By Topic

Software, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2001

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Raising your software consciousness

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 7 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (86 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reports from the field - using extreme programming and other experiences

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 17 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (519 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web user interface design, forgotten lessons

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 69 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (70 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A number of prescriptions are in vogue for designing Web user interfaces, but Web site usability continues to be a serious issue. In comparison, the usability of traditional GUI applications is a couple of notches better. The key difference is in the design methods used. The author argues that improving Web design methods is possible by learning from the GUI design approach. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Privacy, security concerns take on new meaning

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 102 - 104
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (69 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • DMCA "fixes" delayed - court cases, legislative amendment efforts take back seat to terrorism response

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 104 - 105
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (97 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Articles Index

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 106 - 108
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (538 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Authors index

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 108 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (574 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Extreme programming: the good, the bad, and the bottom line

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 112 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (79 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applying formal specifications to real-world software development

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 89 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (117 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    While formal methods are gaining acceptance in the software industry, there is a need for practical guidelines for making the best use of formal specifications. The author provides a few such pragmatic tips for people involved in the industrial use of formal specifications. The 15 guidelines are split into two areas, dealing with process and content. The author also includes a full-page reference for literature available over the Web View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • To be explicit [software design]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 10 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB)  

    Software is an odd medium in which to construct something. Because few physical forces make you design one way or another, many design decisions sadly resist any form of objective analysis. Where design counts is often not in how the software runs but in how easy it is to change. When how it runs is important, ease of change can be the biggest factor in ensuring good performance. This drive toward changeability is why it's so important for a design to clearly show what the program does-and how it does it. After all, it's hard to change something when you can't see what it does. An interesting corollary of this is that people often use specific designs because they are easy to change, but when they make the program difficult to understand, the effect is the reverse of what was intended View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recovery, redemption, and extreme programming

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 34 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author retells a downtrodden project's attempt to rejuvenate itself by doing extreme programming, discussing successes, shortcomings, and, ultimately, lessons learned. In particular, the author credits the team's composition for its ultimate success. Although XP wasn't the team's immediate salvation, it made the application sustainable past the project's deadline View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Implementing a software metrics program at Nokia

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 72 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (143 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Model solutions for implementing a measurement program do not always fit an organization without tailoring. The sizes and maturities of the processes vary from organization to organization. In an organization with mature software processes, carefully adjusting the created solution for a measurement program to the environment-specific needs and options can save considerable effort. The article demonstrates the real-world application of the Nokiaway software metrics program and how it benefited in its divergence from a typical goal-question-metric approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using extreme programming in a maintenance environment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 42 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In response to problems experienced by the Orbix Generation 3 maintenance and enhancement team, Iona Technologies tried to introduce industry-level best practices by adopting extreme programming. The issues discussed are common for companies moving from startup mode to those supporting numerous customers in need of bug fixes and application enhancements for existing deployment scenarios View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Extreme programming from a CMM perspective

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 19 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (39)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Extreme programming has been advocated recently as an appropriate programming method for the high-speed, volatile world of Internet and Web software development. The author reviews XP from the perspective of the capability maturity model for software, gives overviews of both approaches, and critiques XP from a SW-CMM perspective. He concludes that lightweight methodologies such as XP advocate many good engineering practices and that both perspectives have something to offer the other View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Russian software industry

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 98 - 101
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (77 KB)  

    Russia is a vast territory with seemingly endless natural resources. Indeed, gas, oil, coal, and lumber still constitute by far the largest part of Russian national produce, accounting for over 80 percent of exports. It is easy to overlook the software industry against this background, yet it is one of Russia's promising industries. Russia also has one of the largest pools of technical specialists in the world-a 1997 World Bank/UNESCO study stated that more than one million people are involved in research and development. The author provides a history of programming in Russia, an overview of Russian software companies, and problems and perspectives View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cracking the 500-language problem

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 78 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Constructing analysis and modification tools for software assets is laborious because you first need to implement the underlying parser for the software's specific programming language. These implementations are generally not in the public domain. So, parser development for any of the 500+ languages in use today implies a major up-front investment. The authors propose a solution that will work for virtually all languages: the rapid development of renovation parsers by stealing the grammars. They also share lessons learned View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Survival patterns in fast-moving software

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 51 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To survive, fast-moving software organizations must respond quickly to changing market needs and technological options as well as deliver high-quality products and services at competitive prices. They must therefore constantly improve their capabilities. The authors learned important lessons on how to deal effectively with the dilemmas and opportunities involved in such a goal View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Launching extreme programming at a process-intensive company

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 27 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (105 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author describes a project that was started using many extreme programming practices in a company that has a traditional formal development process. He discusses how XP was proposed to management, how the project seed was started and grown, what the team faced during its first six months, and what worked View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Knowledge management, insights from the trenches

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 66 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (117 KB)  

    In 1999, the Software Productivity Consortium-a not-for-profit alliance of industry, government, and academia-asked our members to indicate which technological advances they need most urgently. Most respondents stressed the need to better leverage an increasingly vast and complex array of intellectual assets. Such assets represent today's new capital, marking a profound shift from more traditional types of capital. To address this urgent need, the Consortium launched a knowledge management (KM) program to develop our competency in knowledge management so that we can better serve our members and to provide products and services that will help members develop their own KM competencies. We focused first on making access to Consortium assets easier through an enterprise portal. Then, to address the larger KM issues, we also partnered with George Washington University and its new Institute for Knowledge Management, which seeks to establish a sound theoretical foundation for KM. Here, we recap the lessons we have learned in pursuing our KM mandate and set forth what we believe are the keys to KM's future success View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software architecture correctness

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 64 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (83 KB)  

    Software quality stems from many factors, including implementation decisions, software architecture, and requirements. We focus on software architecture, which can enable or inhibit many of a software system's qualities. Because the cost of addressing quality concerns is a function of how late you address them (the later, the more costly), addressing them in the architectural or requirements phase makes sense View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The top risk of requirements engineering

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 62 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (46 KB)  

    The worst thing that can happen in requirements engineering is that your set of requirements, however expressed, doesn't accurately represent your users' needs and consequently leads your team down the wrong development path. The whole point of requirements engineering is to steer your development toward producing the right software. If you don't get the requirements right, how well you execute the rest of the project doesn't matter because it will fail. The article looks at how we can be led astray View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Accelerating learning from experience: avoiding defects faster

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 56 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (99 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    All programmers learn from experience. A few are rather fast at it and learn to avoid repeating mistakes after once or twice. Others are slower and repeat mistakes hundreds of times. Most programmers' behavior falls somewhere in between: They reliably learn from their mistakes, but the process is slow and tedious. The probability of making a structurally similar mistake again decreases slightly during each of some dozen repetitions. Because of this a programmer often takes years to learn a certain rule-positive or negative-about his or her behavior. As a result, programmers might turn to the personal software process (PSP) to help decrease mistakes. We show how to accelerate this process of learning from mistakes for an individual programmer, no matter whether learning is currently fast, slow, or very slow, through defect logging and defect data analysis (DLDA) techniques View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
Athina 104 33, Greece
dds@computer.org