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Instrumentation & Measurement Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Microsystems and I&M - mutual interest, demonstrated impact, and potential [Guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 6
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrated silicon microspectrometers

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 34 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3075 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Microspectrometers, which read color and the results from analytical chemistry, are used for quality inspection in industry and agriculture. They read the chromatography results by measuring the IR absorption of the chemical constituent between the IR source and the grating. Micromachining can implement the dispersion and detection elements in a silicon microspectrometer so that it can analyze the spectrum of incident light. The microspectrometer may either operate an array of detectors, each with a uniform spectral response, or scan the dispersion element using a single calibrated detector. Compared to bulky macroscopic devices, this microspectrometer has inferior spectral resolution but its small size and low cost more than compensates for this limitation in many applications. View full abstract»

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  • Java as a teaching tool

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 42
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  • Java as a teaching tool

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 46
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  • IEEE instrumentation and measurement society awards

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 59
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Opportunities for microtechnology in metrology

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 24 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (728 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The vast infrastructure of the microelectronic and microtechnological processing industry has yielded highly reproducible devices through reliable, reproducible, and fabrication-compatible processing techniques. Much development has occurred in bulk and surface micromachining, as well as in thin-film deposition techniques. Nevertheless, only a limited number of metrological applications have benefited from the use of this technology. Only two metrological applications that use microtechnology have been developed into commercially available devices: the JJA, as a DC reference, and the thermal RMS-to-DC converter, as an AC reference. Single electron tunneling devices and micromachined electrostatic RMS-to-DC converters are still under development. The accuracy requirements of the existing applications will continue to increase. This makes the development of on-chip references and on-chip self-test and self-calibration facilities essential. These microelectronic features, until now have remained unexploited in metrology, as well as in most other applications View full abstract»

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  • Gyroscopes

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 49 - 52
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    I describe the path that I took to develop a gyroscope-balancing machine, the principles of which still apply today. The nature of the design and development challenge is summarised. Allowable drift tolerances, measurement implementation and imbalance correction techniques, governed by what was practically achievable, became the performance requirements for the gyroscope balancing machine View full abstract»

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  • Measuring radiation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 47 - 48
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    The author discusses his favourite experiment conducted during his youth which comprised detecting alpha radiation with a spinthariscope. He also describes how one can construct such an instrument nowadays View full abstract»

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  • Giving meaning to measurement

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 41 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
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    Measurement provides the transformation that represents the relationship between one domain and another. Measurement in isolation is meaningless. It must fit into the understanding of a system, which has relational, interacting components. Measurement always has a reference from which it establishes a relationship between domains. We have a colloquial expression in America, “Don't miss the forest for the trees.” It means that by focusing on the details, we tend to overlook the big picture. Sometimes scientists and engineers can see the details but miss the overall perspective. This does not have to be. We can overcome this failing and thereby build more useful instruments. We need to understand who uses measurement, why we measure, and how we measure. Upon this basis we can use basic principles of human interactions to construct better, more useful instruments. You might call these basic principles ergonomics, user interface, human factors; I would call it common sense View full abstract»

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  • Microtechnology and microsystems in measurement applications

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 21 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Microtechnology has made inroads into metrology. MEMS structures in thermal RMS-to-DC conversion are at a mature stage. Many more applications are in their infancy and require more basic and applied research. Next to metrology, these may open doors to the higher performance instruments. A characteristic of MEMS is the reproducibility of the structure, which is important in metrology. Standard microelectronic processing and low-cost batch fabrication, which are often the main driving force in other applications areas, are less important in metrology because of the modest production volumes. Compatibility becomes an important issue when one tries to implement a reference element in a microsystem View full abstract»

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  • Packaging of microsystems for harsh environments

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 30 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Micromachined devices have great potential but using these fragile structures in aggressive environments can pose a challenge. Mechanical shock, chemical exposure, and temperature extremes can damage delicate microsystems. Also, substantial effort is often put forth to develop a device concept only to find later that the device is difficult or expensive to package suitably in a consumer or automotive environment. The cost of materials, processing, and manufacturing make the sensor or actuator device impractical for some applications. A successful MEMS device manages the proper balance for its application between the high device performance and low unit cost. The packaging of MEMS begins with a consideration of the microsystem's environment. An aerospace, automotive, or industrial component could be subjected to temperatures ranging from -40°C to over 150°C. Mechanical shocks in the 10 g to +500 g range can be experienced which can fracture poorly designed silicon beams. Chemical exposure, which can corrode silicon, or the metal interconnection lines on silicon, and shift electrical parameters, are challenges that must be overcome in these applications View full abstract»

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  • Molecular nanotechnology

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 11 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6720 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Molecular nanotechnology is an interdisciplinary field combining the sciences of molecular chemistry and physics with the engineering principles of mechanical design, structural analysis, computer science, electrical engineering, and systems engineering. Molecular manufacturing is a method conceived for the processing and rearrangement of atoms to fabricate custom products. It relies on the use of a large number of molecular robotic subsystems working in parallel and using commonly available chemicals. Built to atomic specification, the products would exhibit order-of-magnitude improvements in strength, toughness, speed, and efficiency, and be of high quality and low cost. This article provides an overview of molecular nanotechnology, reviews progress in the field since its origins, and outlines the implications of its eventual emergence as the dominant manufacturing technique of the 21st century View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement Magazine contains applications-oriented and tutorial articles on topics in the broadly based areas of instrumentation system design and measurement techniques.

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Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Wendy Van Moer

wendy.w.vanmoer@ieee.org
IandMMagazineEIC@ieee.org