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Computer

Issue 5 • Date May 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
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  • Creative evolutionary systems [Book Review]

    Page(s): 99
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Digital watermarking [Book Review]

    Page(s): 99
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Unlocking the clubhouse: women in computing [Book Review]

    Page(s): 99
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reuse-based software engineering: techniques, organizations, and controls [Book Review]

    Page(s): 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (367 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Household hints for embedded systems designers

    Page(s): 106 - 108
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    I spend a lot of time working on tools for embedded system design-hardware-software codesign, system scheduling, software optimization. I've worked on them because I think that good tools are important. They help make design tasks possible that would otherwise be impossible; they also help provide the discipline that produces working systems and minimizes working nights. But tools don't necessarily have to be complex or specially designed for embedded systems. just as you can use a screwdriver to open a can, you can adapt existing, everyday programs to new uses for embedded computing. View full abstract»

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  • If you didn't test it, it doesn't work

    Page(s): 11 - 13
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    Because engineers generally cannot test their creations to the point of saturation, they must make do with a lot of substitutions: anticipation of all possible failure modes; a comprehensive set of requirements; dedicated validation and verification teams; designing with a built-in safety margin; formal verification where possible; and testing, testing, testing. If you did not test it, it does not work. In some cases, computers have become fast enough to permit testing every combination of bit patterns. Many, perhaps most, things you design cannot be tested to saturation. So it behooves us to try to anticipate how our designs will be used, certainly under nominal conditions, but also under non-nominal conditions, which usually place the system under higher stress. The paper considers how programmers have a range of techniques at their disposal View full abstract»

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  • The chamois component-based knowledge engineering framework

    Page(s): 45, 47 - 54
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    A prototype software framework and research testbed exploits recent findings in knowledge engineering to power an electronic commerce application. Chamois combines two main components. The infrastructure component consists of software products and prototype modules that provide key knowledge engineering technologies. The application component uses the infrastructure as a data and knowledge resource. We chose the primary application, an electronic commerce system, as our validation candidate because it includes various functional components that use the underlying knowledge engineering technology. These components include personalization, security, quality-of-service transmission of multimedia data, querying, and XML document management View full abstract»

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  • There's more than one way to build a bridge

    Page(s): 102 - 103
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    Software engineering is essentially about making good design and implementation decisions, which requires first considering design alternatives. Given the advanced programming tools available today, it is tempting to design by rote using the solution a given tool most readily supports. Although many of the problems that system developers face often result from poor management, sound software engineering can make a difference in at least one key area: the bridge connecting the legacy system with other computer systems View full abstract»

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  • Would a digital brain have a mind?

    Page(s): 112 - 111
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    Although the human brain and the digital computer share many traits, simulating the mind in silicon may be impossible. Obvious parallels exist between the brain and digital computers. To fulfill their responsibility to themselves, and to others who might be misled by journalistic hyperbole, computing professionals should have well-founded opinions about the extent of these parallels. The profession should refrain from applying humanistic names to its mechanistic endeavors, and it must be conscious always of the essential differences between people and computers View full abstract»

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  • Smart graphics: a new approach to meeting user needs

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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    A convergence of computer graphics and other technologies such as artificial intelligence is leading to the development of smart graphics, which recognize application requirements, user characteristics, host-machine capabilities, and target usage, and adapt themselves accordingly. These new, dynamic capabilities extend the utility of computer graphics across a broad range of uses and potential applications. They may also engender the creation of new applications. For example, smart-graphics bar charts could change in accordance with fluctuating stock-market conditions. Developers could use smart graphics to customize GUIs and thus make them more useful. In addition, the technology has the potential to revolutionize graphics use in training, simulation, business productivity, and other applications View full abstract»

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  • End-to-end testing of IP QoS mechanisms

    Page(s): 80 - 87
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    Voice quality provides a valid metric for testing the effectiveness of quality-of-service mechanisms in preserving the quality of voice streams in IP network traffic View full abstract»

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  • Technology standards pros aid homeland security

    Page(s): 104 - 105
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    On 15 November 2001, the executive board of the International Committee for Information Technology Standards approved a new CD-based geographic information standard. Security experts consider this standard to be integral to homeland security because military facilities and commercial airports will use it in key functions such as site and environmental planning. Two weeks later, the INCITS executive board announced the formation of a new technical committee, MI, devoted to biometrics standards. In this case, standards professionals and other subject matter experts will directly support the US Patriot Act through their work. These two examples show how de jure standards work through a streamlined process that enables emerging technologies to solve urgent problems. They belie a popular notion that market-driven, relevant standards must come from consortia formed on the fly View full abstract»

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  • A pattern for softcoded values

    Page(s): 28 - 34
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    The authors describe an approach to data modeling that uses object-oriented methods to define a pattern for building flexible and maintainable database applications. An equipment example describes an application of this pattern in industry. We use the popular Unified. Modeling Language (UML) notation (a comprehensive suite of object-oriented models intended to represent software applications fully) to illustrate some of the mechanics of the pattern's implementation View full abstract»

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  • US approves new uses for wireless technology

    Page(s): 27
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    In a controversial move, the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has approved commercial use of ultrawideband technology, which promises faster and more secure wireless transmissions. UWB, which is currently used for such purposes as determining what potential objects are underground in areas where highway construction will take place, transmits at low power levels. The technology thus may prove useful for small devices, such as smart cellular phones, with limited power resources View full abstract»

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  • Data mining for the corporate masses?

    Page(s): 22 - 24
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    For several years, proponents have touted data mining as a powerful tool for finding patterns hidden in large databases. They promise many benefits, such as increased revenues for companies that use the technology to fine tune their marketing by digging out customers' buying patterns from mountains of sales data. Until recently, however, data mining has been a complex, expensive, somewhat limited tool adopted primarily by large companies. This pattern may be changing, though, because of new techniques and technologies. The paper considers several key data mining trends that have emerged and discusses standards for various aspects of data mining View full abstract»

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  • Software development: an outsider's view

    Page(s): 36 - 44
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    Comparing software with other disciplines and industries can help resolve the perennial debate between those who advocate an engineering approach to development and those who advocate a craft-based approach. Our ultimate goal should be to simply and directly raise the profile of software generally, respecting and making explicit its unique structures and important role in society, and creating training opportunities, research projects, and tools to support it. Such efforts move software not only beyond current methodology debates but also closer and more understandably to the world outside looking in View full abstract»

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  • Deterministic preemptive scheduling of real-time tasks

    Page(s): 72 - 79
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    Algorithms for the preemptive scheduling of deterministic, real-time tasks can have applications in providing quality-of-service guarantees to packet flows in multichannel optical networks View full abstract»

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  • Next steps for mobile entertainment portals

    Page(s): 63 - 70
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    Mobile entertainment portals are already appearing, but game designers lack tools for designing content and services. One approach is to use argumentation for hypothesizing the consequences of actions and interactions in a game world View full abstract»

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  • E-business process modeling: the next big step

    Page(s): 55 - 62
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    The authors propose a process coordination framework for Web services and outline the building blocks required for e-business automation. Their framework helps in understanding the roles of various standards and in identifying overlaps, gaps, and opportunities for convergence View full abstract»

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  • Will new chip revolutionize digital photography?

    Page(s): 25 - 26
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    A company founded by well-known physicist, technologist, and inventor Carver Mead has developed a light-sensing chip that promises to radically change digital photography. Mead's company, Foveon, spent four years developing the X3 photographic sensor chip, which delivers two to four times the image resolution of other comparable digital-camera chips. Most digital cameras use charge-coupled-device technology. In the CCD process, light-sensitive integrated circuits store and display an image's data, converting each pixel into an electrical charge whose intensity corresponds to a specific color. These cameras use a mosaic filter with chip sensors that each detect just one color: red, green, or blue. Within the X3 chip, each sensor can detect red, green, and blue, depending on how far the captured light penetrates through layers of silicon-based color filters. The first X3-based cameras are scheduled to ship in the near future. National Semiconductor will build most of each chip, while Foveon will handle the final steps View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington