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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Aug. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • How to build smart appliances?

    Page(s): 66 - 71
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    In this article smart appliances are characterized as devices that are attentive to their environment. We introduce a terminology for situation, sensor data, context, and context-aware applications because it is important to gain a thorough understanding of these concepts to successfully build such artifacts. In the article the relation between a real-world situation and the data read by sensors is discussed; furthermore, an analysis of available sensing technology is given. Then we introduce an architecture that supports the transformation from sensor data to cues then to contexts as a foundation to make context-aware applications. The article suggests a method to build context-aware devices; the method starts from situation analysis, offers a structured way for selection of sensors, and finally suggests steps to determine recognition and abstraction methods. In the final part of the article the question of how this influences the applications is raised and the areas of user interfaces, communication, and proactive application scheduling are identified. We conclude with the description of a case study where a mobile phone was made aware of its environment using different sensors. The profile settings of the phone (ringing mode etc.) are automatically selected according to the real world situation the phone is used in. View full abstract»

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  • Sensor information networking architecture and applications

    Page(s): 52 - 59
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    This article introduces a sensor information networking architecture, called SINA, that facilitates querying, monitoring, and tasking of sensor networks. SINA serves the role of middleware that abstracts a network of sensor nodes as a collection of massively distributed objects. SINA's execution environment provides a set of configuration and communication primitives that enable scalable and energy-efficient organization of and interactions among sensor objects. On top the execution environment is a programmable substrate that provides mechanisms to create associations and coordinate activities among sensor nodes. Users then access information within a sensor network using declarative queries, or perform tasks using programming script View full abstract»

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  • Expressing user profiles for data recharging

    Page(s): 32 - 38
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    Mobile devices need two basic renewable resources - power and data. Power recharging is easy; data recharging is a much more problematic activity. It requires complex interaction between a user and a collection of data sources. We provide an automatic data recharging capability based on user profiles written in an expressive profile language. A profile identifies relevant information and orders it by its usefulness. We discuss the issues involved in designing a profile language for data recharging View full abstract»

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  • Designing an E-grocery application for a palm computer: usability and interface issues

    Page(s): 60 - 64
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    The coming ubiquity of handheld devices and e-commerce will offer many new design and application opportunities for human-computer interaction, many of them in “everyday” domains. This article reports on the iterative design of a handheld application for one such domain, grocery shopping. Our goal was to produce a solution for home ordering of groceries using a PDA. The article focuses on the evolution of the application design through a process that alternated design activities with formative evaluations in the field. At the end of the design and development process, 200 shoppers in the United Kingdom were using the resulting application View full abstract»

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  • Service discovery in DEAPspace

    Page(s): 39 - 45
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    The DEAPspace group at IBM Research, Zurich Lab is developing a system in which services can be shared between proximate devices. The target environment is single-hop short-range wireless systems, and the solution must offer prompt responsiveness for transient devices. In this article, the service discovery algorithm is presented. Through this new algorithm, a computing device can detect the presence of neighboring devices, share configuration and service information with those devices, and also notice when devices become unavailable. Targeted for wireless ad hoc single-hop networks, this solution improves the responsiveness of devices to changes in their environments. The effectiveness of this algorithm is demonstrated through comparison with others that achieve similar goals, considering the responsiveness to changes in the local environment, power consumption, and bandwidth requirement of devices View full abstract»

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  • PiNet: wireless connectivity for organizational information access using lightweight handheld devices

    Page(s): 18 - 23
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    In order to support connectivity requirements for today's pervasive devices, a new type of wireless network is needed. The pervasive information network (PiNet) is a new wireless connectivity architecture designed to support access to organizational information using lightweight handheld devices. PiNet's main objective is to support a mass-market-type application, where thousands of users can simultaneously have interactive access to a variety of organizational information sources while maintaining a short response time and using a simple, low-cost, power-limited pervasive device. This article summarizes the necessary characteristics of PiNet and presents a survey of the existing main technologies, explaining how they fall short of providing a total solution for pervasive wireless networks. In conclusion, this document indicates the direction that must be taken in order to design a solution that will provide a large number of users with a practical means of obtaining information in a timely manner View full abstract»

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  • Autoconfiguration, registration, and mobility management for pervasive computing

    Page(s): 24 - 31
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    In the vision of pervasive computing, users will exchange information and control their environments from anywhere using various wireline/wireless networks and computing devices. We believe that current protocols, such as DHCP, PPP, and Mobile IP, must be enhanced to support pervasive network access. In particular, this article identifies three fundamental functions: autoconfiguration, registration, and mobility management, that need such enhancements. Realizing that the IP autoconfiguration capabilities must be extended to configure routers and large dynamic networks, we first describe our autoconfiguration solution based on the dynamic configuration and distribution protocol (DCDP). Second, we discuss why providing user-specific services over a common infrastructure needs a uniform registration protocol, independent of the mobility and configuration mechanisms. We present an initial version of the basic user registration protocol (BURP), which provides secure client-network registration and interfaces to AAA protocols such as Diameter. Finally, we discuss the dynamic mobility agent (DMA) architecture, which provides a hierarchical and scalable mobility management framework. The DMA approach allows individual users to customize their own mobility-related features, such as paging, fast handoffs, and QoS support, over a common access infrastructure and to select multiple global binding protocols as appropriate View full abstract»

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  • Pervasive computing: vision and challenges

    Page(s): 10 - 17
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    This article discusses the challenges in computer systems research posed by the emerging field of pervasive computing. It first examines the relationship of this new field to its predecessors: distributed systems and mobile computing. It then identifies four new research thrusts: effective use of smart spaces, invisibility, localized scalability, and masking uneven conditioning. Next, it sketches a couple of hypothetical pervasive computing scenarios, and uses them to identify key capabilities missing from today's systems. The article closes with a discussion of the research necessary to develop these capabilities View full abstract»

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  • Uniform Web presence architecture for people, places, and things

    Page(s): 46 - 51
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    The Cooltown vision is that people, places, and things have a Web representation and that many useful services can be offered by creating a tighter link between the real world entity and its virtual representation. We defined a horizontal and uniform software architecture for building a Web presence for people, places, and things. This architecture enables the dynamic generation of Web contents based on the user context (location, identity, device capabilities), security permissions, and the relationships with other Web presences. Our implementation of this architecture is portable enough to be embedded in the entity that the Web presence describe but also scalable enough to support multiple Web presence hosting. We focused on making the creation of a Web presence easy for non-programmers View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

Full Aims & Scope