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Network, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Author Index

    Page(s): 42 - 43
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  • Subject index

    Page(s): 43 - 47
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  • An integrated service architecture for managing capital market systems

    Page(s): 15 - 19
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    This article studies current developments and trends in the area of capital market systems. In particular, it defines the trading lifecycle and the activities associated with it. The article then investigates opportunities for the integration of legacy systems and existing communication protocols through distributed integrated services that correspond to established business processes. These integrated services link to basic services such as an exchange, a settlement, or a registry service. Examples of such integrated services include pre-trade services (e.g., analytics) or post-trade services (e.g., surveillance). The article then presents the various levels of integration in capital market systems and discusses the standards in place. It establishes that most interactions occur at a low level of abstraction such as the network (e.g., TCP/IP), data format (e.g., FIX, XML), and middleware levels (e.g., CORBA). Finally, the article discusses a software development methodology based on the use of design patterns. These design patterns address the essential aspects of managing integrated services in a technology-independent fashion. These aspects are service wrapping, service composition, service contracting, service discovery, and service execution. The objective of the methodology is to facilitate the rapid development of new integrated services that correspond to emerging business opportunities View full abstract»

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  • Projecting advanced enterprise network and service management to active networks

    Page(s): 28 - 33
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    Active networks is a promising technology that allows us to control the behavior of network nodes by programming them to perform advanced operations and computations. Active networks are changing considerably the scenery of computer networks and, consequently, affect the way network management is conducted. Current management techniques can be enhanced and their efficiency can be improved, while novel techniques can be deployed. This article discusses the impact of active networks on current network management practice by examining network management through the functional areas of fault, configuration, accounting, performance and security management. For each one of these functional areas, the limitations of the current applications and tools are presented, as well as how these limitations can be overcome by exploiting active networks. To illustrate the presented framework, several applications are examined. The contribution of this work is to analyze, classify, and assess the various models proposed in this area, and to outline new research directions View full abstract»

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  • A multi-agent decision support system for stock trading

    Page(s): 20 - 27
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    A distributed problem solving system can be characterized as a group of individual cooperating agents running to solve common problems. As dynamic application domains continue to grow in scale and complexity, it becomes more difficult to control the purposeful behavior of agents, especially when unexpected events may occur. This article presents an information and knowledge exchange framework to support distributed problem solving. From the application viewpoint the article concentrates on the stock trading domain; however, many presented solutions can be extended to other dynamic domains. It addresses two important issues: how individual agents should be interconnected so that their resources are efficiently used and their goals accomplished effectively; and how information and knowledge transfer should take place among the agents to allow them to respond successfully to user requests and unexpected external situations. The article introduces an architecture, the MASST system architecture, which supports dynamic information and knowledge exchange among the cooperating agents. The architecture uses a dynamic blackboard as an interagent communication paradigm to facilitate factual data, business rule, and command exchange between cooperating MASST agents. The critical components of the MASST architecture have been implemented and tested in the stock trading domain, and have proven to be a viable solution for distributed problem solving based on cooperating agents View full abstract»

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  • On the migration from enterprise management to integrated service level management

    Page(s): 8 - 14
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    Enterprise management is concerned with the integrated management of enterprise-wide applications with underlying network and systems management. Service level management (SLM) provides a mechanism for linking business requirements with the specification of integrated management systems. SLM is popular in industry, although the meaning of "service" varies depending on to whom one is talking. Sometimes a service is understood with respect to networking elements alone (e.g., router throughput), sometimes in terms of application performance (e.g., packet latency), and sometimes in terms of user perception (e.g., URL response time). In this article we provide a multi-agent framework for integrated SLM that subsumes these different approaches into a single comprehensive top-down management system from a high-level business perspective. This multi-agent-based system is illustrated with a case study of a typical enterprise in the United States, showing how enterprise management is migrating to the concept of service management View full abstract»

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  • Mobile agents and their use for information retrieval: a brief overview and an elaborate case study

    Page(s): 34 - 41
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    Mobile agents emerged in the mid-1990s, and have raised considerable interest in the research community. The proponents associate several benefits with their use. However, there are still very few quantitative measurements to back the claimed benefits. This article is devoted to mobile agents and their use for information retrieval. We provide a brief overview and an elaborate case study. The overview introduces the concept of mobile agent, enumerates the claimed benefits, and reviews the hindrances to widescale deployment. It also discusses the state of the art of mobile-agent-based information retrieval, including the very few quantitative studies that exist. Our case study is on information retrieval from electronic calendars for multiparty event scheduling. Many events require the participation of several parties. Prior knowledge of the date when most (if not all) targeted participants are available is often a prerequisite for scheduling them. However, identifying this date can easily turn into a nightmare, especially when the number of targeted participants is large. Nowadays, electronic agendas (e.g., MS Outlook) are stored on servers. An application can access them, retrieve information on the availability of the targeted participants, and derive the date from the information. In the case study, a mobile agent is dispatched in the network, instead of retrieving the information using the client/server paradigm. The agent visits the servers, accesses the agendas, retrieves the information, and identifies the date. Finding a date suitable for several potential participants may require the rescheduling of some events that have been previously arranged by some participants. We propose the use of agents that act as the personal agents of the participants for the negotiation inherent to this rescheduling. The measurements we have made indicate clearly that the mobile-agent-based approach outperforms its client/server counterpart even when the latter is optimized. These results can easily be transposed to most information retrieval applications, and demonstrate, for this specific application domain, the performance benefit associated with mobile agents. We now dispatch a single agent in the network. In the future, we will dispatch several agents View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo