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Engineering Management Journal

Issue 3 • Date June 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Marketing without money

    Page(s): 108 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (262 KB)  

    The small growing business needs marketing spend as much as a big one, but can seldom afford it. You haven't got the money to throw at the marketing needs, and even if you do, you may not know exactly where to throw it without an expensive expert. Happily, you can achieve a tremendous amount at minimal cost or free. A significant proportion of a marketing budget is consumed by other people's time doing tasks you and your staff could do. Here, the author focuses on a range of ideas specific to business-to-business sales. The author starts with a general point: planning. Small businesses with a plan succeed better than those without one and waste less money. Actually writing down what you're going to do makes it work better because it forces you to clarify your thoughts, quantify your aims and expectations and put dates, costs and names against each activity. The author then discusses the use of billboards, business cards, door-to-door visiting, e-mails, press releases, database marketing and quarterly newsletters for marketing purposes. View full abstract»

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  • TRIZ: an inventive approach to invention

    Page(s): 117 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1077 KB)  

    Conceived over 50 years ago in Russia, the theory of inventive problem solving (TRIZ) has only recently reached the West. Faced with increasing demands and rising expectations from the market, a few firms are now using this approach to create new and improved products in a way that does not rely entirely on inspiration and chance discoveries. The author describes the beginnings of TRIZ and then describes the TRIZ process. The 40 inventive principles of TRIZ are listed. As an overall methodology, TRIZ can claim, through the contradiction matrix and the inventive principles, to be something new that breaks out of the currently popular methods of value engineering and systems engineering. View full abstract»

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  • How practical are your dreams? [investment appraisal and net present value]

    Page(s): 125 - 130
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (550 KB)  

    Most people find accounting and finance a complete yawn-making turn off. This is the first article in a series introducing the fundamentals of the subject in, hopefully, a light and easy-to-digest way. This article gives an introduction to investment appraisal or net present value. It compares money over time, and how to use net present value to cost a project. View full abstract»

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  • Designing transcendent products

    Page(s): 131 - 138
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1087 KB)  

    There is increasing demand for products which transcend fundamental trade-offs such as quality versus economy. However, existing design methods are of limited usefulness when it comes to developing these transcendent products. Transcendent products are those combinations of goods and services which transcend fundamental attribute trade-offs such as: sophistication versus price; personalisation versus delivery time; and quality versus availability. Transcendent products are usually retained by one person, one household or one organisation. In contrast, public transcendent products are always available to all. In the future, the design of private transcendent products will be a major factor in determining the standard of living experienced within nations, and the design of public transcendent products will be a major factor in determining quality of life. The emphasis of the design process for public transcendent products may often be different to that for private transcendent products. Both address physical design and organisational design but not necessarily in the same order. A proven way of bringing a structured approach to product design is the use of methodologies. These are based on fundamental design principles, which are realised through the application of methodology rules and strategies. Design principles for transcendent products are clarity, unity and flexibility. There is evidence of a lack of clarity, unity and flexibility in the design of Britain's public transport, public health care etc. A methodological approach is required to overcome these underlying problems because they stem from deeply rooted cultural values. View full abstract»

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  • Exploring subjectivity in hazard analysis

    Page(s): 139 - 144
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (839 KB)  

    In an earlier article, risk analysis was defined as comprising four stages-scope definition, hazard identification, hazard analysis, and risk assessment. Here, the subjectivity inherent in the third stage, hazard analysis, is examined. This article first considers the two aims of the process: to determine consequences and likelihood. It examines the ways in which subjectivity affects the numbers arrived at in both cases. Then it considers the use of the most usual top-down method, fault tree analysis (FTA), in arriving at them. Finally, there is a discussion of the findings. View full abstract»

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  • Management briefing

    Page(s): 111 - 112
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Intellectual property law cases

    Page(s): 115 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (337 KB)  

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  • A commentary on recent news trends

    Page(s): 113 - 114
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Aims & Scope

Engineering Management magazine covers management methods, techniques and processes relevant to engineers, incorporating project management, marketing, finance, law, quality and responsibilities of the engineer in society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dickon Ross
IET