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Computing in Science & Engineering

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2002

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Guest editors' introduction: Biocomputation

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 18 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • DNA lattices: A method for molecular-scale patterning and computation

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 32 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1047 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    DNA lattice research can provide unprecedented capabilities for molecular-scale computation and programmable pattern formation. The field has applications to many other emerging technologies in molecular nanotechnology. This article outlines some of the steps being taken to develop these applications. View full abstract»

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  • The fireworks effect: exploring trajectory sets in time

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 92 - 97
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (122 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many students in physics and engineering courses often grapple with the mathematics they encounter and struggle to extract meaning from the analytic material they are learning, Much can be done computationally at this level to ask questions about and explore analytic functions or results in a numeric environment. Much can be done to help explain the analytic material that students must master if they gain some facility with software that provides a rich numeric environment, such as Mathcad or MATLAB. Often, approaching the same subject from different angles (here, analytic and numeric) helps the bridge-building process of learning. As an example of such an approach, where the opportunity for exploration is always present, I consider here two basic problems: trajectories under a constant force (where the behavior of a trajectory set illuminates the collective motion of a fireworks display) or under a Hooke's law force. The solutions for these examples are well known, yet the material is sufficiently rich so as to offer new insights when new questions are asked and explored. View full abstract»

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  • Using mathematical models to cope with complex computer simulations

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 64 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The authors present techniques to simplify complex computer simulations by partitioning parameter spaces and by using mathematical tools to visualize implementation effects View full abstract»

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  • Java at middle age: enabling Java for computational science

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 74 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Java's early history explains its lure to this day. Java is alive and well, running on just about every computing platform, from handhelds to high-end servers such as multiprocessors. Implementations of Java for Windows, Macintosh (including OS X), and Linux have all reached sufficient maturity and are in widespread use. Performance and resource usage remain a problem in most Java implementations, but the language is improving all the time. In this article, I examine the lure of Java for computational science, discuss the Java Grande effort to work with Sun, and identify areas for improvement. I focus on language and implementation issues that must be solved for Java to be taken seriously for computationally focused codes. As a motivational tool, I include a number of reflections on the C# language from Microsoft, which many claim is nothing more than Java with a new syntax. I excise a number of sections from the specification documentation to demonstrate that specific Java Grande Forum (JGF) recommendations are implemented in the current version of Microsoft's C#. What is particularly interesting (but not necessarily verifiable) is that language appearing in the Microsoft C# specification proper often appears to paraphrase similar points raised in the JGF documents available at www.javagrande.org View full abstract»

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  • SunRay: a cost-effective desktop computer solution

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 15 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (398 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In distributed computing, a majority of the computing power in a local area network resides in the computers that users directly access. Researchers learned that placing the computational resources as close as possible to the end users prevented a resource bottleneck at the supercomputer, reduced the networking cost, and provided superior service to users. improved network and server technologies, increased administrative costs, and reliability concerns have led Sun Microsystems to introduce SunRay. SunRay promises to bring back the days of centralized servers accessed by dumb terminals, now more appropriately called network appliances. A SunRay is a relatively simple piece of computer hardware designed exclusively to accept input from the user through the mouse or keyboard, deliver that information to a centralized server, receive calculation results from the server, and display those results on the monitor It is stateless, so it does not contain a hard drive or any other memory designed to maintain information about the user's actions. All the operating system information SunRay needs is programmed into its firmware, so software upgrades are not necessary on the client machines. If an update is needed, the administrator issues the appropriate command on the server, and all SunRays then download the update when rebooted View full abstract»

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  • Automated assignment of backbone NMR peaks using constrained bipartite matching

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 50 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (578 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Peak assignment is a key step in solving protein structures using nuclear magnetic resonance. The authors present a new computational framework for automating this process, particularly for backbone resonance peak assignment, as a constrained weighted bipartite matching problem. Although it's NP-hard, they have developed a rigorous algorithm to solve the problem View full abstract»

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  • Comparing gnomes

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 42 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The theory behind biocomputing is to look to biological structures and processes for new ways of solving difficult computational problems. But this, need not, be a one-way street: advances in computing can feed back into the study of biology, leading to better biotechnological tools View full abstract»

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  • Rendering avatars in virtual reality: integrating a 3D model with 2D images

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 86 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (775 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Image-based rendering uses images or photographs to replace geometric models. This technique achieves shorter modeling time, faster rendering speed, and more realism. It also addresses different approaches for turning images into models and then into renderings - including panoramas, image warping, and light fields. In this article, we introduce a hybrid approach that integrates a 3D avatar geometric model with 2D images to achieve more realistic avatars as well as speed up avatar rendering in realtime virtual environments View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and analyzing biomolecular networks

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 20 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The authors argue for the need to model and analyze biological networks at molecular and cellular levels. They propose a computational toolbox for biologists. Central to their approach is the paradigm of hybrid models in which discrete events are combined with continuous differential equations to capture switching behavior View full abstract»

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  • Computer science today in the European Union

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 10 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (122 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article attempts to paint a picture of computer science (CS) today in the 15 European Union countries. We focus on the EU countries rather than Western Europe as a whole because of the availability of EU statistical data. We hope to give a general view of how EU computer science (called informatics in many EU countries) research and development compares to that in the US, within the context of general scientific research and education in the EU View full abstract»

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  • Computer-aided paleontology: a new look for dinosaurs

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 5 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (390 KB)  

    Over the past 150 years, our perception of how dinosaurs looked has changed on the basis of museum displays and artists' renditions. Reproductions of lumbering dinosaurs at London's Crystal Palace during the mid 1800s look little like the creatures in the 40-year-old murals at Yale University's Peabody Museum of Natural History, or the computer-animated images of agile animals depicted in the Jurassic Park movies and recent television documentaries. Now, researchers are combining techniques from computer-aided design, rapid prototyping, and biomechanics to develop more accurate theories of dinosaurs' posture and movements. This information will affect paleontologists' concepts of how the animals lived and what they ate. Perhaps the most notable example of this synergy of paleontology and computing-related fields has been the restoration of the Smithsonian Institution's trademark dinosaur -a triceratops mounted some 90 years ago - as part of a refurbishing of the dinosaur hall in the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computing in Science & Engineering presents scientific and computational contributions in a clear and accessible format.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George K. Thiruvathukal
Loyola University