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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date July-Aug. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Mixing audio and animation: contemporary synesthesia

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 4 - 5
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  • Speeding things up: bicycle racing uses computers before reaching the starting line

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 14 - 20
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  • Applied perception

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 20 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Color and brightness appearance issues in tiled displays

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 58 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Large-format displays created by tiling multiple, projected images have been used for decades in flight simulators and entertainment and are commercially available in a variety of forms. More recently, various research organizations have built custom display walls out of commodity projectors to support research in visualization, large-format display, and interaction. In these settings, making the display appear as a single, seamless surface has proven challenging. Where tiles overlap, they create bright seams. The tiles vary in color and brightness, not only from tile to tile, but within each tile. Each projector has a slightly different color gamut, caused by variations in the bulb, color filters, and digital processing (contrast, brightness, and gamma) for the projector. The spatial variation in brightness has two causes. First, the light from a projection system doesn't uniformly illuminate the screen. Second, the light doesn't scatter uniformly out of the front of the screen, making the perceived brightness depend on the viewing angle. In some projectors, the projected light's color also varies across the tile's face, resulting in unwanted tints in the images. I describe what causes these variations and what can be done about them View full abstract»

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  • Perceptually optimized 3D graphics

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 68 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
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    The author uses models of visual perception to remove nonperceptible components of a 3D computer graphics scene and optimize the system's performance. He considers how much detail can be removed from the scene without the user noticing, and how much added benefit these optimizations actually bring View full abstract»

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  • Information availability in 2D and 3D displays

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 51 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Why are 3D displays good for rapidly appreciating the third dimension of scenes? We show that information availability is more important than the 3D display format. Participants engaged in visual search for the attributes of altitude and pitch for coding schemes. This design let us disentangle the display format and information coding scheme so that we could properly evaluate the effect of each on performance View full abstract»

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  • Visualizing the real world

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 6 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    What is visualization of the real world? In our view, it means visualizing the environments around us, at scales we're accustomed to, sensing what we would normally sense. Unlike others in the field of visualization, we don't aim to provide X-ray vision, heat or airflow models, or small-scale measurements (such as the inspection of parts to the nearest micron or determination of molecular structures by x-ray crystallography). And neither do we aim for larger-than-life views, such as those presented by geographic information systems of our world or the models of worlds beyond provided by astrophysicists. Instead, we focus on what humans currently sense, at scales that we navigate daily, to record and share experiences View full abstract»

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  • Using perceptual syntax to enhance semantic content in diagrams

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 76 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Diagrams are essential in documenting large information systems. They capture, communicate, and leverage knowledge indispensable for solving problems and act as cognitive externalizations (intertwining internal and external processes to extract information from the external world to enhance thought). A diagram provides a mapping from the problem domain to the visual representation by supporting cognitive processes that involve perceptual pattern finding and cognitive symbolic operations. However, not all mappings are equal, and for effectiveness we must embed a diagram's representation with characteristics, which lets users easily perceive meaningful patterns. Consequently, a diagram's effectiveness depends to some extent on how well we construct it as an input to our visual system. In our research, we focus on a class of diagrams commonly referred to as graphs or node-link diagrams. Nodes representing entities, objects, or processes, and links or edges representing relationships between the nodes characterize them. Their most common form is outline circles or boxes denoting nodes and lines of different types representing links between the nodes. Entity-relationship diagrams, software structure diagrams, and data-flow models are examples of node-link diagrams used to model the structure of processes, software, or data View full abstract»

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  • Color transfer between images

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 34 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (283)  |  Patents (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We use a simple statistical analysis to impose one image's color characteristics on another. We can achieve color correction by choosing an appropriate source image and apply its characteristic to another image View full abstract»

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  • Prototyping and transforming facial textures for perception research

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 42 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (153)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Transforming facial images along perceived dimensions (such as age, gender, race, or health) has application in areas as diverse as psychology, medicine, and forensics. We can use prototype images to define the salient features of a particular face classification (for example, European female adult or East-Asian male child). We then use the differences between two prototypes to define an axis of transformation, such as younger to older. By applying these changes to a given input face, we can change its apparent age, race, or gender. Psychological investigations reveal a limitation with existing methods that's particularly apparent when changing the age of faces. We relate the problem to the loss of facial textures (such as stubble and wrinkles) in the prototypes due to the blending process. We review the existing face prototyping and transformation methods and present a new, wavelet-based method for prototyping and transforming facial textures View full abstract»

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  • Quantum computing. 2

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 86 - 95
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    The author discusses some of the ideas of quantum computing and then digs into the notation and terminology. He uses physics language and symbology because it is the language of quantum computing. Bracket notation, qubits, multibit registers, entanglement, quantum gates and quantum full adders are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Elements of early vision for computer graphics

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 22 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Visually based techniques in computer graphics have blossomed. Important advances in perceptually driven rendering, realistic image display, high-fidelity visualization, and appearance-preserving geometric simplification have all been realized by applying knowledge of the limitations and capabilities of human visual processing. Much of this work is grounded in the physiology and psychophysics of early vision, which focuses on how visual mechanisms transduce and code the patterns of light arriving at the eye. The article surveys some of the fundamental findings in the study of early vision including basic visual anatomy and physiology, optical properties of the eye, light sensitivity and visual adaptation, and spatial vision View full abstract»

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  • Virtual 3D puzzles: a new method for exploring geometric models in VR

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 11 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In many areas, learning involves understanding complex spatial phenomena. For example, engineers must master the construction of machines as a prerequisite for maintenance, and the spatial composition of molecules is an important task in chemistry. Medical students have considerable difficulties in imagining the spatial relations within the human body, which they must learn in anatomy. With interactive 3D computer graphics based on high-resolution geometric models, we can explore these spatial relations. To exploit this potential, we've combined some new dedicated 3D interaction and visualization techniques in a system inspired by a 3D puzzle View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa