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Industry Applications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept.-Oct. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • The IEEE brown book [Book Review]

    Page(s): 9 - 10
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reliability program for plant maintenance

    Page(s): 29 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the increased emphasis on cost containment and reduction, the reliability of equipment has become an area of great concern. Many managers now see reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) as a method of gaining an advantage over the competition. What does reliability entail, and how can a RCM process be implemented? This article defines what a reliability process involves and illustrates how a reliability process was implemented at the Catawba, SC, USA, site of the Bowater Coated Paper Division. Both the successes and the growing pains experienced are discussed with thoughts on how the implementation could have gone smoother. The greatest benefits gained from the process are mentioned and plans for where to carry the process in the future are explored. The benefits of a successfully implemented reliability program have already been proven. In several process industries, such as refining and petrochemicals, reliability has been used to reduce maintenance budgets by up to 50% View full abstract»

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  • David C. Prince-engineer, researcher, inventor

    Page(s): 12 - 19
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    David Chandler Prince influenced electrical switchgear design in a way paralleled by few other engineers. He made decisions and took actions that changed forever the way power engineers design and apply switchgear. His contributions continue to influence this work. Prior to 1925, switching technologies were mostly an empirical art based on hydraulic conceptions of arc interruption. By 1935, art evolved into science based on an electronic or plasma view of electric arc behavior. Prince led the way as engineers worldwide extended switchgear technologies from bulk oil and air magnetic to new frontiers of vacuum, minimum oil, oil blast, and air blast. In addition, he wrote one of the first textbooks on mercury-are rectifiers and coined the term “inverter”, so commonly used today. Prince was president of the AIEE in 1941 and recipient of the Lamme Medal in 1945. But the single greatest contribution for which he should be remembered was design of oil-impulse circuit breakers for Hoover (Boulder) Dam. His new technology was much more efficient in its use of materials; the new designs required only one-tenth as much oil as the older bulk-oil technology required. Today, few practising engineers recognize his name or know of his contributions. So, if he made so many contributions, why don't we recognize his name? Has he simply been forgotten? This article explores this and other interesting aspects of David Prince and his technology View full abstract»

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  • Cold-weather effects on Class I hazardous electrical installations

    Page(s): 33 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With electrical hazardous area installations in different climates around the world, it is increasingly difficult to test products for all temperature extremes. When standard testing for Class I explosion-proof equipment generally covers the temperature range of +40 to -25°C (104 to -13°F), how do you design for climates which may encounter much lower temperatures? In cold climate areas such as Alaska, Northern Canada, and Siberia, temperatures as low as -50 to -70°C (-58 to -94°F) may be encountered. Engineers are faced with making choices in specifying equipment for these areas with much greater extremes in ambient temperature conditions than standard testing accounts for, how do we ensure that the equipment will meet the intent of the standards involved? Some low-temperature testing has been done to determine the effect of low temperatures on explosion-proof equipment. However, there has not been sufficient work done to develop factors to predict performance at low temperatures that can be applied to normal temperature test results. Designers applying equipment in low-temperature applications will find it difficult to find complete information on low-temperature test results to assist them in applying equipment at temperatures below -25°C (-13°F) View full abstract»

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  • Optimizing capital costs in power-distribution upgrades

    Page(s): 41 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As capacity improvements in North American paper mills are on the increase, so too is the need to increase source megavoltamperes and interrupting ratings of main power-distribution switchgear. In addition, today's energy crisis will be resolved in part by new generation, some installed onsite at North American paper mills. This combination of higher source megavoltamperes and increased capacity will result in overdutied power-distribution equipment in existing mills. Engineers will continue to be faced with the decision of upgrade or replace existing switchgear. Although the lure of purchasing and installing new equipment is compelling, it can often be the worse possible choice in terms of lost production and mill profitability. Although not all vintage switchgear is created equal, there are several ways to extend the operational life of existing equipment with retrofit or replacement breakers. Mill engineering and management should investigate available switchgear upgrade alternatives carefully before electing to dispose of existing equipment and replace it with new View full abstract»

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  • Industrial speed control: are PM couplings an alternative to VFDs?

    Page(s): 57 - 63
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    For industrial applications, the primary consideration of any component or system is reliability. In this aspect, the variable frequency drive (VFD) is now generally regarded as a mature technology of proven track record in a multitude of diverse applications. The adjustable speed coupling system (ASCS), as a newer technology, needs to develop a comparable reputation which, if the mechanical concepts are sound, should be possible as it has a much smaller parts count and is simpler. Maintenance requirements are also small-two bearings requiring periodic lubrication View full abstract»

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  • Reducing the effects of lightning in cogeneration plants

    Page(s): 20 - 28
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    Georgia Transmission Corporation (GTC) serves the Weyerbaeuser Flint River Mill in Oglethorpe, GA, with a new, nondedicated 115 kV radial-transmission line connecting from the North Americus substation with a tap to the South Oglethorpe substation. The Flint River mill is a cogenerator with a single 46.6 MVA steam-turbine generator fueled by biomass. The line suffered from repeated outages, primarily due to lightning strikes, since the day it was commissioned. As a result, increased attention and concern has been given to the problems associated with resultant voltage fluctuations and momentary outages in the mill. More effort has been placed on service reliability and tracking these fluctuations and outages. Several lightning engineering programs have been studied. In particular, the Windows-based Lightning-Protection Design Workstation, developed by EPRI, was investigated. The program was used to provide a comparison of pole-line configuration, arrester usage, and static protection as would relate to power outages. It calculates the lightning performances of overhead transmission lines and indicates what, if any, flashover design improvements are required to reduce iightning-caused outages. A further investigation involved the use of a computer-based scope with the ability to see storms over 483 km (300 mi) away. Early detection of storms with the potential to produce strikes on the mill site or the transmission line will allow the mill to take the necessary steps to operate independently from the electric utility company until the thunderstorm subsides View full abstract»

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  • Drive systems for high-speed gearless elevators

    Page(s): 52 - 56
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    The authors present a new standardized type of gearless traction machine drive system with a PM motor for high-speed elevators. Some control functions which are indispensable for improving the performance of elevator systems have been addressed. Stringent evaluation, environment and life tests ensure that the presented system is not only high-performance but long-lasting and more reliable View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Industry Applications Magazine reports on the development and application of electrical systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; the encouragement of energy conservation; and the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
H. Landis "Lanny" Floyd