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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 3 • July-Sept. 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • US information retrieval system evolution and evaluation (1945-1975)

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):35 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Information retrieval has evolved through four phases: manual and mechanical devices; off line computing; online computing and vendor access; and distributed, networked, and mass computing. The article primarily addresses the first three phases. We examine IR systems in terms of four basic functions within a broader communications system context: analysis of document information content including ... View full abstract»

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  • Guest editor's conclusion: reflections on the evolution of library computing

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):75 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (241 KB) | HTML iconHTML
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Twin pillars of computing

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):88 - 87
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (189 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    First Page of the Article
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  • Imagining information retrieval in the library: Desk Set in historical context

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):14 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (271 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In the 1950s, a computer that could hold the contents of a library, retrieve facts and formulate questions was laughable to many. The 1957 movie "Desk Set" accurately mirrored the way ordinary citizens perceived computers and their possible consequences. On another level, the film's focus on libraries was an ideal juxtaposition of humans' intellectual capacity with machines' processing capacity. View full abstract»

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  • The Ford Foundation's search for an American library laboratory

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):56 - 74
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (333 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In the late 1950s, the Ford Foundation hoped that its library organization, the Council on Library Resources, would use its monies to sponsor a permanent library high-tech laboratory. After several years, Ford's techno-visions became tied to the hopes of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to enter the information field. Unfortunately, MIT's "Project Intrex" ended without meeting its s... View full abstract»

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  • Automating the library: the council on library resources

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):2 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (371 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    For the past 45 years, the free-spirited, sometimes colorful Council on Library Resources (now the Council on Library and Information Resources) has played a major role in helping libraries automate. This is the story of how a small band of foundation-financed promoters contributed instrumentally to the networked bibliographic services of today's libraries and to the achievements of digital-librar... View full abstract»

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  • Remembering the LFK network

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):79 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)

    The well-known Arpanet was the first operational packet-switching network. Almost completely unknown is what we claim was the second operational packet-switching network, the LFK network - although, admittedly, it was a fairly minimal network. Work on the LFK network began in 1970, and it was installed and accepted in 1972. It was used as part of a logistics system relating to the Norwegian Air Fo... View full abstract»

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  • Harley Tillitt and computerized library searching

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):23 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (572 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Responding to the needs of Korean War defense contractors, IBM built the 701 computer. Although its principal purpose was assisting aerospace research and development, other uses quickly developed. At China Lake Naval Ordnance Test Station, Harley Tillitt proposed an experiment to locate specific documents. The experiment was probably the first use of a computer for a library application. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu