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Solid-State Circuits, IEEE Journal of

Issue 4 • Date Aug. 1969

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover - August 1969]

    Page(s): f1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover - August 1969]

    Page(s): f2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editor's Notice (August 1969)

    Page(s): 181
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Foreword (August 1969)

    Page(s): 182 - 183
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A highly efficient inductorless voltage regulator

    Page(s): 192 - 195
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    This versatile and highly efficient voltage regulator, for applications where the conventional series regulator and the inductor type of switching regulator are impractical, uses solid-state switching techniques. Efficiencies greater than 90 percent have been achieved, independent of input voltage amplitudes. Good load regulation is provided, with a ripple increase as the main effect of a load-current increase. High-peak-current capability is another major advantage of the regulator. The circuit described successfully delivers power peaks of 600 watts. Output voltage restoration from the power line is accomplished as quickly as possible. Some applications of the regulator are prereugulation, class-B audio amplifiers, and solenoid driving. View full abstract»

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  • Wide-band network characterization by Fourier transformation of time-domain measurements

    Page(s): 231 - 235
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    A novel method of measuring driving-point and transfer impedance over a wide spectrum rapidly and with good accuracy uses a digital computer to transform the pulse response of a network into the frequency domain. A sampling oscilloscope provides the time transformation needed for data acquisition. The method and laboratory technique are discussed. Experimental data show agreement within 12 percent between the data from a single pulse measurement and bridge measurements over a band of 40 harmonic frequencies, i.e., 25-1000 MHz. Fundamental accuracy and bandwidth are believed to be substantially greater than these figures. View full abstract»

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  • A triple-channel micropower operational amplifier

    Page(s): 236 - 240
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    One method of increasing the amount of circuit functions using bipolar devices is to simplify the design of the monolithic chip. This paper describes such a new integrated circuit. The circuit has three independent, micropower, high- gain operational amplifiers on the monolithic chip. Open-loop voltage gain as high as 100 dB has been achieved with a power dissipation of under 300 /spl mu/W. The gain and power dissipation are externally controlled byout board components. Complete performance characteristics along with analysis are presented. View full abstract»

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  • An amplifier with bipolar transistors and extremely high input impedance

    Page(s): 243 - 244
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    A differential amplifier with unity gain, less than 10 to 50 mV offset, and a dc input resistance of 900 M/spl Omega/ was examined using complementary bipolar transistors. View full abstract»

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  • A new mode of operation-a controlled monostable tunnel-diode circuit

    Page(s): 244 - 249
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    A new mode of operation of a tunnel-diode pair circuit has been developed and theory and circuit design are presented. Operation principles are discussed for damped-oscillation mode, unbalanced mode, and balanced mode with overdamping. Since the circuit has a high degree of freedom, several applications are possible, for example, as an inverter, pulse shaper, quasi-stable memory, and time-to-pulse width converter. The test circuit arrangement together with some experimental results are reported and characteristics of the different modes are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors (August 1969)

    Page(s): 252 - 254
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IC signal-processing circuit for TV receivers

    Page(s): 202 - 210
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    An IC signal-processing circuit that can be applied in both black-and-white and color receivers is described. The integrated circuit combines the following functions: video preamplifier; keyed AGC detector, operating on top sync level; AGC amplifier for IF and tuner control; noise canceling circuits for AGC and sync circuits; sync separator; automatic horizontal sync; and vertical sync pulse separator. Due to the noise-canceling circuit a stable synchronization is obtained when impulse noise is received. Since the values of the capacitors in the AGC circuit can be rather low without difficulties with instabilities, the performance during fast input signal fluctuations (airplane flutter) is very good. View full abstract»

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  • Experimental sync separator and associated circuitry in integrated form

    Page(s): 210 - 216
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    An experimental integrated circuit that performs the functions of sync separation, noise inversion, and AGC amplification was designed and fabricated. The IC uses p-channel enhancement-type MOS units as active transistors, diodes, and resistors. The threshold voltages permit the design of voltage-regulator circuits for the reference levels in the various signal-processing stages. The results of a test of the IC in combination with a commercial TV receiver are described. View full abstract»

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  • Synthesis of operational amplifiers

    Page(s): 241 - 243
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    Operational amplifiers are specified from system considerations. A set of equations is evaluated giving the active part of the amplifier as a function of the specifications. The solution is claimed to be an optimal one with respect to circuit complexity. This statement is verified by an example. View full abstract»

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  • Integrated MOS analog delay line

    Page(s): 196 - 201
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    A 16-stage, fixed or variable analog delay line that makes use of integrated p-channel MOS field-effect transistors is described. The delay line relies on `sample' and `hold' techniques and makes use of the inherent characteristics of p-channel MOS transistors. The delay line provides unit gain with a dynamic range of 1 volt. The bandwidth of the delay line is 0.8 MHz under nonsampling conditions. The lowest sampling rate was found to be 50 Hz. A built-in capacitive compensation technique using signals opposite in phase reduces feedthrough of the sampling signal and final filtering requirements. Investigation of the problems of obtaining unity gain and dynamic range led to the development of a computer-aided analysis that provides a family of dc transfer characteristics of cascaded p- channel MOS `half-stages' when a variation of either a material or electrical parameter is made. View full abstract»

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  • Super-gain transistors for IC's

    Page(s): 249 - 251
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    Transistors with current gains of 2000 to 10000 at collector currents less than 1 μA can now be made in monolithic circuits. This is more than ten times the gain of present-day discrete transistors. The significance of this breakthrough is greatest for IC operational amplifiers as lower input bias currents are constantly being sought. Circuit techniques are available, namely bootstrapping and cascade connections, that take advantage of the high-current gain of one transistor type and the high-breakdown voltage of the second, producing the equivalent of a high gain, high-voltage device. This may double the number of transistors needed to perform a given function, but it is an economical approach for monolithic IC's as active devices have a relatively low cost. View full abstract»

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  • Design techniques for monolithic operational amplifiers

    Page(s): 184 - 191
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    The characteristics of recently developed integrated-circuit components are reviewed and some new devices are described. Their impact on the design of monolithic operational amplifiers is also discussed. Emphasis is placed on realizing particularly good dc characteristics-especially low input current. However, techniques for obtaining higher operating speeds are also covered. View full abstract»

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  • Periodic-switching filter networks-a means of amplifying and varying transfer functions

    Page(s): 225 - 230
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    A technique of periodically switching filter networks makes continuously variable filter parameters possible; at the same time capacitor or time-constant multiplication is obtained. With this method the time constants are multiplied by the switching period to switch aperture-time ration. Because the aperture time is usually small compared to the switching period, the active elements can be shared. A typical first-order system is analyzed for its step and sine response by the difference equation method. Phase and gain error expressions are established as a function of the various parameters. Limiting cases are then investigated to give a measure of a pulse- switched system performance. Finally an application of a multiplexed system is presented where three independent transfer functions are realized using one operational amplifier. View full abstract»

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  • Frequency-selective integrated circuits using phase-lock techniques

    Page(s): 216 - 225
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    A system-oriented approach to the design of inductorless tuned integrated circuits is described. This design method uses the phase-locked loop (PLL) techniques to obtain the desired tuning and interference-rejection characteristics. The PLL approach does not require tight control of component tolerances, and offers a higher selectivity and frequency capability than the corresponding active-RC synthesis methods. In this paper, basic design parameters for phase-locked integrated circuits are given, and two separate design examples are described. First is a high- frequency (1 to 25 MHz) FM amplifier/detector, which forms a monolithic replacement for the IF strip and the detector sections of a conventional FM receiver or TV sound system. The second is an integrated FM multiplex receiver for multi-channel telemetry applications, which has the selectivity of a 6-pole bandpass filter and can be tuned by means of an external resistor or capacitor from a fraction of a cycle to over 300 kHz. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits publishes papers each month in the broad area of solid-state circuits with particular emphasis on transistor-level design of integrated circuits.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Flynn
University of Michigan