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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • A summary of telecommunications reform in china

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 35 - 37
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  • Costa Rican telecoms at the crossroads

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 36
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  • Report on 3Gwireless 2001

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 36
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A comparison of network operators in china

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 37 - 38
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  • Internet appliances

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 43 - 44
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  • Evolving communications software: techniques and technologies

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 86 - 87
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  • Topics in wireless communications

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 114
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  • Cellular network management goals and data-centric solutions

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 136 - 144
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    We elaborate on the management goals of next-generation cellular networks and describe how data-centric solutions can meet these goals. In a data-centric solution, operator applications act on a database representation of the cellular network. Network operations are invoked as a consequence to database changes, and the network, in turn, feeds the database with data such as network event notifications. The data-centric approach allows a focus on data as it is specified by the business needs of network management. This approach is augmented with data independence to assure consistent and flexible access of the data environment through the use of a common data interface. The data-centric design is contrasted with an application-centric design, and we conclude by providing suggestions on how application interface components can augment a data-centric network management solution View full abstract»

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  • A practical ADSL technology following a decade of effort

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 145 - 151
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This article offers a behind the scenes glimpse of a successful ADSL transceiver development, completed over the last decade while the ADSL standard evolved. It discusses the pitfalls experienced by designers and describes how a pragmatic and unconventional design solution was found View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating meta-programming mechanisms for ORB middleware

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 102 - 113
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distributed object computing middleware, such as CORBA, COM+, and Java RMI, shields developers from many tedious and error-prone aspects of programming distributed applications. It is hard to evolve distributed applications after they are deployed, however, without adequate middleware support for meta-programming mechanisms, such as smart proxies, interceptors, and pluggable protocols. These mechanisms can help improve the adaptability of distributed applications by allowing their behavior to be modified without changing their existing software designs and implementations significantly. This article examines and compares common meta-programming mechanisms supported by DOC middleware. These mechanisms allow applications to adapt more readily to changes in requirements and runtime environments throughout their lifecycles. Some of these meta-programming mechanisms are relatively new, whereas others have existed for decades. This article provides a systematic evaluation of these mechanisms to help researchers and developers determine which are best suited to their application needs View full abstract»

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  • Internet facsimile as an Internet office appliance

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 60 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    The Internet's emergence as a worldwide digital infrastructure has dramatically encouraged a market for communications-oriented appliances, such as mobile phones, personal assistants, network-enabled games, interactive television, Internet telephony, and Internet facsimile. The marketplace is developing rapidly, along with specialized Internet-based “linking” services to connect these devices. Generally two different technical approaches are being explored for these services. One uses classic Internet technology, such as e-mail or the World Wide Web; the other incorporates unique standards, often derived from earlier non-Internet specifications. This article explores efforts to create Internet facsimile appliances, contrasting them with devices for Internet telephony. Efforts at Internet facsimile have produced two different sets of standards. Store-and-forward Internet facsimile is specialized as a profile of classic Internet mail. Real-time Internet facsimile uses a specialized protocol View full abstract»

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  • A protocol for wide area secure networked appliance communication

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1072 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article describes problems associated with remotely accessing networked appliances (e.g., from the Internet). Networked appliances are widely viewed as the “next wave” of devices on the Internet. We discuss some possible uses for networked appliances and the requirements for communicating with them. We present details of a solution to meet these communication requirements based on the IETF Session Initiation Protocol. In addition, we discuss the rationale for our approach and reasons other approaches were not adopted. An example of the use of the SIP in this domain is presented to illustrate how the solution can be used. We conclude with outstanding challenges and reiterate advantages of this approach View full abstract»

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  • Radio access selection for multistandard terminals

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 116 - 124
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (3)
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    The race for higher data rates in wireless systems has produced a multiplicity of radio access methods to fulfill the quality of service needs for the next generation of mobile devices. This document presents an analysis of GERAN, UTRAN, WLAN, and Bluetooth as possible methods of accessing services via a wireless device. In light of the results, meaningful combinations for radio access methods of wireless devices are elaborated View full abstract»

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  • A multicarrier CDMA architecture based on orthogonal complementary codes for new generations of wideband wireless communications

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 126 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (86)  |  Patents (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2656 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article is a review of our ongoing research effort to construct a new multicarrier CDMA architecture based on orthogonal complete complementary codes, characterized by its innovative spreading modulation scheme, uplink and downlink signaling design, and digital receiver implementation for multipath signal detection. There are several advantages of the proposed CDMA architecture compared to conventional CDMA systems pertinent to current 2G and 3G standards. First of all, it can achieve a spreading efficiency (SE) very close to one (the SE is defined as the amount of information bit(s) conveyed by each chip); whereas SEs of conventional CDMA systems equal 1/N, where N denotes the length of spreading codes. Second, it offers MAI-free operation in both upand downlink transmissions in an MAI-AWGN channel, which can significantly reduce the co-channel interference responsible for capacity decline of a CDMA system. Third, the proposed CDMA architecture is able to offer a high bandwidth efficiency due to the use of its unique spreading modulation scheme and orthogonal carriers. Lastly, the proposed CDMA architecture is particularly suited to multirate signal transmission due to the use of an offset stacked spreading modulation scheme, which simplifies the rate-matching algorithm relevant to multimedia services and facilitates asymmetric traffic in up- and downlink transmissions for IP-based applications. Based on the above characteristics and the obtained results, it is concluded that the proposed CDMA architecture has a great potential for applications in future wideband mobile communications beyond 3G, which is expected to offer a very high data rate in hostile mobile channels View full abstract»

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  • A scenario based approach to the evolution of telecommunications software

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 94 - 100
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Significant amounts of legacy software create a “barrier” to the adoption of advanced software engineering techniques in the telecommunications industry. To overcome this barrier, algorithms, methods, and powerful tools for automated extraction of formal models of the legacy telecommunication software are required. In this article we present a “scenario-based” approach to design recovery and evolution of legacy telecommunication software into formal models. Our approach is iterative and is based on extracting scenarios from the legacy software using a combination of dynamic and static strategies, and automatically synthesizing formal models from these scenarios. For the first step we use the KLOCwork Suite, which is capable of providing summarized structural, functional, and scenario models of existing software. For the second step we use the MOST Suite, which is capable of synthesizing state-based formal models from scenarios, formalized as extended message sequence charts. The article provides a detailed description of our design recovery methodology and compares it with related approaches. A case study is discussed where our scenario-based methodology is applied to recover the design of a small-sized telecommunications-like software system called the ToolExchange View full abstract»

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  • Do appliances threaten Internet innovation?

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 46 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The world is evolving from one in which almost all access to the Internet comes through personal computers, to one in which so-called Internet appliances are expected to make up a growing share of end user equipment. Focusing on consumer-oriented appliances, we consider whether this shift has implications for the pace of Internet innovation. We conclude that given the starting point of the current Internet, certain of the proposed business models for Internet appliances are not likely to be viable, and this very fact protects the Internet's characteristically rapid pace of innovation View full abstract»

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  • Refactoring for software migration

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 88 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Refactoring can be an important ingredient in the strategy for development and evolution of complex telecommunications software systems. Refactoring is one way to reuse and extend a successful software system. This article presents some design tactics that will assist a development team when they choose evolution from an existing software system over building a completely new system from the ground up. Strictly speaking, the refactoring process changes only the internal design of the software. Refactoring does not add any new functionality. However, the goal of refactoring work is to pave the way for the software to be modified and extended more easily. The simplest example of redesign is the creation of simple “wrapper classes” that contain groups of functions extracted from the legacy code. More complex design patterns are also useful when attempting to improve the design. Developers usually divide the redesign work into stages so that each stage can be implemented and tested separately. This article describes a real-world example of this approach that shows how refactoring improved the design of a wireless base station controller product View full abstract»

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  • Networked appliances and their peer-to-peer architecture AMIDEN

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 80 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (904 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To connect appliances directly to each other and to let them cooperate with each other, a standard architecture for appliance networking is indispensable. Appliances with networking capabilities are called networked appliances. A networked appliance architecture called AMIDEN is being developed to realize networked appliances. AMIDEN is a peer-to-peer architecture that enables appliance networking and direct appliance interworking without a network server such as a PC. Using AMIDEN a digital still camera and a printer can form a network and cooperate with each other. The design philosophy and architecture of AMIDEN are discussed in detail View full abstract»

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  • Providing network connectivity for small appliances: a functionally minimized embedded Web server

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 74 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There is a strong trend toward embedding Internet capabilities into electronics and everyday appliances. We introduce the results from a research project where we have been working toward implementing a functionally minimized Web server on silicon. Although most embedded Internet appliances will use a microcontroller and software to enable TCP/IP and HTTP support, we argue that there are many applications where a hardware-based approach is more suitable. Our WebChip approach is a family of IPv6-compatible solutions toward the realization of embedded and minimized Web systems. The core parts of the implementation are a C-code library and VHDL code implementation. The solution is tested with an FPGA and can be later embedded into various ASIC chips. We argue that this approach is also commercially viable since the VHDL code can be delivered as an intellectual property block View full abstract»

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  • Secure remote access from office to home

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 68 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When accessing IP-ready appliances at home from a remote site, security is a major concern. We address the seemingly common scenario of accessing IP-ready appliances behind a home firewall from a remote PC within a corporate intranet. The scenario reveals the complex nature of secure remote access. Various IP tunneling technologies can provide secure remote access without sacrificing the ubiquitous accessibility of the Internet; however, the problem of multiple authentication processes is evident in the framework. Digital certificate technology can simplify the authentication process required to establish multiple IP tunnels. However, IP tunneling technologies do not scale well, and become infeasible if the number of firewalls to traverse increases. Scalability and end-to-end security requirements call for the deployment of authenticated firewall traversal methods that use minimal or no IP tunnels. This article describes a meet-in-the-middle network model as a simple and practical method View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies