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IEEE Spectrum

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • They might be giants

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):43 - 48
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  • EE unemployment on the rise in United States

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):21 - 22
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  • What a difference 18 months make

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):24 - 26
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  • New york state wins top semiconductor R and D lab

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):26 - 30
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  • Radiance [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s): 75
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The future of engineering [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s): 86
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Living in the Limelight

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):76 - 79
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    Napster may be dead, but Mark Gorton and his company are making sure the file-sharing revolution it sparked lives on through LimeWire. LimeWire is transforming the ripple of grass-roots computer networking that began with Napster a few years ago into a cultural and, inevitably, an economic tidal wave. This article briefly discusses the career of Mark Gorton and his involvement with setting up Naps... View full abstract»

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  • Feds Online [FBI IT system upgrade]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):36 - 37
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    The terrorist attacks exposed troubling shortfalls at US intelligence agencies. Many of the most fundamental problems technology-related such as the inability of the National Security Agency (NSA) to process promptly the immense flood of communications it intercepts every day and the woefully antiquated computer systems of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The inadequacy of the FBI's comp... View full abstract»

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  • Neither snow, nor rain, nor anthrax [bioterrorism counteraction]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):38 - 39
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    To counter bioterrorism, the US Postal Service has tried electron beam irradiation to sterilise mail, then it tried detection of germs and toxins using technology developed for the battlefield. Soon, the US Postal Service may use smart mail using upgraded mail scanning equipment to read 2D bar codes. View full abstract»

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  • Second site [broadcast towers]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):40 - 41
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    Multiple broadcast towers, once thought a waste of money, are now the order of the day. Following the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center on 9/11, All broadcasts ceased minutes after impact, and as the city tried to discover what was going on, just one television station reappeared to fill the void. WCBS-TV was the only station that had transmitters at both the World Trade Center and the E... View full abstract»

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  • Try this at home [homeland security]

    Publication Year: 2002
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    It's not just the government and big corporations that are turning to technology for help following 9/11. Fearful of an unexpected terrorist attack, many individuals are taking the phrase "homeland security" literally. They're buying the kind of products that before last year were generally found only in the cabinets of survivalists and militiamen. But will these products be of any use in a real e... View full abstract»

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  • Let there be light [gallium nitride LED]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):70 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (5)
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    The incandescent light bulb rolled back the night around the start of the 20th century. The gallium nitride LED will light the way in the 21st. The development of the gallium nitride (GaN) LED, made it possible to get white light from a semiconductor. GaN LEDs are already quietly transforming specialized illumination, including architectural and stage lighting, indoor and outdoor accent lighting, ... View full abstract»

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  • Talk to the machine

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):60 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (6)
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    With better chips and faster algorithms, device makers are putting voice interfaces in PDAs, cellphones, and cars. Philips has streamlined its standard speech recognition engine to run on the Compaq 3600 PDA. This Mandarin language recognizer prototype can distinguish 40 000 words. The basics of today's speech recognizers were first worked out in the early 1970s by researchers at IBM Corp. and Car... View full abstract»

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  • Helping computers help themselves

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):49 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    At IBM and elsewhere, researchers are developing the components and feedback loops necessary for computer systems to run themselves. The hope is that the constant and costly intervention of database and network administrators trying to figure out what must be done will soon be a thing of the past. Among the first of these projects are some that enable computer systems to optimize computing resourc... View full abstract»

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  • Taking on terrorism

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):35 - 36
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    The 11th day of September 2001 began with a tragedy beyond comprehension. It ended in a cacophony of outrage, blame, and urgent questions. How could so few terrorists create death and destruction on so massive a scale? How could US intelligence services have been caught so off guard? Can technology help prevent such attacks in the future, or at least respond to them more effectively if they do occ... View full abstract»

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  • Slow takeoff [airport security]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):37 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Before 9/11, air travel in the United States was plagued by delays. It still is. But now the stepped-up security in the aftermath of the hijackings has added congestion in terminals to the delays on the tarmac. Since the newly created Transportation Security Administration (TSA) took over US aviation security, US airports have had to be evacuated on more than 100 occasions and hundreds of flights ... View full abstract»

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  • Who goes there? [personal identity systems]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):39 - 40
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    Just a few years ago, getting to work involved a nod to someone in the building lobby or a wave to an office receptionist. Today, those friendly greetings have been replaced in many offices by smart cards. Soon the use of smart cards at these sites is expected to make way for biometric identifiers: handprints, fingerprints, eye scans, or face-recognition signatures. On the way to work, too, one's ... View full abstract»

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  • Over and over and out [emergency radio systems]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):41 - 42
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    In the future, emergency systems will have to account for the orderly use of multiple communications channels. This is most easily done using digital radios. Although much has been said about such radios in connection with the communications problems on 9/11, the fact is that the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) had no such radios on the scene that day. Redundancy, clearly, was not o... View full abstract»

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  • Why the Microsoft settlement won't work

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):13 - 14
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    The Microsoft antitrust trial, probably the most important technology-related legal case of our time, appears to be limping at last toward a conclusion. Unfortunately, there is an excellent chance that the software colossus will win, despite losing, without much to restrain it from going back to the heavy-handed, anticompetitive tactics that prompted the antitrust action in the first place. View full abstract»

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  • Weaving a Web of ideas

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):65 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    Engines that search for meaning rather than words will make the Web more manageable. Committees of researchers from around the globe want to make the Web more homogeneous, more data-like, more amenable to computer understanding-and then agents won't have to be so bright. In other words, if Web pages could contain their own semantics-if we had a Semantic Web-software agents wouldn't need to know th... View full abstract»

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  • Just one word - plastics [organic semiconductors]

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):55 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
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    Organic semiconductors could put cheap circuits everywhere and make flexible displays a reality. The author considers these prospects, discussing their implementation and the fabrication technology involved. View full abstract»

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  • What ails broadband?

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):15 - 16
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    Consumers are offered technology for the sake of technology instead of real services. Do people really want broadband Internet access in their homes? It has been five years since household broadband Internet connections first became available. Yet only 4 percent of US homes with Internet-capable PCs have a broadband connection. In Europe, the figure is a paltry 4 percent. Why would not everyone wa... View full abstract»

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  • Wi-Fi hotspot networks sprout like mushrooms

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):18 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    What began as a plaything among technology buffs in the United States has quietly evolved into the fastest-growing wireless data application in the world. All over, networks based on the IEEE's 802.11b wireless local-area networking standard, known also by the commercial trademark Wi-Fi, have been springing up-and not only in businesses and other self-contained organizations but in public places l... View full abstract»

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  • China may draw a sharply lower line on mobile phone radiation

    Publication Year: 2002
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    The People's Republic may impose the world's toughest mode phone radiation standard. The tighter limits could require erecting additional phone towers and reengineering entire lines of handsets. So, with the help of US and European Union authorities, manufacturers are trying to persuade China to harmonize its standards with these of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection... View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine