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Engineering Science and Education Journal

Issue 5 • Date Oct 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
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  • The use of managed learning environments and automated assessment for supporting large-group teaching

    Page(s): 193 - 198
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    There are many pedagogical and resource issues associated with teaching very large groups. These relate to the delivery of course materials, student support and assessment. This paper describes the delivery and assessment of a course in Accounting and Finance studied by 310 students in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. 'Blackboard', a Web-based managed learning environment (MLE), was used to support lectures, providing access to a study guide, detailed notes and case studies. The Speedwell multiple-choice examination system was used for summative assessment. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering-the future: or engineering the future

    Page(s): 173 - 184
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    The engineering profession faces many challenges as we begin the new millennium. In the UK the popularity of engineering as a career is declining and employers in some fields report difficulties recruiting appropriately qualified staff. We are not, however, alone in our difficulties; other countries in the western world face similar declines, but in the Asia-Pacific region expansion is still strong. The paper analyses these relative positions and illustrates how the supply and demand patterns have changed over time. Following a brief historical review of the emergence of engineering as a profession, it goes on to consider the vital formation stage of an engineering career and shows how the education and training environment has been changed. The paper then looks forward to the emergence of Internet-based delivery of both continuing professional development and elements of undergraduate education and goes on to show how the approved changes to the IEE membership structure should help address the future needs of the profession. The address concludes with an analysis of the policy decisions required at both government and professional level and some personal predictions as to the future shape of the professional institutions. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing creativity in engineering students

    Page(s): 185 - 192
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    There is an increasing perception of the need for graduates of engineering to be creative thinkers and innovators. It is however, not clear how creativity can be nurtured or fostered within students or how it can be assessed. What is creativity? What blocks it and what facilitates it? What potential do students have for creative thinking and how can this be enhanced? What is the creative process and how can our understanding of this help with curriculum design? If the creative process can be described as 'preparation, generation, incubation and verification', what idea generation strategies are appropriate for engineering? In this paper a model to consider the 'creative potential' is presented in order to promote discussion about appropriate education developments that may be incorporated within or be additional to an engineering programme. Examples of two such developments are given which place the engineering student in a multidisciplinary context to enhance the potential for creative thinking. View full abstract»

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  • Aiming for the Moon: the engineering challenge of Apollo

    Page(s): 164 - 172
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    In retrospect, the Apollo lunar programme is recognised as a political imperative, designed to illustrate American superiority in the face of Soviet competition. It was, nevertheless, also a triumph of technology over seemingly insurmountable challenges. The developments in the many aspects of engineering required to meet those challenges stand, even today, as a testament to mankind's inventiveness and perseverance. The Apollo 17 mission ended this historic first phase of manned planetary exploration in December 1972, but the legacy of the Apollo programme remains-in science, technology and culture-even 30 years on. This paper describes the guidance, navigation and control, the power subsystem, learning from mistakes, and the problems encountered by Apollo 13. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The Engineering Science and Education Journal was published by the IET between 1992 and 2002.

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