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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Meeting medical terminology needs-the ontology-enhanced Medical Concept Mapper

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 261 - 270
    Cited by:  Papers (23)  |  Patents (32)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (137 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the development and testing of the Medical Concept Mapper, a tool designed to facilitate access to online medical information sources by providing users with appropriate medical search terms for their personal queries. Our system is valuable for patients whose knowledge of medical vocabularies is inadequate to find the desired information, and for medical experts who search for information outside their field of expertise. The Medical Concept Mapper maps synonyms and semantically related concepts to a user's query. The system is unique because it integrates our natural language processing tool, i.e., the Arizona (AZ) Noun Phraser, with human-created ontologies, the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and WordNet, and our computer generated Concept Space, into one system. Our unique contribution results from combining the UMLS Semantic Net with Concept Space in our deep semantic parsing (DSP) algorithm. This algorithm establishes a medical query con-text based on the UMLS Semantic Net, which allows Concept Space terms to be filtered so as to isolate related terms relevant to the query. We performed two user studies in which Medical Concept Mapper terms were compared against human experts' terms. We conclude that the AZ Noun Phraser is well suited to extract medical phrases from user queries, that WordNet is not well suited to provide strictly medical synonyms, that the UMLS Metathesaurus is well suited to provide medical synonyms, and that Concept Space is well suited to provide related medical terms, especially when these terms are limited by our DSP algorithm. View full abstract»

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  • Computer-aided prototype system for nose surgery

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 271 - 278
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Rhinoplasty, or surgery to reshape the nose, is one of the most common of all plastic-surgery procedures. Rhinoplasty can enhance a patient's appearance and self-confidence, may also correct a birth defect or injury, or help relieve some breathing problem. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional (3D) surgical simulation system, which can assist surgeons in planning rhinoplasty procedures. This system employs computer graphics and image-processing techniques for the simulation of a rhinoplasty. Although the presented algorithms themselves are not new, the proposed system exploits the new idea to apply 3D morphing for rhinoplasty, and simulation results are useful for the physicians. According to patients' expectation of what they would like their noses to look like, our system simulates expected results. Our tools provide quantitative measurements of a nose structure. Using these quantitative results, surgeons can arrange appropriate preoperative plans for patients. Finally, experimental results and experiences are reported to evaluate the usefulness of the proposed system. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling tumor growth and irradiation response in vitro-a combination of high-performance computing and Web-based technologies including VRML visualization

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 279 - 289
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (331 KB)  

    A simplified three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation model of in vitro tumor growth and response to fractionated radiotherapeutic schemes is presented in this paper. The paper aims at both the optimization of radiotherapy and the provision of insight into the biological mechanisms involved in tumor development. The basics of the modeling philosophy of Duechting (1968, 1981, 1992, 1995) have been adopted and substantially extended. The main processes taken into account by the model are the transitions between the cell cycle phases, the diffusion of oxygen and glucose, and the cell survival probabilities following irradiation. Specific algorithms satisfactorily describing tumor expansion and shrinkage have been applied, whereas a novel approach to the modeling of the tumor response to irradiation has been proposed and implemented. High-performance computing systems in conjunction with Web technologies have coped with the particularly high computer memory and processing demands. A visualization system based on the MATLAB software package and the virtual-reality modeling language has been employed. Its utilization has led to a spectacular representation of both the external surface and the internal structure of the developing tumor. The simulation model has been applied to the special case of small cell lung carcinoma in vitro irradiated according to both the standard and accelerated fractionation schemes. A good qualitative agreement with laboratory experience has been observed in all cases. Accordingly, the hypothesis that advanced simulation models for the in silico testing of tumor irradiation schemes could substantially enhance the radiotherapy optimization process is further strengthened. Currently, our group is investigating extensions of the presented algorithms so that efficient descriptions of the corresponding clinical (in vivo) cases are achieved. View full abstract»

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  • ECG data compression using truncated singular value decomposition

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 290 - 299
    Cited by:  Papers (32)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (261 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The method of truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) is proposed for electrocardiogram (ECG) data compression. The signal decomposition capability of SVD is exploited to extract the significant feature components of the ECG by decomposing the ECG into a set of basic patterns with associated scaling factors. The signal information is mostly concentrated within a certain number of singular values with related singular vectors due to the strong interbeat correlation among ECG cycles. Therefore, only the relevant parts of the singular triplets need to be retained as the compressed data for retrieving the original signals. The insignificant overhead can be truncated to eliminate the redundancy of ECG data compression. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Beth Israel Hospital arrhythmia database was applied to evaluate the compression performance and recoverability in the retrieved ECG signals. The approximate achievement was presented with an average data rate of 143.2 b/s with a relatively low reconstructed error. These results showed that the truncated SVD method can provide efficient coding with high-compression ratios. The computational efficiency of the SVD method in comparing with other techniques demonstrated the method as an effective technique for ECG data storage or signals transmission. View full abstract»

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  • Wavelet-based space-frequency compression of ultrasound images

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 300 - 310
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (197 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the compression of grayscale medical ultrasound images using a recent compression technique, i.e., space-frequency segmentation (SITS). This method finds the rate-distortion optimal representation of an image from a large set of possible space-frequency partitions and quantizer combinations and is especially effective when the images to code are statistically inhomogeneous, which is the case for medical ultrasound images. We implemented a compression application based on this method and tested the algorithm on representative ultrasound images. The result is an effective technique that performs better than a leading wavelet-transform coding algorithm, i.e., set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT), using standard objective distortion measures. To determine the subjective qualitative performance, an expert viewer study was run by presenting ultrasound radiologists with images compressed using both SFS and SPIHT. The results confirmed the objective performance rankings. Finally, the performance sensitivity of the space-frequency codec is shown with respect to several parameters, and the characteristic space-frequency partitions found for ultrasound images are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • A computer-based method for the assessment of body-image distortions in anorexia-nervosa patients

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 311 - 319
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (174 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A computer-based method for the assessment of body-image distortions in anorexia nervosa and other eating-disorder patients is presented in this paper. At the core of the method is a realistic pictorial simulation of lifelike weight changes, applied to a real source image of the patient. The patients, using a graphical user interface, adjust their body shapes until they meet their self-perceived appearance. Measuring the extent of virtual fattening or slimming of a body with respect to its real shape and size allows direct quantitative evaluation of the cognitive distortion in body image. In a preliminary experiment involving 33 anorexia-nervosa patients, 70% of the subjects chose an image with simulated visual weight gain between 8%-16% as their "real" body image, while only one of them recognized the original body image. In a second experiment involving 30 healthy participants, the quality of the weight modified images was evaluated by pairwise selection trials. Over a weight change range from -16% to +28%, in about 30% of the trials, artificially modified images were mistakenly taken as "original" images, thus demonstrating the quality of the artificial images. The method presented is currently in a clinical validation phase, toward application in the research, diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of eating disorders. View full abstract»

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  • Compact storage of medical images with patient information

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 320 - 323
    Cited by:  Papers (26)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Digital watermarking is a technique of hiding specific identification data for copyright authentication. This technique is adapted here for interleaving patient information with medical images to reduce storage and transmission overheads. The text data are encrypted before interleaving with images to ensure greater security. The graphical signals are compressed and subsequently interleaved with the image. Differential pulse-code-modulation and adaptive-delta-modulation techniques are employed for data compression, and encryption and results are tabulated for a specific example. View full abstract»

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  • 2001 index IEEE Transactions on information technology in biomedicine vol. 5

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 324 - 325
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (47 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2001 index IEEE Transactions on information technology in biomedicine vol. 5 [Subject Index]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 325 - 331
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (71 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
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Fax:+852 2609-5558