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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • The pragmatic web

    Page(s): 4 - 5
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  • Marketplace - the IPv6 transition

    Page(s): 11 - 13
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  • Integrating Internet telephony services

    Page(s): 64 - 72
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    Cost savings and the ease of developing and adding new services have motivated great interest in Internet telephony, which integrates services provided by the Internet with the public switched telephone network (PSTN). Internet telephony relies on several protocols, including the real-time transport protocol (RTP) for multimedia data transport and the session initiation protocol (SIP) or H.323 for establishing and controlling sessions. SIP can integrate with other Internet services, such as email, the Web, voice mail, instant messaging, conference calling, and multimedia collaboration. We have implemented a SIP-based software suite called the Columbia Internet extensible multimedia architecture (Cinema), which we installed and integrated with the existing private branch exchange (PBX) infrastructure in the computer science department at Columbia University. The Cinema environment provides interoperability with the PSTN, programmable Internet telephony services, and IP-based voice mail. It also integrates Web access and e-mail for unified messaging and supports multiparty multimedia conferencing. The setup lets us extend our PBX capacity and will eventually let us replace it while keeping our existing phone numbers. It also provides an environment in which we can easily add new services and features, including interoperation with existing multimedia tools, e-mail access from standard. telephones, network appliance control, and instant messaging support. View full abstract»

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  • Agent system for inter-AS routing error diagnosis

    Page(s): 78 - 82
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    The basic unit of Internet routing is called an autonomous system, or AS, defined as a set of routers under a single technical administration. The Internet currently comprises more than 12,000 AS's. Some are university or corporate networks; others are ISP networks. Inside an AS, a single authority controls the deployment of policies and protocols by which routers compute intra-AS paths, including paths to gateway or border routers. For inter-AS routing, the situation is more complicated. Most AS's manage the exchange of routing information through the Internet Engineering Task Force's border gateway protocol. BGP lets an AS advertise "reachability" information throughout the Internet by sending update information when network topology or routing policies change. BGP is a hop-by-hop protocol, which sends the information only to a gateway router's immediate neighbors. At NTT Network Innovation Laboratories, we have developed and are currently testing a multiagent-based system called Encore to automatically diagnose inter-AS routing problems. We briefly describe the problem addressed by the system, its design and current implementation, and recent test results View full abstract»

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  • Web services interaction models. Current practice

    Page(s): 89 - 91
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    Each middleware approach has one or more interaction models associated with it that determine how applications built on top of the middleware interact with each other. Message-oriented middleware (MOM) applications interact rather simply, for example, by posting messages to and retrieving messages from queues. Object-oriented middleware applications such as those based on Corba or Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) interact by invoking methods on distributed objects. Because interaction models significantly influence the types of abstractions a middleware system makes available to applications, they figure prominently in determining the breadth and variety of application integration that the middleware supports. As Web services evolve, they too will acquire standard interaction models; otherwise, their use will be limited to small-scale proprietary systems, rather than providing the standards-based "middleware for middleware" for uniting disparate islands of integration. At this point, however, the industry and standards bodies have yet to reach consensus on Web services interaction models. I consider some of the problems associated with a popular current approach to Web services interaction models View full abstract»

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  • Trusted autonomy

    Page(s): 92 - 95
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    We describe how agents are the right building blocks for constructing trustworthy systems. Robust software and trusted autonomy represent the future for agent technology and software engineering View full abstract»

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  • Managing copyright in open networks

    Page(s): 18 - 26
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    The need for an electronic copyright management system (ECMS) that protects intellectual property rights (IPR) in open network environments continues to grow. Network security issues are classically handled through cryptography; however, cryptography ensures confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity only when a message is transmitted through a public channel, such as an open network. It does not protect against unauthorized copying after the message has been successfully transmitted. Digital watermarking is an effective way to protect copyright of multimedia data even after its transmission. A watermark, embedded in the data, can uniquely identify the document's owner or authorized user. The main problem with using watermark technology, for IPR protection, however, is its reversibility. Anyone who can read or detect the watermark can also remove it by inverting the watermark process. Our open network ECMS combines watermarking with cryptography to achieve reliable copyright protection while satisfying two contrasting requirements: actors in ECMS transactions must be able to verify that the watermark granting their rights is truly embedded in the multimedia document; and actors (other than the author) must not be able to remove the watermark View full abstract»

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  • Providing emergency services in Internet telephony

    Page(s): 39 - 47
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    Our primary focus is on emergency calling and notification. We describe the components of the existing emergency calling and notification systems and our proposed IP-based architectures, each of which uses the session initiation protocol (SIP) as the signaling framework. The architecture could increase speed, scalability, and functionality in communication services View full abstract»

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  • TPC-W: a benchmark for e-commerce

    Page(s): 83 - 87
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    When choosing an e-commerce site's hardware and software configuration, we need to know how a specific combination of Web servers, commerce servers, database servers, and supporting hardware will handle a desired load level. Benchmarks let us compare competing alternatives. Researchers have extensively studied workloads on Web sites that provide information and have characterized their performance at the level of HTTP requests. My colleagues and I have also conducted studies to understand e-commerce site workloads and to search for invariants that cut across more than one type of e-commerce site. However, there is currently only one available benchmark for e-commerce sites: TPC benchmark W, designed by the Transaction Processing Performance Council. I explore TPC-W's main features, advantages, and limitations View full abstract»

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  • Enabling distributed Corba access to smart card applications

    Page(s): 27 - 36
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    The OrbCard framework uses Corba wrapper technology to extend smart card services to a distributed computing environment View full abstract»

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  • Portal server technology

    Page(s): 73 - 77
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    To provide a consistent experience for customers, most Web site developers must integrate existing content with new content, server-side applications, and Web-based services. Increasingly, even basic sites are becoming more like traditional portals-a single, integrated point of access to information, applications, and people. Portals integrate diverse interaction channels at a central point, providing comprehensive context and an aggregated view across all information. Portals are largely based on existing Web application technology, such as Web servers and Java 2 Platform Enterprise Edition (J2EE). I present an overview of portal types and services, followed by a more detailed examination of portal-specific components and architectures View full abstract»

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  • Time synchronization for VoIP quality of service

    Page(s): 57 - 63
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    Various approaches seek to optimize the quality of service of VoIP applications. We propose a system that uses synchronized time to combine the useful characteristics of both fixed and adaptive buffer strategies, thereby improving VoIP quality of service. Using a combination of global positioning system (GPS) technologies and the network time protocol (NTP), hosts can learn the precise end-to-end delay for each packet. This information can benefit both domestic and business Internet telephony users. We outline our proposed system and discuss issues arising from the use of synchronized time View full abstract»

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  • Assessing voice quality in packet-based telephony

    Page(s): 48 - 56
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    Our goal is to extend recommendations ITU-T G.114 and G.131 to cover distorted phone calls transported (partly) over a packet-based network. We assume the user terminals to be optimally tuned and focus on how network parameters-delay, packet loss, jitter, and so on-influence voice quality. We then discuss how those parameters can be quantified and incorporated into a model that lets us predict the quality of any packet-based phone call View full abstract»

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IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

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Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University