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Quantum Electronics, IEEE Journal of

Issue 1 • Date January 1971

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Page(s): 0
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    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • [Back cover]

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  • Laser action of dyes in gelatin

    Page(s): 45 - 46
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    High-gain directional stimulated emission has been observed for a number of dyes in gelatin with pumping by a nitrogen laser or a liquid dye laser. For some dyes the gel is made with water and gelatin; for others a detergent must be added or glycerin used instead of water. View full abstract»

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  • Mode competition and self-locking in a multipass CO2laser

    Page(s): 22 - 24
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    Observation of self-locking is reported in a CO2multipass laser. Phase-locked pulsing occurred at or in multiples of the cavity round-trip transit time. The observed pulse half-widths ranged from 60 to 70 ns. View full abstract»

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  • Saturation and discharge studies in the He-Cd laser

    Page(s): 11 - 17
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    The results of experimental studies of the various saturation effects and of discharge processes that occur in He-Cd lasers are presented and interpreted. It was found that the laser output can be adequately described by means of the rate equations. Based on these rate equations and the experimental results, the output and configuration of the He-Cd laser may be optimized. An estimate of the transfer cross section between the helium metastable and the cadmium atom is also presented. View full abstract»

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  • On the excitation mechanism of the He-Zn laser

    Page(s): 40 - 41
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    By means of fluorescence, decay measurements in a He-Zn pulsed afterglow, the Zn II laser transitions at 5894 and 7479 Å have been assigned to Penning collisions with He(23S1) metastable atoms. The Zn II 6102-Å transition is ascribed to charge transfer collisions with He+. Penning and charge transfer cross sections are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Interferometric measurement of refractive index and temperature profiles in a pulsed CO2laser amplifier

    Page(s): 17 - 22
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    The spatial and temporal refractive-index changes produced by a pulsed discharge in a CO2-N2mixture, under conditions which produce gains in excess of 10 dB/m, have been measured experimentally using an interferometric technique. The spatial refractive-index variation can lead to a significant increase in the divergence of a beam propagating through a laser amplifier a few meters in length. From the measured refractive-index changes, the gas temperature profile after the cessation of the current pulse has been calculated. The peak temperature obtained is between 600 and 700 K. The addition of helium to the CO2-N2mixture did not significantly affect the peak temperature but did result in a decrease in the thermal relaxation time. View full abstract»

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  • Demultiplexers for high-speed optical PCM

    Page(s): 24 - 29
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    Optical demultiplexers have been developed for a time-division-multiplexed high-capacity optical pulse code modulation (PCM) terminal. The demultiplexing is accomplished by assigning two orthogonal linearly polarized states of light to adjacent pulses using an electrooptic modulator and then spatially separating them with a polarization selective prism. The process is repeated until all the channels are separated. In order to separate pulses1.7 times 10^{-10}s apart, corresponding to pulse chains of a 24-channel 250 megabits per second per channel time-division-multiplexed PCM system, a voltage sufficient to vary the relative phase retardation bypm2pi/sqrt{3}rad at 1 GHz is necessary. The ability of the demultiplexer to separate the pulses depends on the residual strain in the crystal as well as on the temperature gradients introduced by the high-frequency voltage applied to the small volume of modulator crystal. The importance of these effects in determining the crosstalk ratio between adjacent channels is analyzed. A comparison of several ferroelectric crystals, which show a linear, transverse electrooptic effect, is made for potential demultiplexer applications. It is concluded that LiTaO3and Ba2NaNb5O15are about equivalent as crystals for demultiplexers, provided that crystals of the same size and optical quality are available. Measurements to evaluate the crosstalk ratio of demultiplexers using LiTaO3are described. A modulator with 1.5 W of applied power was sufficient to provide a crosstalk ratio of 19 atlambda = 0.63 muwhereas two modulators, each with 1 W of applied power, were needed atlambda = 1.06 muto obtain the same crosstalk ratio. Together with the high-speed optical gates and schemes of multiplexing demonstrated in the past, the present measurements demonstrate the capability of existing electrooptic modulators to function in a high-bit-rate (6000 megabits/s) time-division-multiplexed optical PCM communication system. View full abstract»

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  • Ultrahigh-speed photography of picosecond light pulses

    Page(s): 37 - 39
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    A new technique for the display of picosecond light pulses is presented. Ultrashort (6 ps) green light pulses passing through a light-scattering medium are photographed from the side by a camera positioned behind a shutter of 10-ps framing time. The shutter is an ultrafast Kerr cell driven by infrared pulses 8 ps in duration. Color photographs show a bright spot on a dark background, revealing the unambiguous presence of well-isolated picosecond light pulses. The shape of the spot is the result of a convolution involving the three-dimensional shape of the green pulse and the time transmission function of the shutter, this function being dictated by the shape of the infrared pulse. The experiment indicates that a new technique for visualizing light pulses consists in simply observing their flight through a scattering medium from behind an ultrafast shutter having a framing time equal to the time resolution desired. The new technique has many advantages over the two-photon fluorescence display technique, such as higher sensitivity, wider spectral range, and easier interpretation. The ultrafast camera also can be used for the photographic measurement of ultrashort relaxation times in dielectrics and in fluorescent dyes. View full abstract»

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  • Signature variations with mirror separation for small sealed CO2lasers

    Page(s): 29 - 35
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    A detailed experimental study of laser signature as a function of laser mirror distance variations is reported. This was done for small sealed low-power CO2lasers (≈ 1 watt) of the type useful in laser communication. It is shown that most laser-output profiles change drastically from half-wavelength to half-wavelength except the strong P(20) line, which seems to remain relatively constant. Frequency width is given for many of the laser output profiles appearing in the various signatures observed. Line competition is also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Continuous visible and near-infrared laser action in Hg II

    Page(s): 39 - 40
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    CW laser oscillation from singly ionized mercury at 6150 and 7945 Å has been observed in a transverse-discharge slotted hollow-cathode laser. Population inversion is attributed to charge transfer and Penning-type ionization reactions. View full abstract»

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  • Theory of Fabry-Perot resonators with dielectric medium

    Page(s): 1 - 11
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    A Fabry-Perot resonator filled with a dielectric slab is investigated using the Vainshtein method. Simple and explicit formulas are obtained for the diffraction loss, phase shift, and field distributions for both strip and circular mirrors. It is found that the presence of the dielectric reduces the diffraction loss, and causes mode confinement to certain degrees. View full abstract»

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  • Signal structure of continuously self-pulsing GaAs lasers

    Page(s): 43 - 45
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    CW-excited GaAs lasers can emit self-induced pulses. To study these pulses we have used an intensity correlator involving phase-matched second-harmonic generation in LiIO3. Besides measuring the pulsewidth and the repetition rate we investigated the amplitude fluctuations within a pulse and the correlation between fluctuations of consecutive pulses. View full abstract»

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  • On the spiking phenomenon in organic dye lasers

    Page(s): 36 - 37
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    The spiking condition of dye lasers is analyzed by means of a small-signal approximation of the rate equations. Dye lasers are generally operated close to the border region between spiking and nonspiking. An initial spike is observed in the output beam of a flash-lamp-excited rhodamine 6G laser with a shortened cavity. View full abstract»

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  • Optical second-harmonic generation in isocyclic and heterocyclic organic compounds

    Page(s): 42 - 43
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    Second-harmonic generation experiments show that large optical nonlinearities are associated with isocyclic and heterocyclic organic groups. The nonlinearities in one compound of the pyrimidine family, 5-Nitrouracil, are estimated to be as large as in barium-sodium niobate. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics is dedicated to the publication of manuscripts reporting novel experimental or theoretical results in the broad field of the science and technology of quantum electronics..

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Aaron R. Hawkins
Brigham Young University