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Network, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • The Galileo Orbiter: command and telemetry subsystems on their way to Jupiter

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 8 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB)  

    An overview is given of the Galileo system, which exemplifies the rigid, time-synchronized systems required by TDM (time division multiplexing). The spacecraft clock is examined, along with some of the rationale for the development of the clock structure and timing to give a sense of the design imperatives for rigidly synchronized systems. Additional subjects include the structure of the science and engineering frames, emphasizing the subcommutated structure of the engineering frame and its relationship to the spacecraft clock; ground processing for and basic uses of the telemetry; the various message types used to transmit commands to the spacecraft; and the generation processes for the command message types.<> View full abstract»

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  • CCSDS Advanced Orbiting Systems: international data communications standards for the space station Freedom

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 13 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (460 KB)  

    Established in 1982, the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) is an international organization that is staffed by data-handling experts from nearly all of the world's major space agencies. Its goal is to develop standard data-communications techniques so that several agencies may cross-support each other's data flow and thus allow complex, international missions to be flown. Under the general umbrella of Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS), an international CCSDS task force was formed in 1985 to develop standard data-communications concepts for manned missions, such as the space station Freedom and the Hermes space plane, and large unmanned vehicles, such as polar orbiting platforms. The history of the CCSDS and the development of the AOS recommendation are reviewed, and the user services and protocols embodied in its systems architecture are introduced.<> View full abstract»

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  • CCSDS telemetry systems experience at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 17 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (441 KB)  

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) designs, builds, manages, and operates science and applications spacecraft in near-Earth orbit, and provides data capture, data processing, and flight control services for these spacecraft. In addition, GSFC has the responsibility of providing space-ground and ground-ground communications for near-earth orbiting spacecraft, including those of the manned spaceflight programs. The goal of reducing both the developmental and operating costs of the end-to-end information system has led the GSFC to support and participate in the standardization activities of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS), including those for packet telemetry. The environment in which such systems function is described, and the Center's experience with CCSDS packet telemetry in the context of the Gamma Ray Observatory Project is discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Overview of the space station communications networks

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 22 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (678 KB)  

    Within the Space Station Freedom Program (SSSP), the communications and dataprocessing capabilities that will be used to handle the operational and scientific information needs will be provided by a space station information and communications system. This system will be composed of a variety of elements, networks, and subnetworks. The networks and how they are interconnected are described. The discussion covers communications system elements and services, elements of the onboard systems, wide-area transport network elements, and command and control elements.<> View full abstract»

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  • Data services for space station Freedom

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 29 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB)  

    The data services that are available between the space station Freedom and the users of Freedom located on the ground are described from a user's perspective. These services consist of path service on the onboard LAN to provide minimum service and maximum throughput for telemetry, ISO protocol services on the LAN to provide robust end-to-end communications and applications services, path and bitstream services over dedicated high-rate links from payloads to communications and tracking system input ports for telemetry, audio service for two-way voice communications with the ground, and video services for two-way videoconferencing and standard video-image data. The space station will use virtual channels (VCSs) to deliver predefined data sets (packaged in a VC) to the correct destinations for data traveling in both the forward (ground-to-space) and return (space-to-ground) directions. The VC provides a means of dividing the single physical RF link into a number of smaller 'virtual' links that can be reassigned as required, and also of creating a virtual link between the two end points of the VC.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo