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Micro, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Effective Java: Programming Language Guide [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 10 - 11
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • C# Essentials [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 11
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Essential Java Style: Patterns for Implementation [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 11
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Critical embedded automotive networks

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 14 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (563 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • The FTT-CAN protocol for flexibility in safety-critical systems

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 46 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new communication protocol for distributed embedded systems attempts to find a compromise between the often-opposing goals of system flexibility and safety View full abstract»

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  • CAN for critical embedded automotive networks

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 28 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (21)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (313 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The controller area network protocol offers flexibility in safety-critical automotive system design. the benefits of using already established specifications will aid automotive system designers in X-by-wire development View full abstract»

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  • Design and analysis of a robust real-time engine control network

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 20 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (253 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Increasing numbers of automotive control systems are being designed as distributed systems, with critical functions linked by electronic communications. This includes X-by-wire systems, which seek to replace mechanical or hydraulic linkages with electrical or communications links. These systems raise a number of new challenges: Safety is a function of the whole system rather than any one system feature. Thus, safety analysis and understanding must occur at the (complex) system level. A robust design process is essential to ensure that complex system issues and critical analysis occur at the right development stage and cover all appropriate parts of the system. This article provides a case study of a development project to show how these and other issues can be addressed. We describe the development of a communications network for a safety-related engine application that consists of a central electronic control unit (ECU) and a number of distributed actuators that are controlled via the network. We apply several techniques, such as hazard and scheduling analysis, to resolve safety and reliability issues View full abstract»

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  • The crash in competitive telephony

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 8 - 9, 88
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    In the latter half of the past decade, the electronics business became a part of the telephone business. Quite unexpectedly, many parts of the electronics industry - particularly data switch makers - found their economic welfare tied to four decades of regulatory experimentation. In this experimentation, regulators wanted to develop competitors in various parts of the telephony industry. One catalyst for the change was the US Telecommunications Act of 1996 - the first major alteration to US federal communications law in more than 60 years. At the same time, the Internet exploded into commercial use, fueling the demand for bandwidth affiliated with data transmission. The general public does not widely understand these changes. This is understandable, because the events themselves were genuinely complicated. Nonetheless, if you have an eerie sense that these changes did not go well, you are right. Many of these new competitors have gone bankrupt. Some analysts now view US transmission capacity as needlessly overbuilt. Others view this crash as marking the beginning of the end to deregulation for local telephony. This situation will take some explaining View full abstract»

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  • FTC piles onto standardization Rambus' skullduggery

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 6 - 7, 86-7
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    The Rambus standardization skullduggery saga continues. SDRAM technology licensor Rambus sued chipmaker Infineon for patent infringement because Infineon refused to take a license under Rambus' patents. (SDRAMs are synchronous dynamic random-access memory chips. Instead of running asynchronously (like ordinary DRAMs), SDRAMs are refreshed by a synchronous system clock. By 1999, SDRAM had largely replaced asynchronous DRAM.) Infineon then countersued for common-law fraud based on Rambus' alleged abuse of the standard-setting process. After a trial in which the judge assessed $7 million in damages against Rambus, the company appealed to the Federal Circuit appeals court. After its recent hearing of the opposing arguments, the Federal Circuit will probably take at least six months to hand down an opinion. In June 2002, the Federal Trade Commission weighed in by suing Rambus for engaging in unfair competition, in violation of section 5 of the FTC Act View full abstract»

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  • The basics of performance-monitoring hardware

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 64 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (27)  |  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Most modern, high-performance processors have special, on-chip hardware that monitors processor performance. Data collected by this hardware provides performance information on applications, the operating system, and the processor. These data can guide performance improvement efforts by providing information that helps programmers tune the algorithms used by the applications and operating system, and the code sequences that implement those algorithms View full abstract»

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  • Pentium 4 performance-monitoring features

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 72 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (35)  |  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (274 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Intel Pentium 4's unique performance-monitoring features overcome many limitations and problems found in previous processors. Pentium 4 Xeon performance monitoring supports simultaneous multithreaded execution features View full abstract»

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  • Model-based system development

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (398 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distributed embedded computer systems are the key enablers of X-by-wire systems and control system functions. While developers can validate the correct operation of the communication and operating systems and the silicon implementations - the basis of embedded computer systems - once and for all, they cannot validate the application-dependent software and data structures in these systems in the same manner. The developer must configure the communication system for the respective application, create middleware code to access the communication system, and, last but not least, implement the application software. Because this is necessary for every new application, we need a well-defined process and a complementary set of tools to minimize error and support a high-quality development life cycle. We propose a model-based process - the "A" process. It consists of a sequence of models, each of which serves a specific purpose and hence contains only those pieces of information it requires for this purpose. The models are linked to each other by process transitions that either add information to or extract information from their predecessors. The A process guides the developer from one model to the next and is supported by a set Of tools. In this article, we discuss development process models in general, and our model-based process in particular View full abstract»

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  • Time-triggered architecture: a consistent computing platform

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 36 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The time-triggered architecture provides a consistent computing platform for large complex applications and safety-relevant systems. TTA is already in use in railway systems, and the aerospace and automotive industries are beginning to adopt it, with first products making their way into the field View full abstract»

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Erik R. Altman
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center