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Quantum Electronics, IEEE Journal of

Issue 1 • Date January 1978

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Page(s): 0
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Announcing the new IEEE quantum electronics and applications group

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Comparison of two new microwave plasma sources for HF chemical lasers

    Page(s): 8 - 11
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    The performances of two microwave sources used to produce fluorine atoms by dissociation of SF6for a CW hydrogen fluoride chemical laser are compared. The first device, large microwave plasma (LMP), is a slow-wave structure while, the other (surfatron) excites a plasma surface wave. Their performances, as far as electrical and chemical efficiencies are concerned, are quite similar when operated at the same microwave power level. However, the slow-wave structure can sustain higher microwave power, providing larger laser output power, while the surfatron has much smaller dimensions, allowing for a more compact laser system. View full abstract»

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  • 1.05-1.44 µm tunability and performance of the CW Nd3+:YAG laser

    Page(s): 56 - 62
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    The Nd3+:YAG laser pumped by a CW 5-kW krypton arc-lamp was tuned to 19 different transitions from 1.052 to 1.444 μm by means of intracavity thin solid etalons and appropriately coated resonator mirrors. Each transition was tunable over 6-12 wavenumbers and most exhibited 10-30-W CW output, attaining 37 W at 1.319 μm and 52 W at 1.112 μm. The 1.061-μm line is 90 percent as strong as at 1.064 μm, and wavelength shift with temperature variation was measured for both. TEM00output of 20 W was available by using apertures, and compensation of thermal lensing resulted in 60 W combined TEM00+ TEM01output. View full abstract»

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  • [Back cover]

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Radiation pattern of light scattering from the core region of dielectric-slab-optical waveguides

    Page(s): 30 - 37
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    The scattering from dielectric-slab-optical waveguides having refractive-index inhomogeneities in the core region has been studied by solving the Maxwell equations together with the use of a stationary phase method. The scattering phenomenon is of interest since it provides the radiation pattern in the far-field region which is characterized by the statistical scale of inhomogeneities in a waveguide. The anisotropic fluctuations of the refractive index in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the axis of light propagation have been assumed in the analysis. It is found that the strong multiple peaks in the forward direction occur in the substrate region when the correlation length of refractive-index inhomogeneities in the axial direction is much greater than the wavelength of light. View full abstract»

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  • Theoretical derivatives of the electrical characteristic of a junction laser operated in the vicinity of threshold

    Page(s): 62 - 68
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    Analytic expressions are derived to describe the ideal electrical behavior expected of a double heterostructure junction laser operating in the vicinity of its lasing threshold. The analysis is based on a laser model in which the current-voltage characteristic of the p-n junction is determined by recombination alone. The first, second, and third current derivatives of the junction voltage are computed as a function of injection current for parameters thought to be typical of contemporary stripe-geometry lasers. The resulting derivative behavior exhibits a smooth transition from nonlasing to lasing emission qualitatively similar to that observed experimentally. View full abstract»

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  • Oscillation properties of anisotropic lasers

    Page(s): 49 - 55
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    Rate equations for anisotropic lasers were investigated theoretically. The effect of anisotropy of optical properties, such as emission cross section and resonant absorption loss, on the laser performance was examined quantitively. Conditions for dual-polarization oscillations (DPO), as well as formulas which relate the output power to the pump power and various other laser parameters, were given. Experiments were carried out using Nd-stoichiometric-laser crystals. There was good agreement between theory and experimental results. DPO laser oscillating mode patterns and output waveforms were also presented. View full abstract»

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  • Small-signal gain measurements in a CW chemical laser

    Page(s): 12 - 16
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    Measurements of the small-signal gain of the laser medium produced by a combustion-driven CW chemical laser are presented. The laser characterized is a conventional supersonic flow chemical laser. A low-power CW chemical probe laser operating on a single line and single TEM00qmode was used for the measurements. Scans of the cavity in the streamwise direction were made by directing the probe beam through the cavity with a set of translating mirrors. We present a description of the probe laser, scanning mechanism, and signal processing system which gave good repeatability and excellent signal-to-noise performance. Streamwise scans of the laser cavity at two nozzle heights are presented. One of the scans was made at the nozzle center, and the other near the nozzle edge where free-jet expansion affects the gain medium. The measured gain profiles obtained at these two heights are compared and analyzed for several laser lines and several flow conditions. Finally, we analyze these data in terms of measured laser performance parameters. View full abstract»

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  • Ultraviolet ion laser performance and spectroscopy for sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, and bromine

    Page(s): 4 - 6
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    The performance and spectroscopy was investigated for ultraviolet ion laser transitions in fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and sulfur. Three new transitions were found in bromine below 280 nm and 60-W peak power was observed for the strongest new line in Br IV? at 236.2465 nm. The wavelengths for the new and previously known transitions were measured to about 0.001 nm. Performance was optimized using a 7-mm bore 150 cm arc-length tube using a fast longitudinal discharge for excitation. View full abstract»

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  • Profile dispersion effects on transmission bandwidths in graded index optical fibers

    Page(s): 37 - 41
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    Transmission bandwidths of optical fibers would be maximized if their refractive index profiles were optimally graded. However, dispersive differences between fiber material constituents make the optimal power law profile exponent α depend on wavelength. This profile dispersion effect is significant for germanium borosilicate fibers and makes their observed transmission bandwidths change by more than 300 percent within a 650-1050 nm wavelength range. Measurements are made in spectrally filtered white light from a xenon arc lamp that is sinusoidally modulated by an electrooptic crystal. Reduction of sine wave envelope intensity due to transmission in a fiber gives its baseband frequency response. The functional dependence of bandwidth on wavelength is used to diagnose whether α is larger or smaller than the optimal value which minimizes intermodal dispersion at particular wavelengths. View full abstract»

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  • Nd:YAG laser pumped infrared dye laser

    Page(s): 7 - 8
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    Efficient operation of a high peak power and high-average power infrared dye laser, continuously tunable over the range of 10810-12160 Å, has been achieved by pumping with an Nd:YAG laser. A peak power as high as 4 MW with an average power of 390 MW was obtained. View full abstract»

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  • Frequency stability and stabilization of a chemical laser

    Page(s): 17 - 22
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    We have built a low-power CW HF/DF chemical laser, designed to achieve high-frequency stability. Measurements are reported which characterize the instantaneous spectral width of the laser output to less than one part in 1011(Deltanu < 1kHz) and the variations in absolute frequency of this emission with time to four parts in 1010(Deltanu = pm20kHz) per 0.1 ms. Two experiments to actively stabilize the laser frequency are reported. In one experiment the laser was locked to a high-finesse Fabry-Perot to five parts in 109(Deltanu = pm250kHz) for many minutes. In the other experiment one laser was locked to another using heterodyne beat spectroscopy to 1.7 parts in 109(Deltanu = pm85kHz). The stabilization experiments were limited by the feedback loops used. View full abstract»

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  • Two-photon transitions in optically pumped submillimeter lasers

    Page(s): 23 - 30
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    The emission frequency of an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), optically pumped submillimeter (SMM) laser has been studied as a function of laser gas pressure for several different gases and SMM laser lines. For off resonant pumping, Fabry-Perot interfetometer scans indicate a shift in emission frequency between high- and low-pressure laser operation. In high-pressure operation, emission occurs via a Raman type, two-photon process with some additional frequency offset due to the ac Stark effect. The Raman process is favored by its higher quantum efficiency over a two-step process involving single-photon transitions at the pump and SMM wavelengths. In low-pressure operation, the SMM laser emission is found to be delayed in time with respect to the pump pulse. The Raman process thus cannot occur and the two-step process is favored. This results in a shift in the SMM laser emission frequency from the Raman line to the line center frequency of the SMM laser transition. The Raman emission gain bandwidth appears to be broadened by the CO2pump laser bandwidth. View full abstract»

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  • CO2pulsed laser radiation tellurium detectors

    Page(s): 42 - 44
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    Subnanosecond detectors and beam monitors for pulsed CO2laser radiation using the photon drag and optical rectification effects in tellurium are presented. Tellurium devices at 10.6 μ have a response of the order of 80 μV/kW . cm-2with an NEP of8 times 10^{-4}W . Hz1/2andD*of 500 cm . Hz1/2/W which is superior to commercially available photon drag detectors and monitors. It is also expected and experimentally demonstrated that the responsivities of large area monitors can be multiplied by cutting the original area into multi-element strips and electrically connecting them in series. View full abstract»

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  • Optically heterodyned coherent Raman spectroscopy

    Page(s): 45 - 49
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    A convenient variation of Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (RIKES) which overcomes many of the previous limitations of coherent Raman spectroscopy is introduced. Quantum limited signal-to-noise ratios may be approached by the use of optical heterodyne detection (OHD). Detector current, linearly proportional and phase sensitive to the third-order nonlinear susceptibility, and linearly proportional to the Raman scattering cross section, is produced. Heterodyne detection in coherent Raman spectroscopy enables the detection of weak Raman signals that would otherwise be obscured by noise resulting from background sources. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics is dedicated to the publication of manuscripts reporting novel experimental or theoretical results in the broad field of the science and technology of quantum electronics..

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Aaron R. Hawkins
Brigham Young University