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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • An improved approach to application-specific power electronics education. Curriculum development

    Page(s): 282 - 288
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an innovative power electronics curriculum spanning the undergraduate and graduate programs. The curriculum develops the basic concepts of the field and applies them to modern industrial challenges to solve practical problems. It is based on three fundamental disciplines: switching devices, circuits and topologies and control and drives. The curriculum, which will facilitate the development of optimal systems, bridges the gap between power semiconductor devices and circuit design. An underlying principle of the curriculum is the development of optimal application-specific power electronics systems, achieved primarily through optimization of power semiconductor devices. The curriculum is described in detail with an emphasis on the courses pertaining to power semiconductor device physics and converter circuit design. The role of advanced computer-aided design tools is also identified and shown to facilitate an application-specific device design and optimization methodology. To further illustrate the effectiveness of this approach, two industry-relevant course projects performed in the curriculum are presented in detail View full abstract»

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  • Web-based peer review: the learner as both adapter and reviewer

    Page(s): 246 - 251
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (76 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study describes an effective web-based learning strategy, peer review, used by 143 computer science undergraduate students in an operating systems class at a Taiwanese university. Peer review, based on social constructivism, can be easily implemented via the authors' well-developed web-based peer review (WPR) system. Through peer review, the authors hope to form an authentic learning environment similar to an academic society in which a researcher submits a paper to a journal and receives reviews from society members before publication. Students using this learning strategy are expected to develop higher level thinking skills. The WPR system functioned in the following roles in this study: (1) an information distribution channel and management center for assignment submissions and peer review; (2) a forum for peer interaction and knowledge construction; and (3) storage for knowledge construction procedures. An evaluation of learning effects and students' perceptions about peer review during the spring of 1998 revealed that students not only performed better under peer review, but also displayed higher level thinking skills, i.e., critical thinking, planning, monitoring, and regulation. Students perceived peer review as an effective strategy that promoted their learning motivation. However, merely being an effective reviewer or an effective author may not excel in a peer review environment. The most effective individual appears to be the strategic adapter who effectively constructs a project, adjusts to peers' comments, and serves as a critical reviewer as well View full abstract»

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  • Mentoring undergraduates in computer vision research

    Page(s): 252 - 257
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB)  

    The future of society will be shaped by the young and talented minds going through colleges and universities today. During the last 14 years roughly 130 undergraduate students from several institutions have participated in the research experiences for undergraduates (REU) program funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). A large fraction of our students have been able to prepare a paper for submission to a conference, have the paper accepted, and then attend the conference to present the paper. Several participants have even accomplished enough substantial research to result in journal publications. Many past participants are now pursuing graduate studies at various institutions. In this paper, the REU model is described in detail; some examples of student success are discussed; and some observations are summarized View full abstract»

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  • Further results related to power supply design and analysis in the undergraduate curriculum

    Page(s): 262 - 267
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The power supply analysis and design results of Sherman and Hamacher are extended to include approximate solutions to the nonlinear equations that define the rectifier turn-on angles. Additionally, peak rectifier current solely as a function of ripple factor as well as the inverse relationship, i.e., ripple factor as a function of peak rectifier current, are also provided. Simplified exact equations and also new approximations are given for RMS transformer current. These new approximations allow the ripple factor to be determined as a function of RMS transformer current. These results are for both constant current and resistive load supplies View full abstract»

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  • Teaching MOS integrated circuit amplifier design to undergraduates

    Page(s): 232 - 238
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)  

    The enhancement-mode MOSFET is the primary active device used in present-day digital and mixed-signal integrated circuit processes. Thus, it is important to introduce this device and associated circuit design methods early in the electronics curriculum. This article discusses four integrated circuit MOSFET amplifier configurations; the current source/active load stage, the source follower, the cascode connection, and the differential stage with a current mirror load. These stages serve as building blocks for more complex MOSFET amplifiers and allow the introduction of MOSFET integrated circuit design principles View full abstract»

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  • An undergraduate laboratory in magnetic recording fundamentals

    Page(s): 224 - 231
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (156 KB)  

    An undergraduate course in data storage systems has been augmented with several laboratory experiments designed to enrich the students' understanding of magnetic hysteresis, magnetic sensors, and storage systems. In this paper, the three devices that have been designed for such experiments are described. Each device is conceptually simple and is easily replicated using inexpensive, off-the-shelf electronics. One device demonstrates the concept of magnetic hysteresis, displaying for students the hysteresis loop, including minor loops, of a toroid. A second device contrasts inductive and magnetoresistive readback techniques, illustrates the effects of velocity on each type of sensor, and shows the need for bias in magnetoresistive sensing to obtain a linear readback response. The last device, a modified version of the well-known audiotape recorder, provides a hands-on implementation of a simple magnetic recording system. Students can write, read, and analyze data to view the effects of frequency roll-off and write-saturation, and parameters such as PW50 and D50. Using a variety of tape materials in the collection of the experimental data, students can compare the properties of varying types of media View full abstract»

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  • Use of a field programmable gate array for education in manufacturing test and automatic test equipment

    Page(s): 239 - 245
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel approach to education in manufacturing test and automatic test equipment is described that makes use of a Xilinx XC4000 series field programmable gate array (FPGA). Automatic test equipment is first used to configure the chip as a desired circuit and then to apply test vectors to test the circuit for “manufacturing defects.” The chip can be configured as either fault-free or faulty, and several different types of functional faults can be injected. Use of the programmable device enables education in use of automatic test equipment to be combined with education in generation of effective test vectors for fault detection and diagnosis and also enables different classes to use the same device and load board to represent different circuits. This approach is suitable for both academic and industrial environments and should be particularly useful for customer training by manufacturers of automatic test equipment View full abstract»

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  • Statistical analysis of final year project marks in the computer engineering undergraduate program

    Page(s): 258 - 261
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study is to find the existence of discrepancy between the supervisor and assessor in project assessment. A systematic approach is suggested using statistical analysis. Project marks of the computer engineering program obtained from the past two years are recorded using Excel and analyzed using SPSS. Using one-way analysis of variance, it is found that the reason for the discrepancy is due to the excessively low marks given by the assessors. The outcome of this study helps to identify those projects that need to be reassessed. Standardization of the project assessment guarantees that the marking is fair and truly reflects the student performance View full abstract»

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  • An analysis of application rates to programs in information technology, science, and engineering

    Page(s): 268 - 275
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB)  

    A shift away from generic undergraduate degrees toward an emphasis on vocationally oriented qualifications has been evident in the awards offered by higher education institutions in Australia over the past few years. This has included those in information technology, science and engineering, where the growth in the number of, and variation in, awards has been particularly evident. The past few years have also seen a general, and in some cases significant, decline in the application rates for some forms of science and engineering. This has prompted many institutions to look at their awards with a view to making them more attractive, both to students and industry, often through the development of more highly specialized awards. In this paper, the authors investigate application trends for information technology, science and engineering awards from a number of perspectives, including the market perceptions of the institution offering the degree. Although the paper focuses on three broad categories of awards-information technology, science and engineering-some lessons may be appropriate for other disciplines. Moreover, although this study takes advantage of the centralized admissions systems used in Australia, available indicators show that the results may well be applicable in the United States and the U.K. and possibly elsewhere View full abstract»

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  • Use of a spreadsheet program in electromagnetics

    Page(s): 292 - 297
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB)  

    This paper describes how a spreadsheet program can assist electromagnetics education at the undergraduate level. Spreadsheet software has proven to be an important pedagogical tool for a variety of problems in electrical engineering education. Using the power of the 123 macros, a menu driven spreadsheet program is used to compute the solution of some electrostatic boundary value problems for an introductory-level electromagnetics course. With the on-screen numerical and visual feedback and the ease of entering data, students will be able to take a close look at the effects of varying the input data of the model problems View full abstract»

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  • Research on learning style: applications in the physics and engineering classrooms

    Page(s): 276 - 281
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (52 KB)  

    Several approaches to teaching undergraduate physics and engineering students using both the Dunn and Dunn and the Kolb learning style models are discussed. The Dunn and Dunn learning style model is employed with nonmajors enrolled in introductory physics at American University and the Kolb learning style model is employed with freshman engineering students at Purdue University. The basic elements of these two learning style models are compared and contrasted. Teaching approaches that have been successful with these two distinctly different populations of students are shared. These approaches can easily be adapted for use by educators in other branches of computing as well as science, mathematics, engineering and technology education View full abstract»

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  • Phase plane analysis of first-order system with transport lag

    Page(s): 289 - 291
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (56 KB)  

    This correspondence presents some unfamiliar aspects of the phase plane method when applied to controlled systems containing transport lag. A simple example is used to illustrate the design of trajectories which can be obtained either from a numerical simulator or via a true setup. It is then shown that the usual phase plane trajectory of plant with pure delay provokes a spiral motion around the stable singular point View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University