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Technology and Society Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Sept.-Oct. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Engineers as revolutionaries

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 11 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (902 KB)  

    It is argued that a technology-driven revolution characterized by an exponentially changing reality is underway. Three categories of problems that result from these changes and cause social stress are discussed. They are: unanticipated consequences; inertial innovation, which is the continuous delivery of ever more sophisticated, higher cost technologies (e.g. defense and medical technology); and problems of deficient commercial innovation, which result from the growing economic importance of international trade to the US and the role of manufactured goods in that trade. In this context engineers are viewed as a revolutionary cadre, and their ability to offer effective answers to these problems is explored.<> View full abstract»

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  • Damned if you do and damned if you don't satellite launch

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 20 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (266 KB)  

    A hypothetical situation involving the launch of a satellite and the ethical questions it raises are discussed. The satellite is launched during a storm and is destroyed by lightning. The question is whether to comply with formal procedures and respect the chain-of-command, leaving questionable decisions to those who supposedly know how to make them well, or to intervene (by subterfuge if necessary) to keep people from doing senseless things. Responses are solicited for future publication.<> View full abstract»

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  • Science, technology and society education for engineers

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 22 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (623 KB)  

    The value of exposing engineering students to social issues raised by science and technology is discussed. A required engineering course at Lafayette College, 'Engineering Professionalism and Ethics', which is designed to provide all engineering majors with an introduction to science, technology, and society topics, is described. Experience with the course is evaluated.<> View full abstract»

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  • Bridging the gap between education and industry expectations in Africa

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 27 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (327 KB)  

    The problem of developing, at the university level, an approach that is not only responsive to regional problems, but also keeps abreast of changes in technology, is discussed. It is stressed that successful development of industry depends on the availability of a competent engineering workforce. The relationship between industry and universities in Africa is examined in the context of meeting both of these needs. The obstacles particular to Africa are identified, and ways to overcome them are suggested.<> View full abstract»

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  • International technical education: a comparative study of five countries

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 29 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (435 KB)  

    The criteria used in the US by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) for evaluating engineering programs are summarized. As an example, one university's electrical engineering curriculum is presented to illustrate how it meets the ABET criteria. The illustration also provides detailed aspects of the ABET requirements. Other countries' educational philosophies (Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, Turkey, and India) are discussed with regard to basic education, employment for graduates, funding, the role of the professor, and curriculum.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Technology and Society Magazine covers the impact of technology (as embodied by the fields of interest in IEEE) on society

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Katina Michael
School of Information Systems and Technology
University of Wollongong