By Topic

Computer

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 2002

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • The power of the most likely

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 12 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (271 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Do Web standards and patents mix?

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 19 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB)  

    Since the Internet's early days, engineers and researchers have built the "network of networks" largely with open standards, which many argue has let the technology become as popular as it is today. However, that popularity may also discourage companies that develop promising new Internet technologies from making them available for use in open standards in the future. The Web offers many potential opportunities for innovative technology companies to make money in areas such as telecommunications, consumer electronics, streaming media, and e-commerce. Therefore, a growing number of companies are receiving and enforcing patents for their potentially lucrative technologies. Meanwhile, as standards organizations work on various Web technologies, they frequently can't avoid turning to patented approaches. Now, a debate has erupted between those who say the Internet should be built of freely available, standardized technology components and those who argue that useful technology development should be fairly compensated via royalties or licensing fees. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Project promises accessible technology for the disabled

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Two efforts aim to upgrade mobile memory

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (185 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Prime breakthrough may improve encryption

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • System Architecture with XML [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrated Broadband Networks: TCP/IP, ATM, SDH/SONET, and WDM/Optics [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Building Operational Excellence [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Developing Secure Distributed Systems with CORBA [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The economics of DSL regulation

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 29 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (303 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite a growing demand for highspeed Internet and network access in the US broadband market, many digital-subscriber-line companies are downsizing, scaling back service, or closing their doors altogether. More importantly, upstart independent DSL providers have gone to war with the Baby Bells, alleging that they have purposely accelerated the shakeout of start-up companies by exploiting all DSL providers' dependence on the last-mile network infrastructure that the Baby Bells provide. Separating the economic interests of incumbent exchange carriers and their affiliates will ultimately serve consumers best. An open market for DSL access run exclusively by the Baby Bells would avoid existing distortions and let regulation focus on encouraging the regional Bell operating companies to provide access to underrepresented areas where investment would otherwise be unjustified. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rethinking the digital divide

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 108, 106 - 107
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (347 KB)  

    In our search for transgressive models of distance education, we found inspiration in the "Web-back" performance pieces of Guillermo Gomez-Penia (1997), the production of virtual favelas in Brazil, and rural education models from the Philippines and Malaysia. As we thought in particular about our desire to reach Native American reservations and Mexican-American border towns in the US Southwest, we asked how these various Third World projects profile and recruit their students and what models of virtual education and empowerment they create. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web interaction using very small Internet devices

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 37 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (21)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1333 KB)  

    Internet-enabled cell phones typically accommodate only three to 12 text lines, and their design emphasizes portability. Web interaction has, so far, been a secondary concern. For the most part, automated techniques to address the feature gap between the desktop and these phonetops rely on the notion of transducing-translating HTML and images into formats compatible with small devices, which typically cannot handle HTML content. The authors have developed a Web browsing model that supports navigation and action in separate interfaces, To demonstrate the model, they created m-Links, a middleware proxy system that retrieves Web documents using HTTP, lets users navigate and apply services to Web content, and delivers a suitable user interface to a variety of small Web-capable wireless devices. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The computer graphics wars heat up

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 97 - 99
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (591 KB)  

    The author describes the present status of computer graphics hardware. While console games flourished, PC game sales have plummeted. The plans of Nvidia and ATI, the 3D graphics world's two dominant players are described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Toward the mobile Internet

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 100 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    The promise of ubiquitous computing is a future in which highly specialized, embedded computing devices operate seamlessly within the everyday environment and are transparent to users. Realizing this vision will require next-generation networks to support mobile multimedia devices with capabilities well beyond those of today's handsets. These networks will exploit wideband radio access technologies and IP-based protocols to provide IP transparency-all network elements support IP; mobility management for a globally networked environment; unique addressing for every user; personalization of information; positioning to enable location-dependent services; and end-to-end security. Such functionality requires more than providing wireless Internet access and e-mail. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The trusted PC: skin-deep security

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 103 - 105
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (247 KB)  

    Current efforts to secure the PCs traditionally open architecture will give consumers two unattractive choices: They will either have to pay a huge premium for an unwieldy system that employs impenetrable membranes, encrypted buses, and tamper-resistant memory, or they will have to settle for an inferior solution that fails to thwart dishonest users and limits the ability to backup data and interoperate with third-party software. Investing in proven architectural improvements such as guarded pointers and data tags is a more cost-effective and long-overdue alternative. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Let's hear it for audio mining

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 23 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    he Web, databases, and other digitized information storehouses contain a growing volume of audio content. Sources include newscasts, sporting events, telephone conversations, recordings of meetings, Webcasts, documentary archives such as the Visual History Foundation's interviews with Holocaust survivors (http://www.vhf. org), and media files in libraries. Users want to make the most of this material by searching and indexing the digitized audio content. In the past, companies had to create and manually analyze written transcripts of audio content because using computers to recognize, interpret, and analyze digitized speech was difficult. However, the development of faster microprocessors, larger storage capacities, and better speech-recognition algorithms has made audio mining easier. Now, the technology is on the verge of becoming a powerful tool that could help many organizations. For example, companies could use audio mining to analyze customer-service and helpdesk conversations or even voice mail. Law enforcement and intelligence organizations could use the technology to analyze intercepted phone conversations. Public relations firms could use it to analyze news broadcasts to find coverage of clients. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dynamic scan: driving down the cost of test

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 63 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Two factors primarily drive the soaring cost of semiconductor test: the number of test patterns applied to each chip and the time it takes to run each pattern. Typical semiconductor testing for each chip involves a set of 1,000 to 5,000 test patterns. These tests are applied through scan chains that operate at about 25 MHz. Depending on the size of the scan chains on the chip, a set of test patterns can take a few seconds to execute per chip. It's easy to see that even a small decrease in either the number of patterns or the time to execute them can quickly add up to big savings across millions of fabricated chips. This potential savings forms the basis for dynamic scan, a new approach to the well-established scan test methodology. The authors initial studies indicate that dynamic scan could easily reduce the time spent applying test patterns by 40 percent. A more theoretical analysis shows a potential savings of as much as 80 percent. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Denial of service in sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 54 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (332)  |  Patents (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Sensor networks hold the promise of facilitating large-scale, real-time data processing in complex environments, helping to protect and monitor military, environmental, safety-critical, or domestic infrastructures and resources, Denial-of-service attacks against such networks, however, may permit real world damage to public health and safety. Without proper security mechanisms, networks will be confined to limited, controlled environments, negating much of the promise they hold. The limited ability of individual sensor nodes to thwart failure or attack makes ensuring network availability more difficult. To identify denial-of-service vulnerabilities, the authors analyzed two effective sensor network protocols that did not initially consider security. These examples demonstrate that consideration of security at design time is the best way to ensure successful network deployment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rover: scalable location-aware computing

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 46 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1796 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    All the components necessary for realizing location-aware computing are available in the marketplace today. What has hindered the widespread deployment of location-based systems is the lack of an integration architecture that scales with user populations. The authors have completed the initial implementation of Rover, a system designed to achieve this sort of integration and to automatically tailor information and services to a mobile user's location. Their studies have validated Rover's underlying software architecture, which achieves system scalability through high-resolution, application-specific resource scheduling at the servers and network. The authors believe that this technology will greatly enhance the user experience in many places, including museums, amusement and theme parks, shopping malls, game fields, offices, and business centers. They designed the system specifically to scale to large user populations and expect its benefits to increase with them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
University of Florida
sumi.helal@gmail.com