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Network, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • A survey on position-based routing in mobile ad hoc networks

    Page(s): 30 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (122 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present an overview of ad hoc routing protocols that make forwarding decisions based on the geographical position of a packet's destination. Other than the destination's position, each node need know only its own position and the position of its one-hop neighbors in order to forward packets. Since it is not necessary to maintain explicit routes, position-based routing does scale well even if the network is highly dynamic. This is a major advantage in a mobile ad hoc network where the topology may change frequently. The main prerequisite for position-based routing is that a sender can obtain the current position of the destination. Therefore, previously proposed location services are discussed in addition to position-based packet forwarding strategies. We provide a qualitative comparison of the approaches in both areas and investigate opportunities for future research. View full abstract»

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  • MPEG-4 and H.263 video traces for network performance evaluation

    Page(s): 40 - 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4379 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    MPEG-4 and H.263 encoded video is expected to account for a large portion of the traffic in future wireline and wireless networks. However, due to a lack of sufficiently long frame size traces of MPEG-4 and H.263 encoded videos, most network performance evaluations currently use MPEG-1 encodings. We present and study a publicly available library of frame size traces of long MPEG-4 and H.263 encoded videos, which we have generated at the Technical University Berlin. The frame size traces have been generated from MPEG-4 and H.263 encodings of over 10 video sequences each 60 minutes long. We conduct a thorough statistical analysis of the traces View full abstract»

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  • Mobile IP-DECT internetworking architecture supporting IMT-2000 applications

    Page(s): 10 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1937 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Realistic realization and mass acceptance of mobile data services require networking architectures offering acceptable quality of service and attractive tariffs. A novel strategy for this goal is maximum integration of popular data networking standards and their infrastructure into wireless networks. This article discusses a Mobile IP-based network architecture to provide IP services in DECT to support IMT-2000 applications. DECT offers micromobility within multicell subnets, while Mobile IP supports macromobility between multicell subnets. Incorporating Mobile IP into the DECT handoff mechanism in this way extends DECT micromobility with IP macromobility. Also, utilizing fast, seamless DECT handoff management reduces Mobile IP handoff delay to circumvent TCP throughput degradation during handoff and reduce frequency of Mobile IP signaling over the ether to conserve spectral efficiency. This feature seamlessly unifies DECT with the global Internet. Seamless integration of DECT with the Internet is crucial due to the continuing phenomenal popularity of the Internet and wireless communications, and ubiquity of DECT systems. To achieve the above DECT/IP interworking efficiently, the architecture introduces a network entity called a DECT service switching point, which is an extended DECT central control fixed part. DECT network-level services are mapped onto those of the IETF integrated services architecture to maintain QoS provided by DECT in the backbone Internet. Mobile Resource Reservation Protocol, an extended RSVP tailored to mobile networking, is adopted to provide the needed signaling in IntServ. The proposed architecture preserves traditional non-IP based services such as PSTN voice View full abstract»

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  • An evaluation of the key design criteria to achieve high update rates in packet classifiers

    Page(s): 24 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (949 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The increased capacity of networks and nodes might enable us to keep pace with the growing traffic load, but the change of paradigm in IP networks towards a QoS-aware and multimedia-friendly infrastructure creates new bottlenecks in the communication path. An example of such a bottleneck is dynamic packet classification, which is fundamental to supporting any sort of QoS and value-added services. Typically, high update rates in packet classification designs have been sacrificed to achieve better search times or to reduce storage capacity requirements. By carefully analyzing current proposals, we unveil three previously neglected key design criteria for general classifiers to successfully achieve high update rates at wire speed: filter localization, nonstructural dependencies, and dynamic precomputation. We also analyze their impact in current algorithms View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo