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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
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  • Mixed reality: future dreams seen at the border between real and virtual worlds

    Page(s): 64 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1412 KB)  

    Mixed reality (MR) is a kind of virtual reality (VR) but a broader concept than augmented reality (AR), which augments the real world with synthetic electronic data. On the opposite side, there is a term, augmented virtuality (AV), which enhances or augments the virtual environment (VE) with data from the real world. Mixed reality covers a continuum from AR to AV. This concept embraces the definition of MR stated by Milgram and Kishino (1994). We describe some technical achievements we made in the Mixed Reality Project in Japan View full abstract»

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  • Graphics in computational paleontology

    Page(s): 6 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1877 KB)  

    It makes sense that humans-with their forward-facing eyes-would understand the patterns of the world through sight rather than sound. The form of creatures long past, their evolution and growth, even the development of our own form as we grow in life are mysteries to us today. But, buried in the past are keys to unlocking our understanding of form. We may still use tools such as picks and shovels to uncover them, but today paleontologists are also using computers and graphics to dig into the past. Sometimes the discovery of something new helps us unlock mysteries of the distant past, and sometimes discovering something about the distant past unlocks a mystery of today View full abstract»

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  • The Virtual Showcase

    Page(s): 48 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1137 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We introduce a new projection-based AR display system-the Virtual Showcase. The Virtual Showcase has the same form factor as a real showcase, making it compatible with traditional museum displays. Real scientific and cultural artifacts are placed inside the Virtual Showcase allowing their 3D graphical augmentation. Inside the Virtual Showcase, virtual representations and real artifacts share the same space providing new ways of merging and exploring real and virtual content. Solely virtual exhibits may also be displayed. The virtual part of the showcase can react in various ways to a visitor, which provides the possibility for intuitive interaction with the displayed content View full abstract»

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  • Interface with angels: the future of VIR and AR interfaces

    Page(s): 14 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (423 KB)  

    Although real guardian angels aren't easy to get hold of, some of the computer technology needed for such a personal assistant is already available. Other parts exist in the form of research prototypes, but some technological breakthroughs are necessary before we can realize their potential, let alone integrate into our daily routines. Future VR and AR interfaces won't necessarily try to provide a perfect imitation of reality but instead will adapt their display mechanisms to their users' individual requirements. The emergence of these interfaces won't rely on a single technology but will depend on the advances in many areas, including computer graphics, display technology, tracking and recognition devices, natural and intuitive interactions, 3D interaction techniques, mobile and ubiquitous computing, intelligent agents, and conversational user interfaces, to name a few. The guardian angel scenario exemplifies how future developments in AR and VR user interfaces might change the way we interact with computers. Although this example is just one of several plausible scenarios, it demonstrates that AR and VP, in combination with user-centered design of their post-WIMP interfaces, can provide increased access, convenience, usability, and efficiency View full abstract»

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  • Treating psychological and phsyical disorders with VR

    Page(s): 25 - 33
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    We present some applications that therapists have used with patients. Treating psychological disorders is one aspect of a larger application area of VR that we refer to as clinical virtual reality-the direct use of VR as a tool in treating or assessing psychological and physical disorders. Examples of clinical applications that use VR include treatment of phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam War veterans, eating disorders, pain distraction; and physical (stroke and orthopedic) rehabilitation. This article offers some general ideas on how clinical VR applications fundamentally differ from many other VR applications and presents three detailed examples of current clinical VR applications that have moved from the demonstration phase to actual use with patients in a clinical setting View full abstract»

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  • Quantum computing. 3

    Page(s): 72 - 82
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    For part 2, see ibid., September/October (2001). Every now and then surprising new theories appear on the scientific stage that hold the promise of dramatic new technologies. Quantum computing is one of these. The ideas in this field radically change the way we think about computers and computing. in my last two columns, I introduced the theory of quantum computing and presented its basic terminology and notation. In this installment, I wrap up my discussion of the subject by presenting some interesting quantum algorithms and then showing how quantum computing can change the world of cryptography, or the sharing of secrets View full abstract»

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  • Surface acoustic wave tactile display

    Page(s): 56 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB)  

    Developing realistic tactile displays for virtual reality has been challenging. Tangible displays are increasingly important interfaces not only for augmenting the reality of computer graphics but also for conveying graphical information to persons with visual impairments. We propose a tactile display using surface a acoustic waves. We can continuously change the fineness of the surface's grain by controlling the SAWs' burst frequency View full abstract»

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  • Today's VR

    Page(s): 22 - 24
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    Virtual reality (VR) has advanced since the early 1990s. We review current VR and augmented reality systems and technology, point out new solutions, and suggest ideas for future research View full abstract»

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  • Minimal graphics

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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    Photorealistic rendering of graphical models continues to be a topic of considerable research effort in the computer graphics community. However, photorealism isn't the only criterion for judging an image's value. In visualization, where rendering is the conduit through which abstract, nonrealistic forms (such as isosurfaces or streamtubes) become perceivable to users, photorealism may neither be the most useful nor appropriate property. This article describes our long-term research vision in an area that, in our view, should gain a lot of importance in the future View full abstract»

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  • Recent advances in augmented reality

    Page(s): 34 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2281 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In 1997, Azuma published a survey on augmented reality (AR). Our goal is to complement, rather than replace, the original survey by presenting representative examples of the new advances. We refer one to the original survey for descriptions of potential applications (such as medical visualization, maintenance and repair of complex equipment, annotation, and path planning); summaries of AR system characteristics (such as the advantages and disadvantages of optical and video approaches to blending virtual and real, problems in display focus and contrast, and system portability); and an introduction to the crucial problem of registration, including sources of registration error and error-reduction strategies View full abstract»

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IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

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Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa