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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Mar 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • An authentication logic with formal semantics supporting synchronization, revocation, and recency

    Page(s): 256 - 285
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (549 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distributed systems inherently involve dynamic changes to the value of security-relevant attributes such as the goodness of encryption keys, trustworthiness of participants, and synchronization between principals. Since concurrent knowledge is usually infeasible or impractical, it is often necessary for the participants of distributed protocols to determine and act on beliefs that may not be supported by the current state of the system. Policies for determining beliefs in such situations can range from extremely conservative, such as only believing statements if they are very recent, to extremely optimistic, such as believing all statements that are not yet known to be revoked. Such security policies often are heavily dependent on timing of received messages and on synchronization between principals. We present a logic for analyzing cryptographic protocols that has the capability to specify time and synchronization details. This capability considerably advances the scope of known techniques both for expressing practical authentication policies of protocol participants as constraints and for reasoning about protocol goals subject to these constraints View full abstract»

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  • Models of parallel applications with large computation and I/O requirements

    Page(s): 286 - 307
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (963 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A fundamental understanding of the interplay between computation and I/O activities in parallel applications that manipulate huge amounts of data is critical to achieving good application performance, as well as correctly characterizing the workloads of large-scale high-performance parallel systems. We present a formal model of the behavior of CPU and I/O interactions in scientific applications, from which we derive various formulas that characterize application performance. Our model captures the I/O and CPU activity at different levels of granularity, where results from the model are shown to be in excellent agreement with measurement data from a set of I/O-intensive applications. Using the formulas from our model, which explicitly take I/O activity into account, we also present examples of possible applications of the model View full abstract»

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  • A classification of noncircular attribute grammars based on the look-ahead behavior

    Page(s): 210 - 227
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (473 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose a family of static evaluators for subclasses of the well-defined (i.e., noncircular) attribute grammars. These evaluators augment the evaluator for the absolutely noncircular attribute grammars with look-ahead behaviors. Because this family covers exactly the set of all well-defined attribute grammars, well-defined attribute grammars may be classified into a hierarchy, called the NC hierarchy, according to their evaluators in the family. The location of a noncircular attribute grammar in the NC hierarchy is an intrinsic property of the grammar. The NC hierarchy confirms a result of Riis and Skyum (1981), which says that all well-defined attribute grammars allow a (static) pure multivisit evaluator by actually constructing such an evaluator. We also show that, for any finite m, an NC(m) attribute grammar can be transformed to an equivalent NC(0) grammar View full abstract»

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  • Formal methods application: an empirical tale of software development

    Page(s): 308 - 320
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (366 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of an elevator scheduling system by undergraduate students is presented. The development was performed by 20 teams of undergraduate students, divided into two groups. One group produced specifications by employing a formal method that involves only first-order logic. The other group used no formal analysis. The solutions of the groups are compared using the metrics of code correctness, conciseness, and complexity. Particular attention is paid to a subset of the formal methods group which provided a full verification of their implementation. Their results are compared to other published formal solutions. The formal methods group's solutions are found to be far more correct than the informal solutions View full abstract»

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  • Knowledge-based automation of a design method for concurrent systems

    Page(s): 228 - 255
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1358 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a knowledge-based approach to automate a software design method for concurrent systems. The approach uses multiple paradigms to represent knowledge embedded in the design method. Semantic data modeling provides the means to represent concepts from a behavioral modeling technique, called Concurrent Object-Based Real-time Analysis (COBRA), which defines system behavior using data/control flow diagrams. Entity-relationship modeling is used to represent a design metamodel based on a design method, called COncurrent Design Approach for Real-Time Systems (CODARTS), which represents concurrent designs as software architecture diagrams, task behavior specifications and module specifications. Production rules provide the mechanism for codifying a set of CODARTS heuristics that can generate concurrent designs based on semantic concepts included in COBRA behavioral models and on entities and relationships included in CODARTS design metamodels. Together, the semantic data model, the entity-relationship model, and the production rules, when encoded using an expert system shell, compose CODA, an automated designer's assistant. CODA is applied to generate 10 concurrent designs for four real-time problems. The paper reports the degree of automation achieved by CODA. The paper also evaluates the quality of generated designs by comparing the similarity between designs produced by CODA and human designs reported in the literature for the same problems. In addition, it compares CODA with four other approaches used to automate software design methods View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org