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Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan 1991

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Optimal morphological pattern restoration from noisy binary images

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 14 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1200 KB)  

    A theoretical analysis of morphological filters for the optimal restoration of noisy binary images is presented. The problem is formulated in a general form, and an optimal solution is obtained by using fundamental tools from mathematical morphology and decision theory. Consideration is given to the set-difference distance function as a measure of comparison between images. This function is used to introduce the mean-difference function as a quantitative measure of the degree of geometrical and topological distortion introduced by morphological filtering. It is proved that the class of alternating sequential filters is a set of parametric, smoothing morphological filters that best preserve the crucial structure of input images in the least-mean-difference sense View full abstract»

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  • Residual analysis for feature detection

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 30 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (992 KB)  

    It is shown that in a very simple form residual analysis achieves results that are at least as good as if not better than those obtained by other techniques. There are many ways for extensions of the method. For example, moving average filters of regularization can be used to obtain the residual images. Also, the strength of the correlation, measured by Drr(O), can be used to eliminate noise, weak edges, etc. A more ambitious extension is by considering smoothing filters that leave invariant the function representing the reflectance from smooth surfaces View full abstract»

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  • On three-dimensional surface reconstruction methods

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 1 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (60)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1428 KB)  

    A survey is presented of some of the surface reconstruction methods that can be found in the literature; the focus is on a small, recent, and important subset of the published reconstruction techniques. The techniques are classified based on the surface representation used, implicit versus explicit functions. A study is made of the important aspects of the surface reconstruction techniques. One aspect is the viewpoint invariance of the methods. This is an important property if object recognition is the ultimate objective. The robustness of the various methods is examined. It is determined whether the parameter estimates are biased, and the sensitivity to obscuration is addressed. The latter two aspects are particularly important for fitting functions in the implicit form. A detailed description is given of a parametric reconstruction method for three-dimensional object surfaces that involves numeric grid generation techniques and variational principle formulations. This technique is invariant to rigid motion in dimensional space View full abstract»

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  • The perspective view of three points

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 66 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    The perspective view of three noncollinear points whose image-to-object correspondence is known is studied. Such measurements are known to be ambiguous, resulting in as many as four possible solutions to the perspective three-point problem. Although there can be four solutions, it is quite often the case that there are triangle configurations that cause one, two, three, or four solutions. The results also provide a justification for the common wisdom that there are usually two solutions View full abstract»

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  • Trinocular stereo vision for robotics

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 73 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (29)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1240 KB)  

    An approach to building a three-dimensional description of the environment of a robot using three cameras is presented. The main advantages of trinocular versus binocular stereo are simplicity, reliability, and accuracy. It is believed that these advantages make trinocular stereo vision of practical use for many robotics applications. The technique has been successfully applied to several indoor and industrial scenes. Experimental results are presented and discussed View full abstract»

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  • Robust contour decomposition using a constant curvature criterion

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 41 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (41)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1164 KB)  

    The problem of decomposing an extended boundary or contour into simple primitives is addressed with particular emphasis on Laplacian-of-Gaussian zero-crossing contours. A technique is introduced for partitioning such contours into constant curvature segments. A nonlinear `blip' filter matched to the impairment signature of the curvature computation process, an overlapped voting scheme, and a sequential contiguous segment extraction mechanism are used. This technique is insensitive to reasonable changes in algorithm parameters and robust to noise and minor viewpoint-induced distortions in the contour shape, such as those encountered between stereo image pairs. The results vary smoothly with the data, and local perturbations induce only local changes in the result. Robustness and insensitivity are experimentally verified View full abstract»

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  • Estimation three-dimensional motion of rigid objects from noisy observations

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 61 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB)  

    An estimate is made of the motion of a rigid body from two noisy 2-D perspective projections using the least-squares method and the algebra of R.Y. Tsai and T.S. Huang (1984). The accuracy of the estimated motion parameters is influenced by the position of the features of the object used in the calculation. Four test variables are derived that indicate how the accuracy is affected, and they are used for discarding inaccurate estimates. Monte Carlo tests demonstrate the obtained accuracy View full abstract»

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  • Shape representation by multiscale contour approximation

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 85 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (844 KB)  

    An approach is presented for deriving qualitative descriptions of contours containing structures at different (unknown) scales. The descriptions are in terms of straight arcs, curved arcs with sign of curvature, corners, and points delimiting the arcs: inflexion points and transitions from straight to curved. Furthermore, the tangents at these points are derived. The approach is based on the construction of a hierarchic family of polygons, having the scale-space property of causality; structure can only disappear as scale goes from fine to coarse. Using the principle that structures that are stable over scale represent significant properties, the features of the descriptive representations are then derived View full abstract»

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  • Characterizing three-dimensional surface structures from visual images

    Publication Year: 1991 , Page(s): 52 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1116 KB)  

    A new technique for computing intrinsic surface properties is presented. Intrinsic surface properties are those properties of a surface that are not affected by the choice of the coordinate system, the position of the viewer relative to the surface, and the particular parametric representation used to describe the imaged surface. Since intrinsic properties are characteristics of a surface, they are ideal for the purposes of representation and recognition. The intrinsic properties of interest are the principal curvatures, the Gaussian curvatures, and the lines of curvature. It is proposed that a structured-light sensing configuration where a grid pattern is projected to encode the imaged surfaces for analysis be adopted. At each stripe junction, the curvatures of the projected stripes on the imaged surface are computed and related to those of the normal sections that share the same tangential directional as the projected curves. The principal curvatures and their directions at the stripe junction under consideration are then recovered using Euler's theorem. Results obtained using both synthetic and real images are presented View full abstract»

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The IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TPAMI) is published monthly. Its editorial board strives to present most important research results in areas within TPAMI's scope.

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Editor-in-Chief
David A. Forsyth
University of Illinois