Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, single article purchases and IEEE account management will be unavailable from 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM ET (12:00 - 16:00 UTC). We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 2002

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • How to make deregulation work

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 50 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (411 KB)  

    Every regulated industry manifests the same rules, while each deregulated industry is unruly or even dysfunctional in ways unique to it. Figuring out how to fix each one's problems is in its own right a huge technological challenge-technological in the economist's sense of referring to all aspects of business organization. Alfred Kahn, the father of airline deregulation, continues to publish frequently on all aspects of regulation and to give testimony when his views are solicited, which they frequently are. In the interview given in this article, Kahn expresses skepticism about introducing consumer choice in electricity, mounts a robust defense of airline deregulation, and expresses some optimism about the prospects of making local telephone systems more competitive. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Critical challenges 2002

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (39 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A new course for NASA

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 14 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Futility of a toothless treaty

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 15 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An archeologist's year in silicon valley [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 86 - 88
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (89 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • To disarm [weapons abolition]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 30 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (719 KB)  

    This article describes how recent events have brought a renewed urgency to halting the spread of massively destructive weapons, whether nuclear, chemical, or biological. The concern of the moment is that these deadly devices not fall into the hands of extremists. There may also be a growing sense that what will ultimately make the world a safer place is to eliminate all weapons of mass destruction permanently. Amid fresh fears of a nuclear, chemical or biological attack, abolition no longer seems a crazy idea View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Making intelligence smarter

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 38 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    After a decade of drift in which intelligence agencies seemed to be casting about for a mission worthy of their big budgets, they have at last found one. But in adapting to global terrorism inspired by Islamist fundamentalism, those agencies will be forced to reassess many long-held customs and beliefs. They will have to find new human assets, including spies and analysts, and new ways to use their technical infrastructures, while cooperating more actively with domestic partners and with foreign intelligence services of every stripe. Agencies must find a new balance between electronic eavesdropping and spies on the ground to counter global terrorism View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Improving security, preserving privacy

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 44 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (519 KB)  

    Although terrorism is probably the focus of most people's current concern, the need for protection from such nightmares as workplace and school violence has been fanning a demand for more secure environments for some time. Proposed solutions range from the simple, like putting better locks on doors, to the experimental, like automatic face-recognition systems. On a long-term basis, they even include architectural measures: designing buildings so that bomb-laden trucks cannot readily approach them. The privacy aspects of such surveillance are discussed in this article View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Capturing climate change

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 58 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (684 KB)  

    Though for decades arguments have raged over whether human activities cause changes in climate, these battles may be nearing an end. It is hard to dispute that the earths climate is getting warmer. The apparent reason is a measurable increase in greenhouse gases, most notably carbon dioxide, but also methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and ozone. Some do disagree. And this group, while not large, is vocal. Some accept the evidence for a warming planet, but not that it is due to human activities. Others think a negative feedback effect will kick in or that the effects will be minor or even positive. But many scientists say global warming is real and will have serious effects. They also believe that nothing we do now can immediately stop it. Our best efforts, though important, will only slow it down. The questions of today are how well the effects can be predicted and how to cope with them. This paper discusses the evidence for global warming and climate models to test the theory. The possible effects of global warming are described. The political action being taken regarding global warming are discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Building safer cars

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 82 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (31)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    In the future, cars will help make the world's roads nearly accident free. Humans are fallible: we get sleepy while driving at night, do dumb things like put on makeup or shave while creeping along in bumper-to-bumper traffic, or look away from the road to adjust our car radios. But cars will soon make road travel safer by looking over drivers' shoulders, so to speak, keeping their attention from being pulled away from the road, and finding ways to reduce the hazard should a driver's focus stray. To this end, researchers envision smart systems that give the driver "the right information, in the right way, at the right time". R&D programs are advancing toward a smart car capable of reducing the number of stimuli, some of them simultaneous, to which a driver must react, or taking over elements of the driving task such as braking or steering. Adaptive cruise control (ACC) systems are being developed which combine radar- or laser-based sensors that scan the road ahead with throttle and brake actuators, to maintain a safe, preset minimum distance between cars in the same lane View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Where the jobs are

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 89 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (48 KB)  

    Despite the avalanche of layoffs in assorted industries, elsewhere things are booming for electrical engineering, including defense, health care, and patent-related fields. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, recent graduates with bachelor's degrees in electrical engineering should be greeted by a favorable job market this year. Looking ahead, the bureau further predicts overall demand for electrical engineers to remain strong, with EE employment rising 26 percent and 93000 new positions added over the decade ending in 2008.The prognosis for 2002 is not all bad for EE employment View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Extending healthcare's reach

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 66 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (534 KB)  

    Telemedicine, or treating patients from afar, promises to alter the medical landscape. Technological solutions are being implemented that can spread critical medical expertise across a region and around the globe. For example, a U.S. company believes that the shortage of physicians specializing in intensive care can be mitigated by its telemedicine system. The performance of transatlantic surgery by remote control proved that, with the right equipment, surgeons can perform and teach advanced procedures from thousands of kilometers away. Finally, in the nations and territories of the Pacific Rim, healthcare information networks are granting the regions widely scattered citizens new access to medical expertise View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Clear skies ahead [navigation systems]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 78 - 81
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    Several projects aimed squarely at upgrading airplane travel, either by enhancing navigation or by improving communications between pilots and air traffic controllers, drew closer to full implementation in 2001. In mid-June, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Washington, DC, outlined its 10-year operational evolution plan to improve air travel by rolling out new technology to air traffic control facilities. All the systemwide projects target congestion in the skies and on the runways. For too long a time, too many airports were scheduling too many takeoffs or landings for any given period, driving the numbers of delays up. After 11 September, safer air travel became the burning issue. But congestion will no doubt return to prominence once airlines resume full schedules. Meantime, the global positioning system (GPS) satellite constellation and improved situational awareness tools are beginning to enhance safety now, and will alleviate congestion when it returns View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Waste not, pollute not [animal waste recycling for power production]

    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 72 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (797 KB)  

    Recycling animal waste can keep water cleaner and generate electricity off the grid. The paper describes the use of animal waste in the form of biogas at AA Dairy to produce electricity. The gas is burned in a diesel engine converted to run on methane. 10-20% of the electricity produced in summer is sold to the grid, the figure rises to 35-40% in winter. The paper then discusses the wider picture of bioenergy conversion at farms in the USA. The chemical impact on groundwater and soil stewardship are also discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine