits. The most general purpose external control circuits are the use of a transformer winding in series or in parallel with the SCR for quenching and a transformer winding connected between the trigger and the cathode for ignition. The use of separate transformers for exact timing and control of SCR's in dc circuits is an optimum control method since transformers have no moving parts and are usually more reliable than relays or pure transistor networks. In ac circuits, where waveform zeros are not used for switching, transformers can provide a convenient, precise method of SCR control. The purpose of this paper is to provide an optimum procedure for the designing of single primary and secondary winding ignition and extinction transformers (as shown in Fig. 1) for controlling SCR's. In addition, this paper provides a transformer core and winding specification synthesis that minimizes the over-all transformer size. A transformer secondary can provide a voltage zero in series with the SCR which allows the center p-n region to naturally recombine its excess charge carriers. It can also reset an SCR by providing both an external short across the SCR and the required SCR reverse current to deplete the excess charge carriers in the region of the center junction. This paper presents six circuits and their design parameters for setting and resetting SCR's. There are two ignition circuits and four quench circuits. For each of the six transformer circuits a relizability theorem, using the external circuit parameters, is provided so that a nonrealizable synthesis can be avoided. Ignition and extinction of SCR's require either a current impulse or a voltage impulse. Consequently the transformer design procedure is based upon certain essential elements of the full equivalent circuit, which i- s shown in Fig. 2. These transformers are intermittent in operation and do not require phase and amplitude linearity; hence the significant circuit design parameters are the turns ratio N, coil resistances Rssand Rsp, and primary shunt inductance Lp. The procedure developed in this paper is based upon these fundamental transformer parameters with derived criteria for maximum values of leakage inductance Lsand equialent shunt capacitance Cw(both referred to the primary side). A simple synthesis procedure is also presented in this paper for the determination of actual transformer core and winding dimensions based upon the equivalent circuit parameters of Fig. 2 and the known external circuit environment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1965. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope