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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Design and control of networks with dynamic nonhierarchical routing

    Page(s): 34 - 40
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    Dynamic routing concepts are described, and the design and control of dynamic routing networks is discussed. The vastly improved performance of the networks is illustrated with examples from operational experience. The evolution of dynamic routing with respect to several future directions is highlighted. These directions are extension to new networks and services, robust design and real-time adaptivity, and extension to interconnecting networks, including the Worldwide Intelligent Network.<> View full abstract»

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  • State-dependent dynamic traffic management for telephone networks

    Page(s): 42 - 53
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    Dynamic traffic management (DTM) is described. The overall system architecture and data flow, routing, and congestion control are addressed. The main design considerations are reviewed, focusing on the update cycle, protective allowance, multiple alternate routes, congestion-control thresholds, and algorithm extensions. The immediate benefits that automation and near-real-time responsiveness entail in traffic management are outlined. These lie in the areas of capital savings, traffic management automation, and trunk servicing.<> View full abstract»

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  • Distributed dynamic routing schemes

    Page(s): 54 - 58
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    Schemes that do not explicitly use much information about the state of networks are briefly surveyed, with the focus on dynamic alternative routing (DAR), a simple but highly effective routing method currently planned for the British Telecom Network. State-dependent routing and how some of the methodology also has bearing on the control issue are discussed. The problem of dimensioning a network that uses dynamic routing (i.e. how much capacity is needed and where it should be put to provide an acceptable performance) is addressed. A practical example, which refers to routing in an international access network, is discussed. Some conclusions are drawn on the benefits and drawbacks of distributed routing.<> View full abstract»

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  • Markov decision algorithms for dynamic routing (telephone networks)

    Page(s): 66 - 69
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    The nature of the traffic-routing problem is described, and early studies of state-dependent routing are noted. A state-dependent scheme seeks to route each call so as to minimize the risk of blocking future calls, and thus responds to the current state of the network on the basis of certain assumptions about future traffic demands. State-dependent routing is considered as a Markov decision process. How the relative costs can be determined for the case of direct routing is shown.<> View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic routing schemes for international networks

    Page(s): 70 - 75
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    Major issues that should be examined in evaluating the performance of networks with dynamic routing are reviewed. The characteristics of international 24-h traffic profiles are examined, and proposed dynamic routing schemes are described. Gain allocation principles are discussed, and results on circuit savings and fault tolerance of international dynamic routing networks are outlined.<> View full abstract»

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  • Advanced techniques for managing telecommunications networks

    Page(s): 76 - 81
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    The advanced techniques presently used by AT&T to manage traffic flow in its Worldwide Intelligent Network are described. The role of traffic network management strategies is reviewed, and the scope and routing plan of the AT&T Worldwide Intelligent Network are characterized. Three examples of modern protective controls are considered: selective trunk reservation, hard-to-reach process, and selective dynamic overload control. Advanced network management expansive controls and AT&T's traffic network management support systems are examined. Dynamic graphical analysis of network data, interactive training of network managers, and future trends impacting traffic network management are discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Advanced traffic control methods for network management

    Page(s): 82 - 88
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    The objectives of network management control are outlined, and two categories of control are defined: network traffic controls and network configuration controls. Network traffic controls are further classified into traffic volume controls and routing controls, and advanced techniques for achieving each of them are examined. Two classes of methods for specifying the amount of traffic to be controlled are described. In proportional control, a certain proportion of the traffic offered by each exchange is admitted; in threshold control, there is a maximum rate at which the traffic offered by each exchange is admitted. The TCS-V2 traffic-control system, an advanced automatic code-blocking system that uses area and subscriber congestion control, is considered, and the simulated performance of proportional control and threshold control is compared for this system. For routing control, an advanced state-dependent dynamic routing scheme is examined, and the results of a comparative evaluation of dynamic routing schemes are presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • Performance issues in the design of dynamically controlled circuit-switched networks

    Page(s): 90 - 95
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    The evolution of circuit-switched networks is analyzed with respect to the functional innovations that allowed for new traffic controls. The technical alternatives for routing techniques and their integration with congestion and flow control are considered. The performance of dynamically controlled networks is analyzed in the framework of research done at the Centre National d'Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET) together with studies carried out in other research laboratories. Comparisons are made of dynamic routing versus fixed hierarchical routing and time-dependent routing versus adaptive routing. For adaptive routing, centralized and isolated methods are compared. The benefits of advanced control methods are summarized.<> View full abstract»

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IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Sean Moore
Centripetal Networks