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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 3 • Date Mar 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Formal methods application: an empirical tale of software development

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):308 - 320
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (366 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The development of an elevator scheduling system by undergraduate students is presented. The development was performed by 20 teams of undergraduate students, divided into two groups. One group produced specifications by employing a formal method that involves only first-order logic. The other group used no formal analysis. The solutions of the groups are compared using the metrics of code correctn... View full abstract»

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  • Models of parallel applications with large computation and I/O requirements

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):286 - 307
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (963 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    A fundamental understanding of the interplay between computation and I/O activities in parallel applications that manipulate huge amounts of data is critical to achieving good application performance, as well as correctly characterizing the workloads of large-scale high-performance parallel systems. We present a formal model of the behavior of CPU and I/O interactions in scientific applications, f... View full abstract»

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  • An authentication logic with formal semantics supporting synchronization, revocation, and recency

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):256 - 285
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (549 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Distributed systems inherently involve dynamic changes to the value of security-relevant attributes such as the goodness of encryption keys, trustworthiness of participants, and synchronization between principals. Since concurrent knowledge is usually infeasible or impractical, it is often necessary for the participants of distributed protocols to determine and act on beliefs that may not be suppo... View full abstract»

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  • Knowledge-based automation of a design method for concurrent systems

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):228 - 255
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1358 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This paper describes a knowledge-based approach to automate a software design method for concurrent systems. The approach uses multiple paradigms to represent knowledge embedded in the design method. Semantic data modeling provides the means to represent concepts from a behavioral modeling technique, called Concurrent Object-Based Real-time Analysis (COBRA), which defines system behavior using dat... View full abstract»

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  • A classification of noncircular attribute grammars based on the look-ahead behavior

    Publication Year: 2002, Page(s):210 - 227
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (473 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    We propose a family of static evaluators for subclasses of the well-defined (i.e., noncircular) attribute grammars. These evaluators augment the evaluator for the absolutely noncircular attribute grammars with look-ahead behaviors. Because this family covers exactly the set of all well-defined attribute grammars, well-defined attribute grammars may be classified into a hierarchy, called the NC hie... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org