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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Scanning the issue

    Page(s): 1143 - 1144
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  • Prolog to renewable energy today and tomorrow

    Page(s): 1214 - 1215
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  • Scanning our past from London: From telephone to television

    Page(s): 1227 - 1229
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    This article presents a biography of John Logie Baird, the inventor of television, and also discusses the connections of electronic TV systems with telephone technology. View full abstract»

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  • Prospects for single molecule information processing devices

    Page(s): 1147 - 1173
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    Present information technologies use semiconductor devices and magnetic/optical discs; however, they are all foreseen to face fundamental limitations within a decade. Therefore, superseding devices are required for the next paradigm of high-performance information technologies. “Single molecule devices” have been expected to be the most probable candidate; however, they have not been made practical since they were first proposed more than a quarter of a century ago. The major obstacles are the extreme difficulty in accessing a single molecule, and the very complicated electron states of a molecule connected to electrodes. With the advancements in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and simulation technologies, the design and demonstration of single molecule devices are close to reality. This paper first reviews the architectures suitable for single molecule information processing, in which it is claimed that the performances of information processing is higher, if speed and element number product is larger in almost all architectures. Then, prospects for single molecule devices, including switching devices, wires, diodes, nanotubes, optical devices, storage devices and sensing devices for future information technologies and other advanced applications are described. Four milestones for realizing the peta/exa-floating operations per second (FLOPS) personal molecular supercomputer are proposed. Current status and necessary technologies of the first milestone are described and necessary technologies for the next three milestones are also discussed View full abstract»

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  • Using advanced simulation to aid microlithography development

    Page(s): 1194 - 1215
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    An early historical overview is first presented here on the use of simulation in optical microlithography, along with a description of the general physical models. This paper then turns to more recent development work in microlithography simulation, which has followed several very different tracts. Three of the most important areas are discussed here. The first involves improvements in the underlying physical models, such as advances beyond the Kirchhoff boundary condition in optical diffraction theory, as well as a deeper understanding into the chemistry and physical behavior of photoresist materials. Such work guides basic understanding both in the optics and photoresist areas. At the other extreme, phenomenological models are being advanced to enable simulation results on large scales to be placed in the hands of device and circuit designers. Finally, optimization of the large number of allowable parameters is a pervasive problem that has received much attention and interest by the engineering community View full abstract»

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  • Telerehabilitation: Expanding access to rehabilitation expertise

    Page(s): 1174 - 1193
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    The potential of modern telecommunications and computing technologies as tools in the delivery and evaluation of assistive technology (AT) has been discussed and has been termed telerehabilitation. The problems of providing AT in rural areas parallels the delivery of health care to rural areas where the proportion of people with chronic illnesses is higher and the means to pay for them is reduced. Large distances mean long travel times, increasing costs associated with any service delivery, and consuming valuable time skilled professionals could be using to provide services elsewhere. The technology available for practising telerehabilitation is significant and expanding at a rapid rate. Currently, plain old telephone systems (POTS) and broad-band videoconferencing equipment, Internet and World Wide Web, and embedded processor systems are most widely available. These technologies continue to evolve as well as emerging technologies such as wearable sensors that will have telehabilitation applications. Issues of payment, safety liability, and licensure need to be resolved, as legislation lags the development of new technologies View full abstract»

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  • Renewable energy today and tomorrow

    Page(s): 1216 - 1226
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    Energy is essential to our society to ensure our quality of life and to underpin all other elements of our economy. Renewable energy technologies offer the promise of clean, abundant energy gathered from self-renewing resources such as the sun, wind, earth, and plants. Virtually all regions of the United States and the world have renewable resources of one type or another. Renewable resources currently account for about 10% of the energy consumed in the United States, most of this is from hydropower and traditional biomass sources. Wind, solar biomass, and geothermal technologies are cost-effective today in an increasing number of markets, and are making important steps to broader commercialization. Each of the renewable energy technologies is in a different stage of research, development, and commercialization, and all have differences in current and future expected costs, current industrial base, resource availability, and potential impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The technical status, cost, and applications of major renewable energy technologies and implications for increased adoption of renewables will be reviewed View full abstract»

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